Academic Calendar

ENGL – English

ENGL 010-1
English 10-1
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

This course is an introductory academic stream study in the following: the short story, the essay, the novel, modern drama, Shakespearean drama, poetry, language skills including reading, writing, representation, speaking, listening and viewing. Critical and interpretative skills are emphasized through the understanding and appreciation of literature. This course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's English 10-1.

Prerequisites: Grade 9 Language Arts or equivalent.

ENGL 010-2
English 10-2
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

English 10-2 is an introductory non-academic stream course. It focuses on the study of literature and emphasizes the development of language skills including reading, speaking, writing, listening, viewing and representing. This course emphasizes development of oral and written communication skills, reading for enjoyment and personal growth, and language skills for the everyday world. Basic grammar and sentence building are reviewed. This course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's English 10-2.

Prerequisites: Grade 9 Language Arts or equivalent.

ENGL 020-1
English 20-1
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

This course builds upon the skills and concepts developed in English 10-1. Emphasis is placed on analytical skills through the detailed study of literature, including: the short story, the essay, the novel, modern drama, Shakespearean drama, and poetry. This course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's English 20-1.

Prerequisites: ENGL 010-1 or equivalent.

ENGL 020-2
English 20-2
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

English 20-2 is an intermediate non-academic stream study of literature emphasizing the development of language skills including reading, speaking, writing, listening, viewing, and representing. This course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's English 20-2.

Prerequisites: ENGL 010-2 or equivalent.

ENGL 030-1
Senior Academic English
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

The goals of English 30-1 are to provide an advanced study in the academic stream of literature. This study includes the following genres: the short story, the essay, the novel, Shakespearean drama, poetry and either a modern drama or a film study. Language arts skills, including reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening and representing, are covered with the literature in thematic units. Intensive analytical and interpretive skills are emphasized along with the refinement of formal writing skills.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in ENGL 020-1.

ENGL 030-2
Senior Non-Academic English
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

The goals of English 30-2 are to provide an advanced study in the non-academic stream of literature. This study includes the following genres: the short story, the essay, drama, film, poetry and the novel. Language art skills, including reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and representing, are emphasized. A variety of literature is studied in thematic units. As well, a unit focuses on employment skills. Primary focus in this course is placed on comprehensive and clear communication.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of D in ENGL 020-1 or ENGL 020-2.

ENGL 086
ELP for University - Reading and Writing
5 Credits          Weekly (7-0-0)

This course is intended to provide intensive English reading and writing preparation for post secondary studies. The course challenges the advanced student to complete authentic assignments and master advanced level material in English. An integrated approach is used in which students practice reading and writing skills. Independent thinking is encouraged through questions for analysis following readings. The focus of the course is on a wide range of academic content and extensive practice in English. Test taking strategies and study skills are also included. Information is presented to students in forms that challenge their language abilities. As in university courses, readings present problems and competing points of view. Students are asked to work with and analyze ideas and to use communication of these ideas as a means of improving their English.

Prerequisites: EAL Placement Test (Reading/Writing 86) or IELTS 5.

ENGL 087
ELP for University - Listening and Speaking
5 Credits          Weekly (7-0-0)

ELP for University - Listening and Speaking is intended to provide intensive English listening and speaking preparation for post secondary studies. The course challenges the advanced student to listen to authentic lectures, documentaries and other high level material in English. Independent thinking is encouraged through questions for analysis following lectures. The focus of the course is on a wide range of academic content and extensive practice in English. Information is presented to students in forms that challenge their language abilities. The information is often intentionally controversial in order to stimulate discussion. As in university courses, lectures present problems and competing points of view. Students are asked to work with and analyze ideas and to use communication of these ideas as a means of improving their oral English skills.

Prerequisites: EAL Placement Test (Speaking/Listening 85) or IELTS 5.

ENGL 102
Analysis and Argument
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course helps students to develop the academic writing skills they use throughout their university studies. The essay is the most important genre in this course, but students may also study works from other genres. By analyzing, summarizing, synthesizing, and critiquing a variety of texts, students learn how to develop their own analyses and arguments with appropriate and correctly documented primary and secondary sources. A thorough review of grammar and sentence structure is a key component of this course. Note: Students should not register in more than one first-year English course per term.

ENGL 103
Introduction to Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Building on the writing skills students developed in ENGL 102: Analysis and Argument, ENGL 103 continues to develop critical thinking and writing skills applicable across the university curriculum through intensive reading and analysis of literary texts.   In addition to a minimum of one play, novel, or novella, students analyze works from other literary genres.  With this exploration of the variety and forms of literature, ENGL 103 covers the basics of literary analysis, research and reading skills imperative to all university disciplines.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 102.

