Academic Calendar

PSYC – Psychology

PSYC 100
Applied Introductory Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to the field of psychology and to the application of psychological concepts and methods. Specific topics include an overview of modern day psychology and its history, the application of psychological research methods to test the validity of conclusions, the biological bases of behaviour, learning through conditioning, memory, motivation and emotion, human development across the lifespan and personality theory, research and assessment.

PSYC 104
Introductory Psychology I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

A survey of natural science topics in Psychology. The course covers the evolution of psychological sciences, research methods, biological psychology, consciousness, principles and development of perception, motivation, learning, and their relationship to the psychological functioning of the individual. If both PSYC 104 and PSYC 105 are to be taken it is recommended that students take PSYC 104 before taking PSYC 105. Note that this course is typically delivered in a 'hybrid' style, with more online components and fewer in-class hours.

PSYC 105
Introductory Psychology II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

A survey of social science topics in Psychology. This course is an introduction to the study of individual and social behavior including individual differences in behaviour, thought, intelligence, human development, personality, social behaviour, stress responses, as well as psychological disorders and their treatment. If both PSYC 104 and PSYC 105 are to be taken it is recommended that students take PSYC 104 before taking PSYC 105. Please note that this course is typically delivered in a 'hybrid' format, with more content delivered online and fewer in-class hours.

PSYC 120
Cognition and Self-Regulation
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is intended to provide students with cognitive and self-regulation strategies (e.g., motivation, self-efficacy, goal setting) that are critical skills for application within academic contexts. These strategies are based on principles in psychology and education, and are used to build a foundation of skills to enhance learning. Assignments and class exercises emphasize the student's application of cognitive strategies and self-regulation in order to meet course goals.

Prerequisites: Recommendation of the department and consent of program.

Co-requisite: Concurrent registration in a minimum of one 3 credit program course.

PSYC 212
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to experimental and non experimental methods in psychology. Topics covered include philosophy of science; measurement; reliability and validity of methods, measures, and effects; survey design; correlational, experimental, quasi-experimental, longitudinal and single-subject designs; biases in experimentation; and research ethics.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105 and STAT 151 or STAT 161 or equivalent.

PSYC 223
Developmental Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Many aspects of human nature and behaviour change during the process of human development. This course reviews the physical, sensory, motor and cognitive changes during various developmental stages. Development in infancy, childhood and adolescence is emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105.

PSYC 233
Personality
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this survey of Personality Psychology, the student is introduced to a number of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to the study of Personality. Additionally, assessment methods and research relevant to the study of personality are reviewed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105.

PSYC 241
Social Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of theories and research on topics such as attitudes and attitude change, person perception, attraction, pro-social behaviour, aggression and applied social psychology. Note: PSYC 241 and SOCI 241 may not both be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 105 or in SOCI 100.

PSYC 258
Cognitive Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys a number of topics in cognitive psychology including perception, attention, knowledge representation, memory, learning, language, reasoning, and problem solving.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105.

PSYC 267
Perception
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the theoretical and experimental issues associated with the sensory and perceptual experience of the world. The main emphasis is on understanding basic perceptual phenomena, such as the relation between physical stimuli and experience. To this end, we must consider: The nature of the physical stimuli; the anatomy and physiology of the sense organs and receptors; the anatomy and physiology of the neural paths from receptors to the brain; how the brain processes sensory information; and the procedures used by researchers to obtain information about these systems.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104.

PSYC 275
Brain and Behaviour
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to physiological psychology. Topics include sensation, perception, movement, motivation, memory, cognition, learning, and emotion from a biological point of view.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 (Biology 30 or equivalent is strongly recommended).

PSYC 281
Principles of Behaviour
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the principles of learning and behaviour, with an emphasis on the processes of classical and operant conditioning. Basic research findings are discussed as well as the potential application of those findings to important aspects of human behaviour.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104.

PSYC 301
History of Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Psychology is a relatively young science, but its history is varied, intriguing and extends well beyond the first psychologists. From early philosophy, physiology and medicine, through the dawn of evolutionary theories and radical behaviourism, to the cognitive revolution and modern neuroscience, we examine the trends, competing theoretical perspectives and socio-political influences on the discipline in Western society.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in at least one of PSYC 223, PSYC 233, PSYC 241, PSYC 258, plus one of PSYC 267, PSYC 275 or PSYC 281.

PSYC 306
Sports Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a study of the psychological factors that influence and are influenced by participation and performance in sport, exercise, and physical activity, and the application of the knowledge gained through this study to everyday settings.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in at least one of PSYC 223, PSYC 233, PSYC 241, PSYC 258, plus one of PSYC 267, PSYC 275 or PSYC 281.

