Academic Calendar

CHEM – Chemistry

CHEM 020
Chemistry 20
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

The material covered in this course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's Chemistry 20. Topics include matter as solutions (acids, bases and gases), quantitative relationships in chemical changes, chemical bonding in matter and the diversity of matter (organic chemistry).

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of a D in SCIE 010.

CHEM 030
Chemistry 30
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

The material covered in this course is equivalent to Alberta Learning's Chemistry 30. Topics include basic concepts of chemistry, atoms, molecules and ions, stoichiometry, oxidation/ reduction reactions, electrochemistry, acids and bases, chemical energetics, nuclear chemistry and chemical kinetics.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in CHEM 020.

CHEM 101
Introductory University Chemistry I
3 Credits          Weekly (4-3-0)

This course serves as a foundation for all subsequent chemistry courses. Atomic properties as they relate to the periodic table are considered, along with quantum mechanics for hydrogen-like orbitals and electron configurations. The course provides an introduction to bonding theories as they apply to the stability, molecular geometry and intermolecular interactions of atomic, ionic and molecular species. Topics include chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, classification of chemical reactivity, gases (both ideal and real) and thermochemistry. Note: Credit may be obtained in only one of CHEM 101 or CHME 103.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 30.

CHEM 102
Introductory University Chemistry II
3 Credits          Weekly (4-3-0)

This course emphasizes the importance of chemical equilibrium as it applies to gases, acids and bases, solubility and precipitation reactions and complex ion formation. Also studied are kinetics (rates of reactions, differential and integrated rate laws, the Arrhenius equation), catalysts, thermodynamics (spontaneity, entropy, free energy), and electrochemistry (balancing redox reactions, calculating standard and non-standard cell potentials), with emphasis on some practical applications related to batteries, corrosion and industrial processes. A special topic, selected by the instructor, is covered if time permits. Note: Credit may only be obtained in one of CHEM 102 or CHME 105.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 101.

CHEM 211
Analytical Chemistry I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-4-0)

This course surveys the principles, methods, and experimental applications of classical analytical chemistry, emphasizing solution phase equilibria, titrimetry, volumetric laboratory skills, and the evaluation of experimental data. This course includes examples of organic and inorganic analysis.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102 or CHME 105.

CHEM 213
Analytical Chemistry II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-4-0)

This course emphasizes the principles, methods, and experimental applications of separation techniques, atomic and molecular spectrometry, electrochemistry, and evaluation of experimental data. It also includes examples of organic and inorganic analysis and use of the analytical chemistry literature.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 211.

CHEM 232
Inorganic Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the bonding models used for inorganic compounds (main group and transition metal elements). Reactivity patterns of inorganic compounds are considered to gain an understanding of the role of thermodynamics and kinetics in their preparation and reactivity. Physical methods that are used to characterize inorganic compounds are discussed. The relevance and importance of inorganic compounds in the environment, industry and biology are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102.

CHEM 241
Biophysical Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course applies the fundamentals of physical chemistry to the life sciences. The course centres on the principles and methods employed (i) to perform the material and energy balances in biophysical and biochemical processes, and (ii) to determine the general conditions that govern the self-organization of matter in the steady state and that contribute to maintain homeostasis. This course provides the framework for understanding the bulk properties and transitions of pure matter and its mixtures; phenomena at the surface; transformations and transactions of matter and energy, storage of electric charge; systems' response to change in external and internal conditions; as well as physical, chemical and electrochemical equilibria. Note: Completion of BIOL 107 prior to taking CHEM 241 is recommended.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102 and in one of MATH 113 or MATH 114.

CHEM 242
Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course is about the use of methods to design experiments, analyze measured data, and devise quantitative models in chemistry. These models are applied to explain observations, to optimize experimental conditions, and to predict and control the direction, extent and rate of physicochemical processes. Internal energy, enthalpy, entropy and free energy functions are applied to perform the materials and energy balances of reactions, phase transitions, transport of matter, and coupled processes thereof. Focus is placed on nonequilibrium and steady-state processes. The laws of energy conservation, entropy production, and equilibrium are applied to phenomena occurring inside systems consisting of several components and phases. Fundamentals cover the methods to determine the kinetic parameters and mechanism of chemical reactions.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102 and MATH 114.

CHEM 252
Forensic Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course provides an introduction to crime scene investigations, forensic science, and forensic chemistry. The main focus of the course is the scientific basis for the analysis and interpretation of crime scene evidence. The methods of chemical analysis, including the theoretical and practical aspects of these techniques for common types of forensic evidence such as fingerprints, DNA, and trace evidence, will be discussed. Laboratory quality control, processing, evaluation, interpretation, and reporting of analytical laboratory results will also be discussed. Students will gain hands-on experience in the use of a range of analytical techniques in the laboratory through the examination of simulated crime scene evidence.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102.

