Academic Calendar

MUSC – Music

MUSC 100
Introduction to Music
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the study of music through a historical survey of Western art-music with an emphasis on listening, rudimentary theory, and analysis. In addition, students identify some of the individuals and socio-political forces that shaped the development of this music. Students are not required to be able to read or perform music.

MUSC 103
Theory I: Introduction to Music Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students are introduced to the rudiments of music and music theory, the fundamentals of functional harmony, and the foundations of common practice and jazz/contemporary harmonic theory. The course is coordinated with Ear Training I curriculum, provides the theoretical background required of first-year principal instrument, master classes and performance ensembles, and prepares students for advanced studies in theory and its application to interpretation, arranging and composition.

MUSC 104
Theory II: Harmony, Voice Leading, and Function
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students expand their understanding of the vertical and linear aspects of harmony including chord structure and voicing, voice leading, chord progressions, chord substitutions, harmonic function, and the phrase model. Students focus on the application of theoretical concepts through analysis and writing. The course is divided into two parts: (1) jazz harmony and relevant issues in contemporary popular music; (2) common-practice harmony and voice leading.

Prerequisites: MUSC 103.

MUSC 111
Ear Training I
3 Credits          Total (45-0-0)

Students develop essential musical skills including aural identification and vocalization of intervals, chords, rhythms and melodies, as well as sight singing melodies and rhythms. Ear Training I is aligned with course content and learning in Theory I.

MUSC 112
Ear Training II
3 Credits          Weekly (0-3-0)

Students continue to develop the essential musical skills introduced in Ear Training I including aural identification and vocalization of intervals, chords, rhythms and melodies, melodic and rhythmic dictation, and sight singing melodies and rhythms. Ear Training II is aligned with instruction and learning in Theory II.

Prerequisites: MUSC 111.

MUSC 123
Musicology I: Historical Musicology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces critical listening, research methods, and writing for musicology through the lenses of historical and critical musicology, with a focus on the composition, performance, reception and aesthetics of music over time.

MUSC 124
Musicology II: Popular Music Studies
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course builds on the critical listening, research methods, and writing for musicology introduced in through the lenses of historical and critical musicology in Music 123. By introducing a critical media studies approach to musicology, this course provides an opportunity to discuss musical creative and musical economics in the digital age. This course also introduces contemporary digital research and dissemination approaches.

Prerequisites: MUSC 123.

MUSC 131
Principal Instrument I
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Students receive individual instruction in technique and its application to repertoire. The course consists of private lessons that primarily prepare the student for two juried examinations: a technical jury and a repertoire jury. Note: Only full-time students admitted to the Music Program may take this course.

MUSC 132
Principal Instrument II
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Students receive individual instruction in technique and its application to repertoire. The course consists of private lessons that primarily prepare the student for two juried examinations: a technical jury and a repertoire jury.

Prerequisites: MUSC 131.

MUSC 141
Master Class I
3 Credits          Weekly (1.5-2-0)

Master Class I is the first in a series of courses that develop a wide variety of essential performance skills and abilities within an ensemble environment. The Master Class courses address style, repertoire, technique, reading, improvisation, performance, listening and other skills that are necessary for the professional jazz and contemporary popular musician. Note: Only full-time students admitted to the Music Program may take this course.

MUSC 142
Master Class II
3 Credits          Weekly (1.5-2-0)

Master Class II is the second in a series of courses that develop a wide variety of essential performance skills and abilities within an ensemble environment. The Master Class courses address style, repertoire, technique, reading, improvisation, performance, listening and other skills that are necessary for the professional jazz and contemporary popular musician.

Prerequisites: MUSC 141.

MUSC 188
Performance Ensemble
0 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 188 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term I of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

MUSC 189
Performance Ensemble
0 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 189 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term II of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUSC 188.

MUSC 201
Theory III: Jazz Harmony and Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Building on the rudiments of jazz harmony introduced in Year 1, this course presents an in-depth study of the vertical and linear structures that are characteristic of traditional and contemporary jazz compositions. Critical listening aligned with score reading is an important activity in this course. Topics include harmonic function, chord construction, chord substitution and linear embellishment, voicing and voice leading, melody, rhythm and form. Students complete analytical, critical listening and critical writing assignments that draw from the significant styles and genres of jazz.