ENGL 108
Introduction to Language and Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course combines instruction in writing with the study of the essay and the short story. Students may also study other forms of literature such as articles, poems, and drama. This course aims to increase students' appreciation of literature and to give them practice in academic writing. This course is not to be taken by students in Arts, Science, or Education. Note: Students should not register in more than one first-year English course per term.

ENGL 111
Communications
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course aims to help students improve all their communication skills: writing, reading, speaking, and listening. The main emphasis, however, is on writing skills. Students write an expository and a persuasive essay, summarize written text, and apply principles of clear and correct writing to their own compositions. Students learn research and documentation strategies and strengthen and expand their writing skills so that they can write more effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students may choose from a number of delivery options that include classroom and online sections. Notes: 1) This course is for students in Certificate and Diploma programs; 2) Students should not register in more than one first-year English course per term. 3) This course cannot be used to meet the requirements of the BA or BSc degrees.

ENGL 199
Writing for Engineers
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is designed to develop the student's ability to write expository, analytical, technical, and persuasive prose. Instruction and practice are integrated with the study of prose models drawn from modern essayists. A review of basic grammar is included. Note: This course is restricted to students in University Transfer Engineering.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Engineering Transfer Program.

ENGL 205
Rhetoric and Textual Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

English 205 is an introduction to the rhetorical tradition and to the fundamental ways in which rhetoric has informed English literature and literary criticism. The devices and schemes of rhetoric--from the level of the sentence to that of overall argument--give shape to both writing and thinking about writing. Students learn to write analytically about the rhetoric of texts and cultural artifacts in various modern settings. The course stresses the development of analytic skills that are central to the study of literature.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103, ENGL 133 or 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL.

ENGL 207
Sentence Style and Textual Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

English 207 is an introduction to the fundamental elements of Modern English in relation to the art of sentence writing. Students explore the relation between style and grammar in a variety of contexts and learn to write analytically about the elements of sentence style in modern texts as well as to parse and edit their own sentences. The course stresses the development of analytic skills that are central to the study of literature.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103, ENGL 133 or 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL.

ENGL 211
Business Communication
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on effective problem-solving approaches in business writing. Letters, memos, emails, and reports, often presented in case study formats, aid in developing expertise in gathering and analyzing data, writing with a clear sense of purpose, and writing with a reader's needs clearly in mind. Although the principles of clear, concise business communication are covered, the main emphasis is on practical applications of these concepts. Note: This course is for students in Certificate and Diploma programs.

Prerequisites: ENGL 111.

ENGL 215
Sports in Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores the intersection of literature, sports, and culture. Students read a selection of sports-themed literature across a variety of genres, including novels, graphic novels, short stories, poetry, literary journalism, biography, autobiography, and film. Selected texts represent a diverse range of sports and approaches.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103 or in six credits of university ENGL.

ENGL 218
Reading Gender
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers students the opportunity to read literature in various genres and media dealing with issues, experiences, and representations of gender and sexuality—e.g., women’s writing and queer writing. The specific approach is, in any given year, dependent on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 111, 108, 199.

ENGL 219
Readings in Speculative Fiction
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to a representative sampling of science fiction and fantasy. Students will examine the way these two genres emerge from the broader category of speculative fiction in the late nineteenth century and then develop into a host of subgenres during the twentieth and twenty-first. From classics in early science fiction and fantasy to contemporary cyberpunk and steampunk, the course explores the style and function of fiction that speculates on worlds both possible and impossible.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 240
The Bible as Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

From the Middle Ages to the present, writers have incorporated allusions to both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament to enrich their texts. A grasp of the significance of these allusions deepens a reader's understanding and appreciation of many of the major works in English literature. This course focuses on prominent texts in the Bible such as Genesis, the Book of Job, Ecclesiastes, the Gospels, Revelation, and selected psalms and proverbs.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 243
Genesis of English Literary Forms: Old English to late Renaissance
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to genres and literary forms that emerged during the early development of English Literature. Students read a selection of texts from the Old English through late Renaissance periods and are introduced to literary analysis at a level beyond the first-year level. Potential texts include Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and the Towneley plays, as well as the writings of people like Gower, Marlowe, Donne, and Spenser. Students also learn how to write analytically about literature.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103 or in six credits of university ENGL.

