Academic Calendar

MATH – Mathematics

MATH 010C
Math 10 Common
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Mathematics 10 Common is equivalent to Alberta Education's Math 10C. This course is intended to prepare students for further studies in high school mathematics. Students who successfully complete Math 10 Common can either continue on to Math 20-1 and then Math 30-1 or Math 20-2 and then Math 30-2. Topics studied in Math 10 Common include measurement, right triangle trigonometry, powers, irrational numbers, polynomials and factoring, functions and relations, coordinate geometry, and linear systems of equations. Emphasis is placed on understanding, application, and effective communication of mathematical concepts.

Prerequisite: Completion of Math 9, Math 10 Prep or equivalent.

MATH 010R
Mathematics Preparation 10
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Math Prep. 10 is designed to meet the needs of Grade 10 students who wish to enroll in Math 10 Common but do not possess the prerequisite skills. Topics include: fractions and integers, rates, ratios, proportions, percents, exponents, linear equations, polynomials, measurement and geometry.

Prerequisites: Grade 9 math or equivalent.

MATH 020-1
Mathematics 20-1
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Math 20-1 is equivalent to Alberta Education's Math 20-1 course. Most students who enroll in Math 20-1 intend to continue onto Math 30-1. Some of the topics studied in Math 20-1 include quadratic functions and equations, radical expressions and equations, rational expressions and equations, the absolute value and reciprocal of functions, linear and quadratic inequalities, sequences and series, law of sines and cosines, and angles in standard position. Problem solving and application of concepts are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in MATH 010C.

MATH 020-2
Mathematics 20-2
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Math 20-2 is equivalent to Alberta Education's Math 20-2 course. Most students who enroll in Math 20-2 intend to continue onto Math 30-2. Some of the topics studied in Math 20-2 include rates and unit rates, scale factors, inductive and deductive reasoning, laws of sines and cosines, radical expressions and equations, quadratic functions and equations, standard deviation, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and margin of error. Problem solving and application of concepts are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in MATH 010C.

MATH 030-1
Mathematics 030-1
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Mathematics 030-1(Math 030-1) is equivalent to Alberta Education’s Mathematics 30-1 course. Students who enrol in Math 030-1 will most likely continue onto post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus. Some of the topics studied in Math 030-1 include trigonometric functions, equations, and identities, transformations and inverse of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, polynomial functions and equations, rational and radical functions, permutations, combinations, and the binomial theorem. Problem solving and application of concepts are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in MATH 020-1.

MATH 030-2
Mathematics 030-2
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Mathematics 030-2 (Math 030-2) is equivalent to Alberta Education’s Mathematics 30-2 course. Students who enroll in Math 030-2 will most likely continue onto post-secondary programs that do not require the study of calculus. Some of the topics studied in Math 030-2 include set theory, fundamental counting principal, permutations and combinations, probability of mutually exclusive and non-mutually exclusive events, probability of dependent and independent events, rational expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, polynomial and sinusoidal functions. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and application of concepts are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in MATH 020-1 or 020-2.

MATH 030P
Pure Mathematics 30
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Pure Math 30 is equivalent to Alberta Learning's Pure Math 30. It is designed as a preparation course for university mathematics. The course includes the following topics: trigonometry, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, combinatorics, probability and statistics.

Prerequisites: MATH 020P or equivalent.

MATH 031
Math 31
5 Credits          Weekly (6-0-0)

Math 31 is equivalent to Alberta Learning's Math 31. The course focuses on the study of calculus and linear algebra, both as ends in themselves and as tools in developing problem solving skills and analytical thought processes.

Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of D in MATH 030-1.

MATH 099
Precalculus Mathematics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course reviews and extends the mathematical concepts needed to be successful in university level calculus. Topics include graphing, equations of lines, inequalities, review of elementary algebra, functions, and trigonometry.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 or Mathematics 30-2.

MATH 100
Calculus I
3.5 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of calculus. The students learn about rectangular coordinates, analytic geometry, transcendental functions, inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and applications, Taylor polynomials, integration and applications. Note: This course is restricted to Engineering students. Credit can only be obtained in one of MATH 100 or MATH 113 or MATH 114.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 and Mathematics 31.

MATH 101
Calculus II
3.5 Credits          Weekly (3-1.5-0)

This course provides a continuation of the study of Calculus. Students learn about techniques of integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolution, applications to physics and engineering, first order ordinary differential equations (separable and linear), infinite series, power series, Taylor expansions, polar coordinates, rectangular coordinates in R3, parametric curves in the plane and space (graphing, arc length, curvature), normal, binormal, tangent in R3. Note: This course is restricted to Engineering Program students. Credit can only be obtained in one of MATH 101 or MATH 115.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 100.