Prerequisites: MUSC 104 or MUSC 102.

MUSC 202
Theory IV: Chromatic Harmony
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the formal, structural, and harmonic techniques used in tonal music from the late eighteenth century through to the early twentieth century. The study of tertian harmonic structures and chromatic manipulation, and the crucial relationship between harmony, function, and form is the focus of this course. Topics include chromatic harmony, sequences, mixture, modulation, form and analysis. Repertoire for study draws from the symphonic, concerto and chamber music literature from the historical periods in question. Students enhance their theoretical and practical understanding of chromatic harmony by completing a number of compositional, analytical and critical listening assignments.

Prerequisites: MUSC 201.

MUSC 207
Songwriting I
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course is an introduction to the art and craft of songwriting in which students develop proficiency in a variety of songwriting techniques. An examination of the songwriting process and related concepts include the relation of meter and rhythm to motive and melody, form, attaching lyrics to melody, and song refinement.

Prerequisites: MUSC 104 or MUSC 102.

MUSC 208
Songwriting II
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

In this course, students continue to explore the art and craft of songwriting. Students examine and develop skills in a variety of songwriting techniques and concepts including writing lyrics and melodies, utilizing song forms, setting lyrics to melody, rewriting, and co-writing. A component of this course examines market trends, song demos, marketing songs, and other aspects of the business of songwriting.

Prerequisites: MUSC 104 or MUSC 102.

MUSC 211
Composition I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the art and craft of composition and prepares them for further study in this area. Through lectures, demonstrations, score study and listening, students acquire familiarity with the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic elements and techniques of composition that apply to a wide range of genres and styles in the context of jazz and contemporary idioms. Students develop essential skills as they complete a variety of compositions that focus on blues, modal, and groove/ostinato based composition.

Prerequisites: MUSC 104 or MUSC 102.

MUSC 212
Composition II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students continue the study of jazz and contemporary idioms through lectures, demonstrations, score analysis and listening. Compositions in this course address complex formal structures, counterpoint and ensemble writing. Students develop essential skills as they complete a variety of compositions that explore contrafact ballads, complex modal forms and an introduction to string quartets and film scoring.

Prerequisites: MUSC 211.

MUSC 213
Ear Training III
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Ear Training III addresses three interrelated areas of study: aural skills, sight-reading skills, and music theory. The ability to recognize and identify elemental musical structures and to determine their relationships through traditional and jazz theory is a primary focus of this course. Singing is practiced in class using the Tonic sol-fa system in conjunction with the scale-degree system.

Prerequisites: MUSC 112.

MUSC 214
Ear Training IV
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In Ear Training IV, students continue to explore the relationship of aural and reading skills, and music theory. Regular activities include melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation exercises, singing using the Tonic sol-fa system in conjunction with the scale-degree system, and performing rhythms in simple, compound, asymmetrical and composite meters. Examples and excerpts used in this course reflect a wide stylistic perspective (traditional, contemporary popular, and jazz).

Prerequisites: MUSC 213.

MUSC 215
Functional Keyboard I
1.5 Credits          Weekly (0-2-0)

In this course, instrumentalists and vocalists are introduced to the essential keyboard skills required of contemporary musicians. Students develop basic technical ability and reading skills through exercises, études, and examples drawn from jazz and contemporary popular repertoires. Students study a syllabus of scales, chords, voicings, progressions and voice leading models, and prepare for a final performance examination comprising technical, sight-reading, and repertoire components. Note: This course is not open to pianists (Principal and Applied Instrument).

Prerequisites: MUSC 132 and (MUSC 104 or MUSC 102).