CHEM 261
Organic Chemistry I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course covers the molecular structure and reactivity of organic compounds based on their functional groups and is intended for students who have obtained at least three credits in Introductory University Chemistry. The course provides an introduction to nomenclature, three dimensional structure and physical properties of organic compounds as well as reaction mechanisms and infrared spectroscopy. Although most organic functional groups are discussed, the focus is on the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and alkyl halides. Mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides are discussed. Note: Credit can only be obtained in one of CHEM 161 or CHEM 164 or CHEM 261.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 101 or in CHME 103, or greater than 90 per cent in Chemistry 30.

CHEM 263
Organic Chemistry II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

The nomenclature, structure, physical properties, synthesis and selected reactions of the basic functional groups in organic chemistry are discussed. Functional groups covered include alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid derivatives. The presence of these functional groups in natural products is emphasized. The application of spectroscopic methods for structure determination in simple organic molecules is discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 164 or in CHEM 261.

CHEM 270
Environmental Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

In this course, methods used to identify and quantitatively determine the levels of pollutants in different environmental matrices will be described. Appropriate sampling methods, sample preparation and analysis using various classical and instrumental analytical techniques will be studied. In addition, important environmental issues facing our modern society, including climate change, the loss of the ozone layer and the end of fossil fuels are discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102.

CHEM 311
Advanced Chemical Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-4-0)

This course discusses instrumentation and analytical applications of spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electroanalytical methods. The theory governing each analytical technique and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on choosing the appropriate method for a particular analysis.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of CHEM 213, CHEM 353 or CHEM 370.

CHEM 320
Introduction to Geochemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary science of geochemistry. The first part of the course examines our home planet from a geochemical perspective and includes formation of the Earth and our solar system, the origin of the elements and their distribution within the Earth, and evolution of the crust, mantle and core. An introduction to the essential geochemical tools of thermodynamics and kinetics, isotope geochemistry and trace element geochemistry is also provided. The second part of the course examines the geochemistry of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and covers topics as diverse as the melting and crystallization of rocks to the contamination of our water supplies and the stability of carbonates in our oceans. Note: Credit can only be obtained in one of CHEM 320 or EASC 320.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in EASC 219 and in CHEM 241 or CHEM 242.

CHEM 322
Introduction to Biogeochemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

Biogeochemistry is the study of the chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes and reactions that govern planet Earth. This course provides an introduction to the discipline, focusing on the exchange of energy and elements between the biosphere and the geosphere. The fundamental components of the Earth’s system are examined, including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and geosphere, alongside their evolutionary histories and linkages. Topics include the principle biogeochemical cycles, such as the carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles, and their histories. These cycles are assessed in the context of recent environmental and climate change driven by anthropogenic activities. This course incorporates a multitude of disciplines, spanning geology, chemistry, biology, and environmental science. Note: Credit cannot be obtained in both CHEM 322 and EASC 322.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of CHEM 232, CHEM 261, CHEM 270, or CHEM 372; and in one of EASC 226, EASC 270 or EASC 271.

CHEM 333
Organometallic Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course surveys the basic principles of the organometallic chemistry as they apply to metals of the d-block elements and main group metals. Topics include a survey of ligands and coordination chemistry/geometry of transition metals and main group metals. The properties and reactions of organometallic complexes, and applications of organotransition metal compounds in catalysis, organic synthesis, bioinorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry are reviewed.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 232 and CHEM 263.

CHEM 341
Structural Bioinformatics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course covers three introductory topics of the broad field that bioinformatics comprises today: (i) structural databases, sequence analysis and comparison; (ii) computer simulations; and (iii) prediction of the structure and function of proteins, and their hierarchical classification. Students use computer- and web-based tools to: (i) retrieve, render and visualize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes; (ii) perform pairwise and multiple alignments of polynucleotide and polypeptide sequences to find similarities and homologies; and (iii) build three-dimensional models of the structure of a protein from its sequence by means of threading, homology modelling, and molecular dynamics simulation.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 241 or in PHYS 250.

CHEM 342
Materials Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course is about the relationships among processing, structure, properties, performance, applications and sustainability of materials. It covers the materials classed as metal alloys, crystals, glasses, ceramics, plastics and composites. It examines the structural assembling of materials at the macroscopic, microscopic, nanoscopic and atomistic scales of size. The interatomic and intermolecular bonding at play in the assembling of such structures is analyzed. How mechanical, optical, electrical, surface, bonding and catalytic properties arise from the structural assemblage is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods of processing chemical substances to manufacture materials with desired structure and properties, as well as on integration of materials in technological devices.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 241 or CHEM 242, or in CHEM 102 and PHYS 224.