ENGL 282
Introduction to the Short Story
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the main generic elements of the short story. Students read a selection of stories from the mid-nineteenth through early twenty-first centuries and are introduced to the basics of narrative theory. Students also learn how to write analytically about fiction. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in the former English 206.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 283
Introduction to the Novel
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students study the main generic elements of the novel in English. Students read landmark novels from the eighteenth through twenty-first centuries and are introduced to the basics of narrative theory. Students also learn how to write analytically about novels.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 284
Introduction to Drama
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students read a selection of plays from the last two and a half thousand years. This is a genre course in drama, introducing students to the diverse forms of dramatic literature (mostly from the Western canon) and to a number of major playwrights. The course focuses on elements of dramatic structure, aesthetics, and genre, within the context of theatre history and cultural history more broadly. Students will learn how to write analytically about plays and playwrights.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 285
Introduction to Poetry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students read a selection of mostly short English poems from the last thousand years. This is a genre course in poetry; it approaches the very broad and historically malleable genre of poetry through the basic elements of poetic language and form. Students also learn how to write analytically about poems. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in the former English 293.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 286
Introduction to Literary Non-Fiction
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course students study various forms of literary non-fiction, such as the memoir, the personal/familiar essay, biography, travel literature, and literary journalism. Selected works are drawn from across a range of national literatures and time periods, with an emphasis on modern texts. Students are introduced to the basics of narrative theory and key theoretical issues related to literary non-fiction. Students also learn how to write analytically about literary non-fiction.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 288
Introduction to Film Narrative
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students study the main generic elements of narrative in film. Students are exposed to those aspects of cinematic storytelling that cannot be adapted by or from other media (such as the novel) while also exploring film’s various inheritances and influences.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103 or in six credits of university ENGL.

ENGL 297
Academic Essay Writing
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

ENGL 297 aims to increase students' ability to write and understand non-fiction expository prose, including academic writing. Students study style and rhetoric, the relationship between form and content, the theory and practice of composition, and the processes of revision to improve their academic writing skills. This is not a remedial course in grammar or in basic essay writing skills, though there may be some review of these matters; rather, the class focuses on honing students' expository writing and critical reading, writing, and analytical skills. Revising, editing, and essay workshopping may constitute a significant component of class time. While specific writing assignments may vary from section to section, all students write a total of 6000 words, including at least one in-class essay. A major research assignment may also be included. There is no final examination. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in ENGL 299.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 307
The History of the English Language
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course traces the history of English from its ancient Indo-European and Germanic roots to the Early Modern Period. By examining representative texts from Old, Middle, and Early Modern English, students learn how English spelling, pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, and syntax have evolved. English 307 stresses the development of analytic skills that are central to the study of literature.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ENGL 103, ENGL 133 or 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL.