MUSC 216
Functional Keyboard II
1.5 Credits          Weekly (0-2-0)

This course continues to develop the concepts and skills introduced in Functional Keyboard I. Through the study of technical exercises and études in combination with examples drawn from jazz and contemporary popular repertoires, students develop essential techniques, reading skills, and basic accompanying skills. Students study a comprehensive syllabus of scales and chords, progressions, voicings and voice leading models, and prepare for a performance exam comprising technical, sight-reading, and repertoire components that reflect a diversity of contemporary styles. Note: This course is not open to pianists (Principal and Applied Instrument).

Prerequisites: MUSC 215.

MUSC 217
Accompanying I
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

Accompanying I focuses on developing the skills required of pianists (Principal or Applied Instrument courses) to accompany vocalists and instrumentalists through the study of contemporary popular repertoires. Emphasis is also placed on developing an awareness of style and genre, fostering critical listening skills, and exploring the dynamic relationship between the accompanist and the soloist. Students prepare for a juried performance examination that consists of sight-reading and repertoire components.

Prerequisites: MUSC 132 (piano).

MUSC 218
Accompanying II
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

Accompanying II continues to develop the skills required of pianists (Principal and Applied Instrument courses) to accompany vocalists and instrumentalists through the study of standard blues and R&B, jazz, and contemporary musical theatre repertoires. Emphasis is also placed on developing an awareness of style and genre, fostering critical listening skills, and exploring the dynamic relationship between the accompanist and the soloist. Students prepare for a juried performance examination that consists of sight-reading and repertoire components.

Prerequisites: MUSC 217.

MUSC 221
Applied Instrument I
1.5 Credits          Total (0-5.25-0)

Upper-year students in the Composition and General routes receive bi-weekly private lessons on their major instrument with focus on technique, repertoire development and style. The private teacher and the student select pieces from standard jazz and popular music repertoires for study and examination. Students also prepare for a juried technical examination that is given at the end of term.

Prerequisites: MUSC 132.

MUSC 222
Applied Instrument II
1.5 Credits          Total (0-5.25-0)

This course builds on the skills developed in Applied Music I. Upper-year students in the Composition and General routes continue to receive bi-weekly private lessons on their major instrument, with focus on technique, repertoire development and style. The private teacher and the student select pieces from standard jazz and popular music repertoires for study and examination. Students complete a juried repertoire examination given at the end of term at which they are assessed on presentation, technical ability, interpretation and stylistic aspects.

Prerequisites: MUSC 221.

MUSC 233
Principal Instrument III
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive individual instruction in technique and its application to repertoire. The course consists of private lessons that primarily prepare the student for two juried examinations: a technical jury and a repertoire jury.

Prerequisites: MUSC 132.

MUSC 235
Principal Instrument IV
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive individual instruction in technique and its application to repertoire. The course consists of private lessons that primarily prepare the student for two juried examinations: a technical jury and a repertoire jury.

Prerequisites: MUSC 233.

MUSC 243
Master Class III
3 Credits          Weekly (1.5-2-0)

Master Class III is the third in a series of courses that develop a wide variety of essential performance skills and abilities within an ensemble environment. The Master Class courses address style, repertoire, technique, reading, improvisation, performance, listening and other skills that are necessary for the professional jazz and contemporary popular musician.

Prerequisites: MUSC 132 and MUSC 142.

MUSC 244
Master Class IV
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

Master Class IV is the final course in the series of courses that develop a wide variety of essential performance skills and abilities within an ensemble environment. The Master Class courses address style, repertoire, technique, reading, improvisation, performance, listening and other skills that are necessary for the professional jazz and contemporary popular musician.

Prerequisites: MUSC 243.

MUSC 253
Live Sound Reinforcement I
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course addresses sound reinforcement for music applications. Students examine sound in live situations, how sound behaves and how it is amplified. Students are introduced to the essential equipment used in the sound reinforcement industry, and develop the skills and abilities necessary to set up and operate a basic PA system. The course integrates practical experience in a concert or event setting with classroom instruction.

Prerequisites: MUSC 132 and MUSC 142.