PSYC 307
Health Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors affect the efforts people make in maintaining health and addressing illness, the effectiveness with which they cope with and reduce stress and pain, and the recovery, rehabilitation and psychosocial adjustment of patients with serious health problems.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105 plus at least two 200-level PSYC courses.

PSYC 312
Advanced Research Methods
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course emphasizes the following aspects of research methodology: design, analysis, ethics, reporting of results, and issues relevant to various areas of specialization in psychology. The advantages and limitations of particular research designs are explored. Students have the opportunity to gain first-hand experience with different research methodologies along with data collection. Toward the end of the course, students have the opportunity to present the results of original data in various formats. Note: This is a required course for students registered in the honours program.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and consent of the department.

PSYC 324
Infant Development
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course reviews the biological and sociocultural influences on the development of human infants from conception up to the age of three. Research is discussed that has revealed the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial factors that serve to distinguish normal from abnormal developments. In addition, issues of concern to caregivers/parents are explored.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 223.

PSYC 326
Atypical Development
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a theoretical and practical framework for conceptualizing atypical development and psychological disorders of children and adolescents. Prevalent clinical phenomena, treatment methods, approaches to preventing psychological disorders, and promoting optimal development are presented. Developmental, individual, familial, and social factors associated with disruptions in normative psychosocial growth are examined.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 223.

PSYC 328
Adult Development and Aging
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course describes and discusses development from early adulthood through the final stages of life. Topics include lifespan development theories and research methods, age changes in cognitive processes, intellectual functioning and personality, changes in relationships and work, physiological changes, psychopathology associated with aging, death and dying, and psychological services for the adult and the aged.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 223.

PSYC 333
Advanced Personality
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is intended to advance students' understanding of personality theory and research. It provides an in-depth analysis of relevant personality theories, and discusses challenges and controversies in the areas of personality structure and processes.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 233.

PSYC 337
Forensic Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys the topic areas addressed by researchers interested in the interface between psychology and the law. The course examines the participation of psychologists and the application of psychological science within the criminal justice system. Topics may include: psychological factors associated with eyewitness and jury experiences, risk assessment, criminal profiling and police investigations, mental disability and law, and the influence of psychology in the legal system.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105, and in at least two 200-level courses in PSYC .

PSYC 339
Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers an introduction to topics that outline the study of abnormal behaviour. Using an integrated model that encompasses biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives, psychological disorders are examined on a wide range of issues that include assessment, etiology, and treatment. Topics and disorders may include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, eating disorders, substance-related disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 104 and PSYC 105, plus at least one 200-level PSYC course (PSYC 233 or PSYC 275 recommended).

PSYC 350
Human Memory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course reviews theoretical perspectives and empirical research methods that are related to the study of human memory. These provide the foundation for reviewing historical approaches, biological bases, multiple forms of memory (e.g., working, semantic, autobiographical), and everyday applications of memory strategies. In addition, this course also reviews the nature of forgetting, amnesia, memory disorders, as well as several applied memory issues (e.g., memory and reality, memory and the law).

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 258.

PSYC 355
Social Cognition
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on how social interaction is mediated by cognitive mechanisms including perception, attention, memory, thinking, judgments, and reasoning; and it examines the cognition of people, the social situations in which they are encountered and the interpersonal behaviors that arise in those situations. This examination involves reviewing theoretical perspectives (e.g., cognitive, neuroscience, evolutionary) and empirical research on a variety of topics concerning our own and others' thoughts, attitudes, judgments and behaviours in social applications. Note: Both PSYC 241 and PSYC 258 are recommended as prerequisites.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in PSYC 258 or PSYC 241.

PSYC 358
Comparative Cognition
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Cognitive skills and processes differ across species, in ways that are functionally significant. This course explores similarities and differences in memory, decision-making, risk assessment, biological constraints on learning, and various aspects of intelligence across the animal kingdom.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and in either PSYC 281 or PSYC 373.

PSYC 367
Laboratory in Human Perception
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course presents a practical introduction to techniques used to measure perceptual performance. Lectures cover advanced topics in sensation and perception with special emphasis on visual and auditory perception. Students also conduct experiments and complete laboratory assignments that introduce concepts of psychophysical research design and data analysis.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and PSYC 267.

PSYC 370
Human Sexuality
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers a multidisciplinary perspective of human sexuality in a diverse world. Human sexual function is explored from biological and developmental as well as psychosocial and cultural perspectives. There is also a comprehensive discussion of human reproduction and medical aspects of sexual function and dysfunction.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in at least three 300- or 400- level PSYC courses.