ENGL 319
Earlier Medieval English Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the poetry and prose of one of the longest, richest, and most significant periods of English literature. From the world of Beowulf to the Anglo-Norman court, from Old English epic and elegy to early medieval lyric and romance, the themes and forms from this period have reverberated throughout English literature and inspired countless writers down to our own time, including Tolkien and Lewis.  Students read most works in translation, although some early Middle English works may be read in the original.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 320
Later Middle English Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the literature of fourteenth and fifteenth-century England by examining a selection of poetry, prose and drama from one of the richest periods of English literature.  From tales of chivalry to Arthurian adventure; romance to religious mysticism; lyrical love poetry to witty satire and bawdy humour, this period has near-unrivalled diversity and depth and is crucial for understanding much of how English literature develops in subsequent centuries.  Students read most works in the original Middle English.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 324
Chaucer
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the greatest poets in English literature.  Chaucer's place in English literature is central; his poetry in its rich diversity has influenced writers in English from Shakespeare to Tolkien.  The Canterbury Tales are justly considered his masterpiece, but just as accomplished and equally influential are the early dream visions and the great love poem Troilus and Criseyde.  Despite the passage of time, Chaucer's works in their humour, compassion, and beauty remain fresh, accessible, and, in many ways, surprisingly contemporary.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 336
Studies in Shakespeare
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the range and depth of Shakespeare's drama through the attentive reading of a variety of plays. Comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances allow students to understand Shakespeare's thought and the dramatic genres in which he wrote. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in the former English 239 or 338.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 337
Topics in English Renaissance Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a senior-level course that examines Renaissance literature through a more detailed study of a particular topic.  The topic in any given year is determined by the instructor.  Examples of topics include, but are not limited to, genre-based approaches (such as Renaissance Drama excluding Shakespeare or the Englishing of the Sonnet), thematic approaches (such as the status of women or the portrayal of mental illness) or specialized topics (such as the portrayal of political conflict in 16th-century political pamphlets, religious themes in metaphysical poetry, or sexuality in Cavalier literature). For specific information on the current offering, contact the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 340
Studies in 17th Century English Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The seventeenth century was a period of revolution and remarkable literary experimentation. The decades between 1600 and the restoration of the monarchy experienced dramatic social change, religious upheaval, a regicide, scientific discovery, and expanding colonization of the “New World.” This period also produced some of the most influential works of English literature. The course examines a representative range of poetry and prose by writers as diverse as Donne, Jonson, Marvell, Herbert, Wroth, Bacon, Bunyan, Behn, Hobbes, Burton, Cavendish, Walton, and Winstanley.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 341
Augustan Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students study the authors, works, and genres that were predominant in the Augustan Age and broader Neoclassical Period, between 1660 and 1785. This course includes a selection of drama, fiction, essays, and poetry by eighteen-century writers such as John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Samuel Johnson.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 342
Topics in the Long 18th Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students focus on a single topic in eighteenth-century literature, such as a particular genre (drama, poetry, the novel, prose), author, group of authors, region, or theme. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 348
Milton
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the achievements of John Milton, in both prose and in verse. The course primarily focuses on the major works of Milton: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes, but it also examines a select number of Milton's minor poems and prose works.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 350
Topics in Romantic Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Conventionally book-ended by the French Revolution in 1789 and the beginnings of modern democratic reform in 1832, the Romantic period in Britain was a time of intense social and political upheaval. This course acquaints students with the diverse literature of the period in relation to its complex and volatile literary, intellectual, and historical contexts.  Each iteration of this course focuses on a single topic within Romantic literature, such as a single genre, theme, or generation of authors. The specific topic and approach depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 352
Early Victorian Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In the literature of this earlier Victorian period marked by energetic and momentous change, writers conveyed a multitude of doubts about religious faith and changing gender roles, while also voicing moral quandaries about class privilege and imperial rule.  This course explores selected fiction, poetry, and non-fiction (from 1832 to 1870) in the context of the dominant ideological concerns which show Victorians as self-consciously modern and engaged in vigorous self-scrutiny.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 353
Later Victorian Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the late nineteenth-century reaction to the aesthetic, religious, and sexual mores of the preceding ""high"" Victorian period.  The closing century's apocalyptic tenor finds expression in metaphors and themes of the period's literature, concerns embodied discursively in response to the New Imperialism, the New Woman, and the Aesthete or Decadent.  The course looks at selected fiction, poetry, and non-fiction (from about 1860-1900) in the context of contemporary cultural anxieties about social upheaval, gender crisis, and moral turmoil, the dialectic of change enacted in Pre-Raphaelitism and the Aesthetic and Decadent movements of the 1890s.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 358
19th Century American Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a study of representative literary texts from the period by a variety of major authors.  Novels, poetry, and essays are all represented. Authors include some of the following: Philip Freneau, J. F. Cooper, J. R. Lowell, E.A. Poe, R.W. Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Henry Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Fanny Fern, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Mark Twain, Henry Adams, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, and Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 361
Early 20th Century American Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students study representative American texts spanning from the early twentieth century to the cold war. A broad range of early to mid-twentieth century genres is considered – e.g., novels, short stories, poems, plays, and films. The works are analyzed closely and placed within their historical and cultural context – especially the wars and development of “the American Century.” Students are exposed to authors as varied as Chesnutt, Lowell, Larsen, Dreiser, Eliot, Faulkner, Moore, Hemingway, Hurston, Stein, Wharton, Ellison, and O’Connor.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 362
Contemporary American Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students study representative American texts spanning from the Cold War to the present moment. A broad range of late-twentieth and twenty-first century genres are considered – e.g., novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, and films. The course focuses on narrative innovations as well as the persistence of traditional American styles in a rapidly changing social, cultural, and ideological environment. Students are exposed to authors as varied as Ginsberg, Barth, Plath, Reed, Brooks, Pynchon, Barthelme, Kingston, Erdrich, Morrison, Acker, Mamet, Franzen, Miller, Tarantino, Eggers, and Danielewski.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 364
Topics in 20th and 21st Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