MATH 102
Applied Linear Algebra
3.5 Credits          Weekly (3-1.5-0)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of linear algebra and some of their applications. The course content includes vectors and matrices; solutions of linear equations; equations of lines and planes; determinants; matrix algebra, linear transformations and their matrices; general vector spaces and inner product spaces; orthogonality and Gram-Schmidt process; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; and complex numbers. Note: This course is restricted to Engineering students. MATH 100 may be taken as a co-requisite with consent of the department. The course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in MATH 120 or MATH 125.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in MATH 100.

MATH 114
Elementary Calculus I
3 Credits          Weekly (4-0-0)

This course examines the fundamental concept of limits, differentiation and integration. Limits and differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions are studied along with applications including related rates, optimizing and curve sketching. This course concludes with a study of Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and substitution. Note: Students who have received credit in MATH 113 or MATH 100 may not take MATH 114 for credit.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of 80% in Mathematics 30-1, or successful completion (50% or better) of Mathematics 31, or Minimum grade of C- in MATH 099, or successful completion of the MATH 114 gateway exam.

MATH 115
Elementary Calculus II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course investigates the differentiation and integration of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Indeterminate forms and improper integrals are studied, as well as the techniques and applications of integration. Note: Credit can only be obtained in one of MATH 115 or MATH 101.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 114.

MATH 120
Basic Linear Algebra I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This is an introduction to the basic notion and methods of linear algebra. Topics covered are: systems of linear equations, vectors in n-space, vector equations of lines and planes, dot product and orthogonality, matrix algebra, invertibility of matrices, determinants, general vector spaces, basis and dimension, subspaces of n-space, rank, introduction to linear transformations, introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and real world applications. NOTE: This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in either of MATH 102 or MATH 125. Students who are planning to transfer into Engineering or students planning to take further courses in algebra should take MATH 125 rather than MATH 120.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 or a minimum grade of 80% in Mathematics 30-2.

MATH 125
Linear Algebra I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This is an enriched introduction to the basic notion and methods of linear algebra. Topics covered are: systems of linear equations, vectors in n-space, vector equations of lines and planes, dot product and orthogonality, matrix algebra, invertibility of matrices, determinants, general vector spaces, basis and dimension, subspaces of n-space, rank, introduction to linear transformations, introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors, applications. NOTE: The course covers the same basic topics as MATH 120, however it is a more rigorous course, and selected topics and applications are covered in more depth. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in either of MATH 102 or MATH 120. Students who are planning to transfer into Engineering or students planning to take further courses in algebra should take MATH 125 rather than MATH 120.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1.

MATH 160
Higher Arithmetic
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course emphasizes the development of clarity in the understanding of mathematical ideas and processes, communication of these ideas to others, and application of these ideas to problem solving. Both inductive and deductive methods are explored in the study of elementary number theory, numeration systems, operations on integers and rational numbers, and elementary probability theory. Note: This course is restricted to Elementary Education students.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 or Mathematics 30-2 or successful completion of the gateway exam.

MATH 170
Mathematics for The Liberal Arts
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines various mathematical concepts and problem solving techniques and provides functional mathematical literacy for those majoring in liberal arts programs. Students will learn how to solve a wide variety of problems with different mathematical methods with emphasis on logic and relevance, historical connections as well as the beauty and purpose of mathematics. Note: This course fulfills the analytical component of the Arts degree.

MATH 200
Fundamental Concepts of Math
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to axiomatic systems and mathematical proof. These ideas are developed using examples taken primarily from set theory and number theory.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 120 or MATH 125.

MATH 214
Intermediate Calculus I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course completes the study of single-variable calculus and introduces students to the basic concepts of multi-variable calculus. Topics in single-variable calculus include area and arc length of plane curves defined by parametric or polar equations, infinite series, and power series. Topics in multi-variable calculus include: vector functions and space curves, functions of several variables and partial derivatives with applications.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 115.

MATH 215
Intermediate Calculus II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course continues the study of multivariable calculus. Topics include: curves, tangent vectors, arc length; integration in two and three dimensions; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; line and surface integrals, Green’s, divergence and Stokes’ theorems; first and second order linear differential equations.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 214.

MATH 222
Discrete Mathematics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, covering coding, cryptography, induction and recursion, and graph theory. Secret codes, error-detecting and error-correcting codes are introduced. Induction and recursive definitions are described. The Eulerian tour is used to illustrate graph definitions and properties.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level MATH course.

MATH 225
Linear Algebra II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the theory of vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations and diagonalization. Specific topics of study include Euclidean n-space, spaces of continuous functions, matrix spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, QR-factorization, least squares method, change of basis, eigenspaces, orthogonal diagonalization, quadratic forms, matrices of transformations and similarity. Various applications are presented.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 120 or MATH 125.