CHEM 353
Forensic Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course examines the theory and practice of forensic chemistry. The course focuses on chemical analytical techniques used for the detection, identification, and comparison of forensic evidence such as illicit drugs, poisons, gunshot residues, fire accelerants, and explosives. The theory of a variety of analytical techniques along with their scope and limitations is embedded in this discussion. The practical application of these techniques is considered with reference to appropriate examples and forensic case studies. This is further reinforced in the laboratory, where students will gain hands-on experience in the use of a range of analytical techniques for the investigation of simulated crime scenarios. The structure and function of forensic chemistry laboratory services and the key issues of cross-contamination and laboratory quality control and quality assurance will be examined.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 261, and in either CHEM 211 or CHEM 252.

CHEM 362
Advanced Organic Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course is designed to build upon the concepts introduced in Chemistry 261 and Chemistry 263, offering a more advanced and sophisticated insight into the physical properties and chemical reactions of organic compounds. A focal point will be the chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Mechanistic and multistep synthesis approaches will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 263.

CHEM 364
Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Students will be introduced to pharmaceutical drug discovery and the pivotal role played by chemistry. The principles and processes involved in modern drug design and development are presented and, throughout, are emphasized by reference to compounds in current clinical usage. Particular emphasis is placed on cancer therapeutics and antiviral agents. Recent advances in the use of computational and combinatorial chemistry in drug design are discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 261.

CHEM 372
Environmental Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

The chemistry of natural environmental process and the impact of anthropogenic activity on those processes will be examined. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, including photochemical reactions, ozone depletion and urban air pollution; aquatic chemistry, including complex equilibria, buffering, and oxidation and reduction; and an introduction to sources and fate of organic and inorganic pollutants. In the laboratory, students will gain hands on experience in common methods of environmental testing and remediation. Note: Credit cannot be received for both CHEM 270 and CHEM 372.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 102 and CHEM 261.

CHEM 380
Process and Flow Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course provides an introduction and training in the different types of chemical and physical methods, and equipment that may be employed in process and flow chemistry. The use and installation of process analytical technology/chemistry is also explored. On-line and in-line monitoring of chemical processes is strongly emphasized, both in the lecture and the laboratory environment.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C– in CHEM 211 and CHEM 263.

CHEM 391
Applied Spectroscopy
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course focuses on the practical aspects of preparing samples for analysis, collecting and analyzing data, and characterizing organic, inorganic and biological compounds. Methods are explored from a theoretical and practical perspective and include X-ray crystallography, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CHEM 291 and CHEM 391.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 261.

CHEM 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-72)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with a faculty member to explore a specific topic in depth through research or through directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

CHEM 410
Industrial Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

An introduction to the principles and practice of industrial chemistry with a special emphasis on modern and emerging processes. Selected industrial processes will be discussed, such as production of primary petrochemicals and their associated secondary products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals, dyes, perfumes, and pesticides. Plant design, catalysis, and pollution control will be emphasized, with insights from the principles of green and environmental chemistry. This course will include presentations by industrial chemists, and optional tours of chemical plants and industrial laboratories.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 300-level CHEM course.

CHEM 441
Molecular Modelling
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This introduction to molecular modelling deals with the application of quantum mechanical methods to compute structural models, molecular and bulk properties of matter, and the mechanisms by which molecules interact and react. Students use up-to-date software to build, render and visualize molecular structures generated with wave function and density functional methods; to compute molecular properties and spectra of substances; to design reaction mechanisms of uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and to compute their associated rate constants. Students devise structural and computational models for acid-base, redox, enzyme and surface reactions relevant to life, environment and technology.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in CHEM 341.

CHEM 472
Advanced Environmental Chemistry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course presents an advanced study of anthropogenic pollutants in the environment. Fate and transport processes of legacy and emerging anthropogenic pollutants, including important physio-chemical processes, such as partitioning, hydrolysis, photolysis and biotransformation, are discussed on both a local and global scale. Understanding of these processes is applied in the context of environmental modeling. In the laboratory, students gain hands on experience with the techniques used to determine the environmental fates of pollutants via investigations of their physio-chemical properties. Credit cannot be received for both CHEM 370 and CHEM 472.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C– in CHEM 261 and in either CHEM 270 or CHEM 372.

CHEM 495
Special Topics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course involves reading, discussing and critically evaluating current research on specialized topics in chemistry. Topics covered vary with the interests of students and faculty. Students should consult with faculty members in the Department of Physical Sciences for details regarding current offerings. Note: This course is intended for students in the final year of their degree. This course may be taken up to two times for credit.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of B- in a 300-level CHEM course and permission of the department.

CHEM 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-72)

This course permits a senior-level student to work with a faculty member to explore a specific topic in depth through research or through directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.