By maintaining a focus on a single topic related to literary and narrative production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, this course allows students to supplement ENGL 361, ENGL 362, ENGL 365, ENGL 366, ENGL 376, & ENGL 381. Each iteration of the course is organized around a single author, group of authors, genre, region, or theme. The specific topic and approach, in any given year, depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 365
Early 20th Century British & Anglophone Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course involves a close study of representative British and Anglophone texts from the first half of the twentieth century, the modernist period. A broad range of genres is considered, such as novels, short stories, poems, plays, and films. Works are situated in terms of their engagements with the cultural, social, political, scientific, and technological changes of the period. Writers studied may include but are not limited to Mulk Raj Anand, W. H. Auden, Elizabeth Bowen, Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, E. M. Forster, Christopher Isherwood, Henry James, James Joyce, Hugh MacDiarmid, D. H. Lawrence, Dorothy Richardson, Jean Rhys, George Bernard Shaw, Evelyn Waugh, and Virginia Woolf.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 366
Contemporary British and Anglophone Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys representative British and Anglophone texts from the second half of the twentieth century and beyond. A broad range of genres may be considered, such as novels, short stories, poems, plays, and films. These works are situated in terms of their engagements with the cultural, social, political, scientific, and technological changes of the period. Writers studied may include but are not limited to Martin Amis, Julian Barnes, A. S. Byatt, Anthony Burgess, Angela Carter, Ian Fleming, Seamus Heaney, Tony Harrison, Kazuo Ishiguro, Hanif Kureishi, Doris Lessing, David Lodge, Hilary Mantel, Ian McEwan, Iris Murdoch, V. S. Naipaul, Harold Pinter, Salman Rushie, Zadie Smith, Muriel Spark, and Tom Stoppard.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 368
Topics in Race and Gender
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

By focusing on a broad theme or topic, this course allows students to look closely at the way in which issues of race and/or gender inform and are informed by narrative representations. While students may consider theoretical debates associated with problems of race or gender, the course concerns itself primarily with literary works that engage in, run alongside, or frustrate those debates. Each iteration of the course is organized around a single, author, group of authors, genre, period, locale, and/or theme. The specific topic and approach is, in any given year, dependent on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in six credits of university ENGL, not including ENGL 108, ENGL 111, or ENGL 199.

ENGL 374
Early Canadian Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course involves a close study of representative Canadian texts from the beginnings of Canadian literature through first half of the twentieth century. A broad range of genres may be considered, such as novels, short stories, poems, plays, and films. Works are situated in terms of their engagements with the cultural, social, political, scientific, and technological changes of the period. Students study Canadian authors from a variety of backgrounds.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 376
Contemporary Canadian Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course covers key developments in Canadian culture and literary works during this period when our literature came of age. Major authors achieved international acclaim, a rich diversity emerged in literary themes and forms, and marginalized narratives of class, race, gender, and the environment moved to the literary centre. These developments occurred against the backdrop of the maturing of Canada into one of the globe's most peaceful and economically stable multicultural nations.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 377
Studies in Indigenous Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course covers a number of works of indigenous literature, ranging from collected oral folk tales and myths of the pre-contact period to print literature and films of the post-contact period. The course covers how indigenous works of the pre-contact period convey indigenous cultural world-views that contrast sharply with that of settler or colonial culture. The course examines indigenous texts and films of the post-contact period as resisting colonial culture and promoting the survival of tribal cultures and languages. The course clarifies indigenous perspectives on historical issues such as residential schools, missing and murdered indigenous women, and the treatment of indigenous peoples in the non-indigenous justice system. The course also considers the approaches advocated in indigenous texts on the way forward, for indigenous and non-indigenous peoples, toward restitution and reconciliation.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of university ENGL , except ENGL 108, ENGL 199.

ENGL 381
Topics in Post-Colonial Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

By focusing on a theme or topic, this course allows students to closely read literature from one or more regions that have experienced colonization. The course primarily concerns itself with literary works, although some introductory readings in postcolonial theory may supplement and/or complement the selected literature. Each iteration of the course is organized around a single author, group of authors, genre, theme, geographical area, or literary or linguistic tradition. The specific topic and approach is, in any given year, dependent on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department. Note: This course may be taken up to two times, provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C-in 6 credits of university ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111 and ENGL 199.

ENGL 389
Topics in Children's Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers various studies in the realm of Children's literature. Individual iterations of the course can focus on classics of children's literature, folktale and children's literature, or the child in literature. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 100 level University ENGL except ENGL 108, ENGL 111, and ENGL 199.