MUSC 254
Live Sound Reinforcement II
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course continues to develop the skills established in Live Sound Reinforcement I. Students expand their knowledge of advanced concert sound reinforcement. Students also acquire an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of all the people involved with a major concert and how to work as part of that crew. The course integrates practical experience in a concert or event setting with classroom instruction.

Prerequisites: MUSC 253.

MUSC 263
Introduction to Music Technology and Production
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course provides students with an understanding of the primary types of technology commonly used in music. In addition to lectures, the course has a lab component in which students acquire basic operational skills for various music technologies. Topics include: Macintosh laptop and operating systems; an introduction to the principles of sound, microphones and recording; computer-based notation: sequencing; mixing and effects processing; an introduction to MIDI; synthesis; a survey of the various hardware used in other program courses.

Prerequisites: MUSC 104 or MUSC 102.

MUSC 294
Performance Ensemble
0 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 294 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term III of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUSC 189.

MUSC 295
Performance Ensemble
0 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 295 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term IV of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUSC 294.

MUSC 301
Special Project I
1 Credit          Weekly (0-0-2)

This course provides the student an opportunity to explore a specific area of interest. Projects are faculty supervised and may focus exclusively on creative work, performance, research and writing, recording and production, or an aspect of music management, or incorporate a combination of these areas. Students require prior approval of the chair of music in order to be eligible to enroll in this course. NOTE: Upon successful completion of the first attempt at MUSC 301 and permission from the chair of music in consultation with the faculty supervisor, students may repeat this course for credit in order to continue and develop their projects.

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and 103, and 30 credits of BMus courses including MUSC 123 and 124.

MUSC 302
Special Project II
2 Credits          Weekly (0-0-4)

This course provides the student an opportunity to explore a specific area of interest. Projects are faculty supervised and may focus exclusively on creative work, performance, research and writing, recording and production, or an aspect of music management, or incorporate a combination of these areas. Students require prior approval of the chair of music in order to be eligible to enroll in this course. NOTE: Upon successful completion of the first attempt at MUSC 302 and permission from the chair of music in consultation with the faculty supervisor, students may repeat this course for credit in order to continue and develop their projects.

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and 103, and 30 credits of BMus courses including MUSC 123 and 124.

MUSC 303
Special Project III
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-6)

This course provides the student an opportunity to explore, in depth, a specific area of interest. Projects are faculty supervised and may focus exclusively on creative work, performance, research and writing, recording and production, or an aspect of music management, or incorporate a combination of these areas. Students require prior approval of the chair of music in order to be eligible to enroll in this course.

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 and 103, and 30 credits of BMus courses including MUSC 123 and 124.

MUSC 313
Arranging I: Introduction to Arranging
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

Students acquire practical knowledge of arranging for the small jazz ensemble. Topics include woodwind, brass and rhythm section instruments, rhythm section arranging, two, three and four-part harmonizations, “thickened line” writing, background writing, linear/contrapuntal concepts in 2-part writing, and considerations of form and balance in planning an arrangement. Course content is structured towards a full-scale arrangement as the final major project.

Prerequisites: MUSC 201.

MUSC 314
Arranging II: Arranging for Large Ensembles
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

Building on the concepts, techniques and skills acquired in Arranging I, students expand their knowledge of harmony and orchestration in order to write for the contemporary jazz orchestra (big band). Concepts and techniques presented in lectures, in addition to insights gained through the analysis of seminal recordings and scores, are developed through practical assignments. Students are encouraged to develop their personal style, and will produce a complete, original arrangement for big band as the final project.

Prerequisites: MUSC 313.

MUSC 326
Composition III
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The focus of this course is writing for the voice. Through analysis and writing projects, students expand their knowledge of compositional issues as they apply and adapt techniques to the creation of Art Songs, Popular Songs and Chorale writing. In addition to lectures, students receive private lessons in which pertinent issues relating to their own compositions are addressed. Students present works-in-progress and discuss their process to the class, and present completed works in recitals.

Prerequisites: MUSC 212.

MUSC 327
Composition IV
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores the primary movements of twentieth-century post-tonal composition, including impressionism, serialism, and minimalism. Students develop technique in these styles by writing for a variety of instrumentation. In addition to lectures, students receive private lessons in which pertinent issues relating to their creative compositional works are addressed. Students present works-in-progress and discuss their process to the class, and present completed works in recitals.