PSYC 373
Evolution and Human Behaviour
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behaviour within an evolutionary context. Adaptive physiology, traits, perception, cognition and other behaviours are explored by examining theories, methods and results of research from various fields including psychology, anthropology, economics and biology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in at least two 200-level PSYC courses.

PSYC 375
Applied Neuropharmacology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course focuses on the mechanisms by which clinically active drugs exert their effects. Students gain an understanding of drug action by examining neuropharmacology at molecular and cellular levels of analysis and exploring major neurotransmitter systems in the CNS (central nervous system). The effects of psychoactive drugs on major nervous system functions such as movement, sleep, and memory are reviewed. The pathogenesis and pharmacological management of major neurological and psychiatric disorders are also discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 275.

PSYC 377
Human Neuropsychology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to changes in behaviour and higher mental processes which result from structural changes to the brain. Through the use of clinical examples, the student becomes familiar with the neuroanatomical correlates of normal and abnormal behaviour in humans. The processes of neuropsychological assessment and diagnosis after insults to the brain is discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 275.

PSYC 385
Introduction to Applied Behaviour Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the ways in which principles of conditioning and learning have been applied to areas of human concern. The basic concepts, specific techniques, and ethical issues involved in the field of applied behaviour analysis are surveyed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 281.

PSYC 391
Psychology of Consciousness
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course focuses on the relations between the subjective experience of consciousness and the theoretical concepts from a variety of psychological perspectives, including cognitive science, phenomenology, neuropsychology, developmental processes, evolutionary psychology, cross cultural psychology and transpersonal perspectives. Additionally, various experiences of consciousness are considered including sleep, dreams, drug effects, meditation, hypnosis, daydreaming, paranormal experiences, trance states, and near death experiences.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 233 and at least one additional 200-level PSYC course.

PSYC 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an advanced student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

PSYC 400
Psychology Senior Seminar
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

As a capstone course, the Senior Seminar allows students to integrate and apply the skills and knowledge acquired throughout their earlier training. Students focus on contemporary topics and controversies, including issues relevant to both academic and professional psychologists. Note: This course is required for students completing the Honours program in Psychology. Other Psychology majors in the final year of the program may request permission if space is available.

Prerequisites: Consent of the department.

PSYC 405
Special Topics in Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course provides an in-depth study of a psychology specialization or of a current issue in psychology. The topic for the course varies term to term and topics are posted in the department and on the department website prior to registration. Specific prerequisites for each topic are also posted, and students are advised to check the descriptions prior to requesting permission from the Chair. In general, these topics are suitable for students in the 3rd or 4th year of their studies.

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

PSYC 408
Psychology of Well-being
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

The scientific study of well-being focuses on the nature, development, and impact of thoughts, emotions, behaviours, strengths of character, environments, institutions, and societies that foster well-being and a meaningful life. This course examines historical and theoretical perspectives on the study of well-being and contemporary research on such topics as positive affect, resilience, self-regulation, mindfulness, and positive organizations. It also examines applications of well-being research to clinical psychology, physical health, and other domains.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and at least two 300- or 400-level courses in PSYC .

PSYC 423
Topics in Development
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course provides an in-depth study of a topic in developmental psychology. The theoretical, methodological and applied issues are emphasized. The topic for the course varies year to year and is announced prior to registration. Possible topics include the role of parents in development, prenatal development, infancy, adolescence, cognitive development, social development, physical development or ecological theories of development.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 223.

PSYC 431
Psychometrics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an overview of theories, principles, and applications of psychological testing and assessment. The focus is on standardized psychological tests in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, personality, interests, and attitudes and values.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 339 and STAT 151.

PSYC 435
Introduction to Clinical Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course examines the profession of clinical psychology, including topics such as clinical assessment and diagnosis, clinical judgment and decision making, psycho-therapeutic and community interventions, and professional ethics.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 339.

PSYC 437
Topics in Forensic Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this course, students critically discuss contemporary issues in forensic psychology in a seminar-based format. Material is drawn from both historical and current primary resources, with emphasis on research literature that explores theoretical and empirical approaches to the topic area. Evaluation is largely based on class presentations, participation, and written assignments. Topics vary from year to year, and may include (but are not limited to) psychopathy, deception, eyewitness memory, risk assessment, sexual and violent offenders, mental illness and crime, malingering, and ethical and legal issues in forensic psychology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 337.

PSYC 438
Psychological Interviewing
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course concerns the study and development of professional helping skills. Topics include the helping relationship, interviewing skills, listening skills, confrontation skills, ethical and legal decision-making, and prevention of professional burnout. Please note that a large portion of the course involves role-playing exercises and participation in these exercises counts for a significant portion of one's grade. Note: With consent of the department, PSYC 435 may be permitted as a co-requisite.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 435, plus at least two of PSYC 326, PSYC 377, PSYC 385, PSYC 431, PSYC 456.