ENGL 391
Topics in Literary Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

By focusing on a broad theme or topic associated with literary and cultural theory, this course encourages students to consider the way in which theoretical debates inform the practice of narrative production and study. In any given iteration of the course, students are exposed to a broad range of primary texts by influential theorists—e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Marx, Freud, Kristeva, Mulvey, Said, Butler, Hayles, and Žižek. Each iteration also functions as both an historical survey of influential theoretical texts and an introduction to theory as a tool for literary interpretation. The specific topic and approach is, in any given year, dependant on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 200 or 300 level university courses.

ENGL 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrolment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

ENGL 401
Studies in Genres
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to focus on a single genre or to compare two or more genres. Because genre is such a fluid term, the works studied and approach to genre will depend in any given year on the interests and expertise of the instructor. The course could, for example, focus on a specific type of poem, such as the sonnet or the dramatic monologue, on a specific type of novel such as the gothic novel or the bildungsroman, on a specific type of drama, such as Restoration Comedy, or on a specific type of non-fiction, such as the essay or biography. Alternatively, students could focus on a genre such as satire and study a variety of types of satiric literature that could include poems, essays, stories, novels, and drama.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 402
Studies in Authors
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course focuses on the works of a single author. In any given year, the author studied and the approach to the works depends on the interests and expertise of the instructor. Through a close examination of the works of a single author, students get a better sense of the social and cultural context in which the author lived and worked. Students also strengthen their knowledge of how the central ideas and techniques of the author developed and changed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 405
Topics in Canadian Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more depth and detail one or more authors and/or genres of Canadian literature. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 481
Post- Colonial Theory and Practice
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course surveys the key works in post-colonial theory, validating the status of post-colonial literature as a vibrant segment of contemporary writing in English. Seminal thinkers and significant scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Edward Said, Aimé Césaire, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, and Robert Young are covered. Postcolonial theory is meaningfully used as a tool for in-depth analysis of major primary texts, representing various regions, political perspectives, and cultural affiliations. While most of the works studied are written in English, postcolonial texts translated into English may be included. Authors such as Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, Nadine Gordimer, Arundhati Roy, V.S. Naipaul, and Ahdaf Soueif are studied.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 489
Literary Themes, Traditions, and Phenomena
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study works that deal with a single theme, such as the outsider or decadence; or works that exemplify a single tradition, such as naturalism or the Arthurian tradition; or works that exemplify a particular phenomenon, such as imagism or literary forgeries.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 491
Early and Later Middle English
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more detail one or more authors and/or genres of Early and Later Middle English. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 492
Elizabethan/17th Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study one or more authors and/or genres of Elizabethan and seventeenth century literature.  Students have the opportunity to design and undertake  independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period.  In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depends on the expertise of the instructor.   For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 493
Restoration/Eighteenth Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more depth and detail one or more authors and/or genres of Restoration and Eighteenth Century literature. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C - in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 494
Nineteenth Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more depth and detail one or more authors and/or genres of nineteenth century literature. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depends on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C - in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 495
Twentieth Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more depth and detail one or more authors and/or genres of twentieth-century literature. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author(s) studied and the approach to the works depend on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300- level ENGL courses.

ENGL 496
Intersections - Theory and Culture
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

Focused on the ways in which critical theory exposes, critiques, and/or participates in literary and cultural movements, this course provides students with the opportunity to study critical theory within the context of the cultural trends it defines and exemplifies. Sections could be organized around any number of topics, including (but not limited to) the rise and fall of deconstruction, the death of the author, communal individuality, hypertext and post humanity, race and performativity, literary Marxism, the text and the unconscious, discourse and power, postmodern subjectivities, and the ethical turn.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ENGL 267, 391, 392, 393, or 394 and in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level ENGL courses.

ENGL 497
Twenty-First Century Literature
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course gives students the opportunity to study in more depth and detail one or more authors and/or genres of twenty-first century literature. Students have the opportunity to design and undertake independent research, write a major paper, lead seminar discussions, and strengthen their grasp of theoretical concepts relevant to literature written during this period. In any given year, the author/s studied and the approach to the works depend on the expertise of the instructor. For detailed information about the current course offering, please consult the English Department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 12 credits of 200- or 300-level English courses.

ENGL 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an advanced student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

ENGL 499
Honours Thesis Project
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course gives fourth-year English Honours students the opportunity to write a substantial research paper of 5000-7500 words and to deliver a conference-length version of that paper before an audience in a formal setting. Students have regular consultations with their supervisor during this project, usually once per week during the term or twelve hours total. Note: English 499 is a degree requirement for Honours English students. Students must be in the final year of an Honours English program or obtain consent from the Chair of the Department of English.