Prerequisites: MUSC 326.

MUSC 335
Principal Instrument V
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive private lessons on their major instrument with a focus on technique, repertoire development, style, applied theory and development of aural skills. In addition, the private lesson prepares performance majors for the juried repertoire performance examination held at the end of the term.

Prerequisites: MUSC 235 or MUSC 234.

MUSC 336
Principal Instrument VI
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive private lessons on their major instrument with a focus on technique, repertoire development, style, applied theory and development of aural skills. In addition, the private lesson prepares performance majors for their Junior Recital (MUSC 371).

Prerequisites: MUSC 335.

Co-requisites: MUSC 371.

MUSC 348
Contemporary Issues in Performance Practice and Techniques I
1.5 Credits          Weekly (0-2-0)

This course examines issues and performance practices in jazz and contemporary popular music from theoretical and practical viewpoints. Students analyze performance practice, investigate artistic and style-related topics, prepare repertoire to perform in master-class settings, and research pertinent issues and present findings. This course also prepares students for the Junior Recital (MUSC 371).

Prerequisites: MUSC 244 and MUSC 235.

MUSC 358
Improvisation I
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

This course is a study of improvisation practices and techniques idiomatic to jazz music, with an emphasis on standard and bebop repertoire. Through analyses of seminal recorded performances, transcription and listening assignments, and in-class performance, students will develop a practical understanding of jazz language, sound, feel, and phrasing, as well as theoretical concepts such as melodic and rhythmic development, chord/scale relationships, and motivic development. The vital role of the rhythm section in improvisation, including comping, interplay, texture, and dynamics, will also be examined.

Prerequisites: MUSC 201 and (MUSC 247 or MUSC 244).

MUSC 359
Improvisation II
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

This course builds on skills and knowledge presented in MUSC 358 (Improvisation I). This course is a study of improvisation practices and techniques idiomatic to jazz music, with an emphasis on modal, modern, and contemporary repertoire. Through analyses of seminal recorded performances, transcription and listening assignments, and in-class performance, students will develop a practical understanding of modern jazz language, sound, feel, and phrasing, as well as theoretical concepts such as thematic development, modal harmony, chromaticism, melodic and harmonic superimposition, and polyrhythms. The varied roles of the rhythm section and ensemble in modern jazz performance, from comping and interplay to collective improvisation, will also be examined.

Prerequisites: MUSC 358.

MUSC 361
Introduction to Music Career Management
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an overview of fundamental issues that have an impact on the contemporary musician’s career. Students will be introduced to a broad range of topics, providing them with basic knowledge and tools to begin managing their own careers, as well as a foundation for more advanced study in subsequent music career management courses. Topics include ethics and professional practice, career planning, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, marketing, intellectual property, project planning, fundraising, musician's health, and social issues in the music industry.

MUSC 362
The Business of Music
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students examine the financial, legal and political aspects of the music business. The focus of this course is on the fundamentals of a contract, the independent musician as a legal entity, copyrights, finance and planning, accounting practices, and the principles of project management. Sources to fund or finance a project are introduced, including grant awards in Canada. Opportunities and requirements to work internationally are discussed.

Prerequisites: MUSC 361 or MUSC 271.

MUSC 364
Applications in Music Technology I
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

This course focuses on the development of the creative application of technologies used in current music and audio production, and the foundations and theories that underlie these skills and practices. Through classroom and focused project work, students gain knowledge and experience with Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)-centric composition and production with emphasis on synthesizer programming, MIDI and audio tracking, editing and mixing, working with visual media, audio mastering, and delivery.

Prerequisites: MUSC 263 or MUSC 261.

MUSC 366
Introduction to the Recording Studio
3 Credits          Weekly (0-4-0)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of recording engineering. Students study the behaviour of sound, acoustics, recording studio design, analog and digital audio, and the theory and operation of common recording studio equipment. Practical learning concentrates on studio procedures, set up, and the operation of equipment. Students learn to make optimal use of a state-of-the-art recording studio as they complete a variety of multi-track recording projects.