PSYC 439
Psychology Field Placement
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-9)

In this course, students will be assigned to a psychologist in a public, private, or non-profit program where they apply their knowledge of abnormal psychology in a supervised field placement in the community. The student is involved in a project, that significantly contributes to the organization's clinical practice (e.g., program manual, guidelines for practice) or to the organization's research endeavours (e.g., evaluation of a service within the program). Note: This course does not fulfill the 400-level credit requirement of the Psychology Major and Minor. The number of placements may be limited in any given term and therefore course enrolment will be contingent on the student's grade in these two courses and on the student's personal interests and skills. Certain placements may require other course prerequisites or co-requisites, depending on the nature of the field placement (e.g., PSYC 312, PSYC 431, PSYC 435, PSYC 438, or PSYC 456).

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 339 and PSYC 212, and consent of the department.

PSYC 440
Practice of Teaching in Psychology
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Students learn the skills and expectations associated with teaching psychology at the university level. They function as a teaching assistant and are mentored by various faculty members in the Department of Psychology. Throughout this course, they attend workshops and lectures on teaching methods, evaluation methods, detecting and deterring academic dishonesty, and ethics associated with the practice of teaching. Students are also expected to lead scheduled tutorial sessions and collaborate with a supervising instructor as well as with a TA coordinator.

Prerequisites: Department consent.

PSYC 449
Topics in Social Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course offers an in-depth study of a specific topic in social psychology. The theoretical, methodological and applied issues are emphasized. The topic for the course varies year to year and is announced prior to registration. Possible topics include eyewitness testimony, prejudice and discrimination, media influences on aggression, and interpersonal attraction.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and PSYC 241.

PSYC 456
Cognitive Assessment
3 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course covers the fundamentals of cognitive assessment, including test administration, scoring, interpretation, and report writing. The techniques and tools for evaluating several areas of cognitive functioning including intelligence, attention, memory, language, perception, learning, and complex cognitive processes such as critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity are surveyed. The Wechsler tests (e.g., WAIS-IV, WISC-IV, WPPSI-IV, WASI) and academic achievement measures are highlighted in this course.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 339.

PSYC 467
Special Topics in Perception
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this course, students critically discuss contemporary issues in sensation and perception in a seminar-based format. Material is largely drawn from both historical and current primary resources, with an emphasis on research literature that explores links between neural mechanisms and perceptual performance. Evaluation is largely based on class participation and written assignments.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and in PSYC 267 or PSYC 275.

PSYC 473
Advanced Evolutionary Psychology
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

Students examine theory and evidence related to evolutionary psychology as applied to humans and other animals. In addition to analysis of journal articles and other primary sources, students replicate several studies in the laboratory in order to see first-hand some typical research methods associated with the field.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 212 and PSYC 373.

PSYC 475
Comparative Neuroanatomy
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This is an advanced course in neuroanatomical circuitry, examining CNS (central nervous system) functions at molecular, cellular, and systems levels. The anatomy and functions of various tract systems and nuclei are compared across species. Fundamental concepts of nervous system organization, such as adaptation, lateral inhibition, and columnar organization of the cortex are discussed. The course features a combination of lectures and seminars based on readings of primary empirical literature. This course includes lab work in the gross CNS anatomy of a variety of species as well as microscopic examination of brain sections.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 275 and a minimum grade of C- in at least two of PSYC 358, PSYC 367, PSYC 375, PSYC 377 or consent of the department.

PSYC 496
Individual Research
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

In this course, students pursue a research project in depth in collaboration with a member of the department or approved professional in the community. Examples of such projects may include directed reading, library research, and/or laboratory or field experience. A formal review paper, research proposal, research report, annotated bibliography, and/or essay is required. This course is primarily intended for science students.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in at least 15 credits in PSYC at the 200 level including PSYC 267 or PSYC 275, 9 credits in PSYC at the 300 level, and consent of the department.

PSYC 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an advanced student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

PSYC 499A
Honours Thesis I
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty member, students conduct an empirical research project culminating in the Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings. Note: This course is open only to students in the Psychology honours program. Students complete both PSYC 490A and 490B in consecutive terms to attain credit in this course.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 312 and consent of the department.

PSYC 499B
Honours Thesis II
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty member, students conduct an empirical research project culminating in the Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings. Note: This course is open only to students in the Psychology honours program. Students must complete both PSYC 490A and 490B in consecutive terms to attain credit in this course.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in PSYC 312 and consent of the department.