Prerequisites: MUSC 263 or MUSC 261.

MUSC 371
Junior Recital
0 Credits          Weekly (0-0-0)

The Junior Recital is a juried public recital in which performance majors demonstrate their ability to prepare and rehearse a varied repertoire, and exhibit stylistic awareness, technical and artistic prowess, musical imagination, and professionalism. Students create the arrangements and direct the rehearsals, prepare the printed programme and provide the posters, and coordinate with production and recording technicians. The repertoire draws from the Jazz, World and Contemporary Popular areas, and is selected in consultation with the student’s private lesson instructor and faculty supervisor [section head].

Prerequisites: MUSC 335.

Co-requisites: MUSC 336.

MUSC 380
Directed Project
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-1)

This is a faculty-supervised, project-driven course that allows senior-level students to pursue independent work in a primary area of interest, including research and writing, composing, recording, or preparing and performing repertoire. Students are required to submit a formal proposal and obtain the written approval of the chair of music in order to be eligible to enroll in this course. NOTE: Upon successful completion of the first attempt at MUSC 380 and permission from the chair of music in consultation with the faculty supervisor, students may repeat this course for credit in order to continue and develop their projects.

Prerequisites: 60 credits of BMus courses including MUSC 123 and MUSC 124.

MUSC 396
Performance Ensemble
1 Credit          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 396 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term V of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUSC 295.

MUSC 397
Performance Ensemble
1 Credit          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 397 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term VI of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUSC 396.

MUSC 415
Orchestration
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

This course introduces students to writing for the symphony orchestra through a brief survey of the historical development of the orchestra, with focus on the principal families of instruments that constitute the modern orchestra. Students acquire knowledge of the characteristics and roles of orchestral instruments, and the notational conventions associated with scoring for these instruments. Periodic writing assignments reinforce the essential principles of orchestration including featuring, combining and balancing instruments for pragmatic and expressive reasons, and realizing orchestral arrangements from piano scores, compositional sketches and other musical media. The final project for this course is a fully scored orchestration of an excerpt or piece.

Prerequisites: MUSC 313 or (MUSC 203 and MUSC 204).

MUSC 416
Scoring for Film and Other Visual Media
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

This course focuses on the aesthetic and technical demands of composing and producing music for feature films, episodic television, and other visual media, with emphasis on the concepts of musical association and musical meaning. Students are introduced to a wide variety of notable film scores, complete a series of scoring projects for mixed instrumentation using virtual and real instruments, and learn how to synchronize music with visual media through the use of computer software and real time methods.

Prerequisites: MUSC 263 or MUSC 261 AND MUSC 313 or (MUSC 203 and MUSC 204).

MUSC 417
Composition V
1.5 Credits          Total (0-22.5-0)

The focus of this course is the development of the student’s unique voice as a composer. Students continue to undertake extensive writing projects in anticipation of the Composition Graduation Recital. Lectures and labs address pertinent issues relating to their compositions, including labs in song writing, composing in the digital-audio workstation (DAW) environment, composing for chamber ensembles, and jazz combo/big band writing.

Prerequisites: MUSC 327.

MUSC 418
Composition VI
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

This course focuses on final preparation for the Composition Graduation Recital, which is a juried, public concert of original works. Lectures and labs follow the same structure as Composition V (MUSC 417), allowing students to continue developing their music toward the final recital.

Prerequisites: MUSC 417.

Co-requisites: MUSC 474.

MUSC 424
Ethnomusicology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students will be introduced to development and current practice of ethnomusicology in Canada with special attention to the methods of research that make the discipline a unique form of musicology. Students explore music as sound and culture, as social practice, as a contributor to the creative economy, and as expression of meaning with emphasis on the development of ethnographic methods and contemporary methods of research dissemination.

Prerequisites: MUSC 427.

MUSC 426
History of Electro-Acoustic Music
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students examine the history of electro-acoustic music in relation to the significant composers of this music and their seminal works. Through lectures, readings, critical listening and analysis, students investigate the ideas, techniques and technologies that determined the development of this genre and its influence on other genres. Students are introduced to the various instruments inherent to the genre and the unique and often idiosyncratic notational systems used by various composers. Aesthetics of electro-acoustic music in context of other 20th-century musical and cultural movements, and the ethical problems and controversies arising from the use of musique concrète and sampling techniques are also addressed.

Prerequisites: MUSC 263 or MUSC 261.

MUSC 427
Cultural Studies of Music
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the analysis of contemporary popular music culture and the key thinkers and theorists from cultural studies and critical theory who have made seminal contributions to the field. The development of research and writing methods is an essential aspect of this course.

Prerequisites: MUSC 123 and 124.

MUSC 437
Principal Instrument VII
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive private lessons on their major instrument with a focus on technique, repertoire development, style, applied theory and development of aural skills. In addition, the private lesson prepares performance majors for the juried repertoire performance examination held at the end of the term.

Prerequisites: MUSC 336 and MUSC 348 and MUSC 371.

Co-requisites: MUSC 472 and MUSC 452.

MUSC 438
Principal Instrument VIII
3 Credits          Total (0-10.5-0)

Performance majors receive private lessons on their major instrument with a focus on technique, repertoire development, style, applied theory and development of aural skills. In addition, the private lesson supports preparation for the Graduation Recital (Performance major).

Prerequisites: MUSC 437 and MUSC 452 and MUSC 472.

Co-requisites: MUSC 473.

MUSC 452
Contemporary Issues in Performance Practice and Techniques II
1.5 Credits          Weekly (0-2-0)

Students examine issues and performance practices in jazz and popular music from theoretical and practical viewpoints, investigate artistic and style-related topics, prepare repertoire to perform in master-class settings, research pertinent issues and present findings, build a core repertoire, and develop ensemble directing skills. This course prepares students for the Area Examination (MUSC 472) and the Performance Graduation Recital (MUSC 473).

Prerequisites: MUSC 348.

Co-requisites: MUSC 472.

MUSC 460
Improvisation III
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

This course is a study of the improvisation techniques idiomatic to popular music. Students analyze performances drawn from the canonic repertoire of popular music. Practical applications of theoretical concepts including motivic development, chord-scale relationships, line and interval, and rhythmic development, as well as style, feel and expression are developed through analysis, transcription and performance. Performance constitutes the primary activity of this course.

Prerequisites: MUSC 359.

MUSC 461
Improvisation IV
1.5 Credits          Weekly (1.5-0-0)

This course is a study of the improvisation techniques idiomatic to jazz music. Students analyze performances drawn from the canonic repertoire of jazz music. Practical applications of theoretical concepts including motivic development, chord-scale relationships, line and interval, and rhythmic development, as well as style, feel and expression are developed through analysis, transcription and performance. Performance constitutes the primary activity of this course.

Prerequisites: MUSC 460.

MUSC 465
Applications in Music Technology II
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

Building on the skills and theory introduced in MUSC 364, this course explores the advanced use of technology in music composition and audio production. Topics include sound design, synthesizer programming, advanced work with visual media, and advanced DAW-based MIDI and audio production techniques, all of which are addressed at a level commensurate with professional-level expectations. Additional topics include advanced synthesis designs, alternate controllers and control protocols, multi-channel audio production, and an introduction to interactive programming.

Prerequisites: MUSC 364.

MUSC 467
Recording Studio Production
3 Credits          Weekly (0-4-0)

This course focuses on the producer’s critical and varied roles in the process of recording studio production. Through lectures, reading, analytical listening, and project-driven coursework, students will solidify their understanding of the process of music production in context of the recording studio environment. Ultimately, students will model the traits of the successful producer in realistic production situations.

Prerequisites: MUSC 366.

MUSC 468
Acoustics and the Science of Musical Instruments
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores the physical and psychological nature of sound. Students learn about the entire life of a sound, starting with its physical origins from musical instruments, how it travels in the environment, and how the listener perceives it. Students undertake several projects in which they will apply essential principles to real-life situations and creatively explore key concepts.

Prerequisites: MUSC 261 or MUSC 263.

MUSC 472
Area Examination
0 Credits          Weekly (0-0-0)

Performance majors present and defend a programme proposal for their Graduation Recital (MUSC 473) that speaks to their knowledge of the repertoire in terms of historical and contemporary sources, the significance of the selected works, the important musicians associated with these works, the genres and styles, and the requirements of preparing for and mounting the recital.

Prerequisites: MUSC 348, MUSC 336 and MUSC 371.

Co-requisites: MUSC 437 and MUSC 452.

MUSC 473
Graduation Recital, Performance Major
0 Credits          Weekly (0-0-0)

The Graduation Recital, Performance (MUSC 473) is a “main stage” juried public concert. Performance majors prepare and rehearse a varied repertoire that speaks to their primary artistic and professional interests and goals. In this recital, students exhibit stylistic authenticity, technical mastery, artistic prowess, musical imagination, and professionalism. Students create the arrangements and direct the rehearsals, prepare the printed programme and provide the posters, and coordinate with production and recording technicians. The repertoire and all other aspects of this recital are determined and approved in consultation with the student’s private lesson instructor and faculty supervisor through the process of the Area Examination (MUSC 472).

Prerequisites: MUSC 472 and MUSC 452 and MUSC 437.

Co-requisites: MUSC 438.

MUSC 474
Graduation Recital and Portfolio (Composition)
0 Credits          Weekly (0-0-0)

The Graduation Recital is a “main stage” juried, public concert that represents the culmination of the candidate’s studies in composition. In this recital, students exhibit personal compositional style, technical mastery, artistic prowess, musical imagination, and professionalism. In addition to the creation of the compositions and preparation of the scores and parts, students direct the rehearsals, prepare the printed programme and provide the posters, and coordinate with production and recording technicians.

Prerequisites: (MUSC 417 or MUSC 413) and MUSC 415 and MUSC 314.

Co-requisites: MUSC 418.

MUSC 476
Health Issues and the Professional Musician
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The study, practice, performance, creation, and production of music necessitate repetitive processes that make musicians prone to a number of physical and mental ailments. Students identify and understand common ailments that frequently affect professional musicians, examine the importance of physical and mental fitness in the prevention of these ailments, and investigate a variety of resources, techniques and strategies to manage and/or cope with stresses inherent to the profession.

Prerequisites: MUSC 361 or MUSC 271.

MUSC 482
Independent Study
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-1)

This course presents an opportunity for fourth-year students who wish to pursue in-depth advanced studies in their primary area of interest (research and writing, composition, performance, recording). With the guidance of a faculty supervisor, students will produce a publishable document suitable to the discipline under study as the primary outcome of this course. Students are required to submit a formal proposal and obtain the written approval of the chair of music in order to be eligible to enroll in this course. NOTE: Upon successful completion of the first attempt at MUSC 482 and permission from the chair of music in consultation with the faculty supervisor, students may repeat this course for credit in order to continue and develop their projects.

Prerequisites: 90 credits of BMus courses including MUSC 123 and 124.

MUSC 498
Performance Ensemble
1.5 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

MUSC 498 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term VII of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire. NOTE: MUSC 498 is required only for the BMus Performance major, and is optional for the Composition and General routes.

Prerequisites: MUSC 397.

MUSC 499
Performance Ensemble
1.5 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

MUSC 499 fulfills the performance ensemble requirement in Term VIII of the Bachelor of Music. Through focused independent practice, weekly rehearsals and public performances, this course provides each student the opportunity to develop and interpret repertoire drawn from jazz and contemporary popular music. Based on an audition process, students are placed in an appropriate ensemble under the directorship of a music faculty member. The ensembles vary in instrumentation and size, which are determined by stylistic specificity and repertoire. NOTE: MUSC 499 is required only for the BMus Performance major, and is optional for the Composition and General routes.

Prerequisites: MUSC 498.