MATH 228
Algebra: Introduction to Ring Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the theory of rings including integral domains, division rings, ring homomorphisms, ideals, quotient rings, fields of quotients, rings of polynomials, irreducible polynomials, Euclidean domains and fields. Specific topics include the well-ordering axiom, the Binomial Theorem, the Euclidean algorithm, the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, and the Chinese Remainder Theorem.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in either MATH 200 or MATH 241 and in either MATH 120 or MATH 125.

MATH 241
Geometry
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course explores Euclidean Geometry as an axiomatic system, based on invariance under the group of isometries (rigid motions). The material includes congruence, parallelism, similarity, and the theory of measurements based on continuity axioms. The notion of circumference is introduced and treated rigorously. Problem solving is an important component of the course. The problems include proofs, finding loci, and constructions. Transformations in the Euclidean plane are used as a problem-solving tool. Additional topics include elementary logic, equivalence relations, and proofs by induction.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level MATH course.

MATH 260
Logic and Reasoning for Teachers
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores the basic notions and methods of Algebra, and introduces the students to reasoning and problem solving in different areas of mathematics like geometry, elementary graphing, and combinatorics. Note: This course is restricted to Elementary Education students.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 160.

MATH 310
Real Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-1)

This course presents a rigorous treatment of limit processes in one variable. Topics include real numbers, sequences, limits, continuous functions, differentiation, the Riemann integral and the topology of the real number system.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 214 and in either MATH 200 or MATH 241.

MATH 311
Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of single variable complex analysis. The main topics include analytic functions, complex power series, Cauchy’s Integral Theorem, Cauchy’s Integral Formula, the residue theorem and applications to improper real integrals and Fourier transforms.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 215.

MATH 312
Probability Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers a rigorous approach to probability theory. Topics covered include basic concepts of probability theory, univariate and multivariate probability distributions, discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, moment generating and characteristic functions, different types of convergence and relationships between them, and basic limit theorems. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit has been obtained in STAT 312.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 215, STAT 265, and in one of MATH 120 or MATH 125.

MATH 320
Elementary Number Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Elementary methods in number theory are presented. The following topics are included: divisibility, linear Diophantine equations, prime numbers, the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, congruences, the Chinese remainder theorem, Fermat's little theorem, arithmetic functions, Euler's theorem, primitive roots, quadratic residues.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 200.

MATH 321
Fields and Modules
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course builds on the knowledge of rings and fields obtained in MATH 228, and introduces the student to basic module theory. Topics studied include finite fields, quadratic number fields and algebraic field extensions, the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, modules, and Noetherian rings.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 225 and MATH 228.

MATH 330
Ordinary Differential Equations
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course provides techniques for solving ordinary differential equations and systems of first order equations and investigates the qualitative nature of solutions of dynamical systems. Topics covered include first order equations, linear equations of higher order and linear dynamical systems with constant coefficients.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 120 or MATH 125 and in MATH 214.

MATH 335
Numerical Methods
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

This course presents numerical methods for solving problems in linear algebra, non-linear equations, interpolations, approximation of functions, differentiation and integration. The numerical algorithms are illustrated using an appropriate computer programming language and specific libraries.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 214 and in one of MATH 120 or MATH 125 or CMPT 101.

MATH 341
Modern Geometries
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores Euclidean and Non-Euclidean plane geometries from the viewpoint of Klein’s Erlangen program, based on invariance under groups of transformations in the extended complex plane. Mobius geometry is introduced, and Euclidean, hyperbolic, and elliptic geometries are studied as its subgeometries. The differences in axiomatics and results of the Euclidean and Lobachevsky – Bolyai geometries are discussed based on the disc model of hyperbolic geometry. Elliptic geometry is considered as another Mobius subgeometry.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 241, and in either MATH 120 or MATH 125.

MATH 350
Introduction to Graph Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course discusses graphs and digraphs, paths and cycles, trees, planarity, colouring problems and matching problems. In addition, graph algorithms and some applications to other disciplines are studied.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in either MATH 120 or MATH 125, and a minimum grade of C- in either MATH 200 or MATH 222.

MATH 361
History of Mathematics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course is a survey of the history of mathematics from ancient times through the development of calculus and the origins of modern algebra in the nineteenth century. It emphasizes the events that led to the development of modern and classic mathematics from a problem solving perspective. Biographies of famous mathematicians complement the abstract concepts of mathematics.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any two 200-level MATH courses.

MATH 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic from mathematics in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

MATH 410
Analysis and Topology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course continues the study of Analysis begun in MATH 310 and examines differentiation and integration in Rn. Specific topics covered will include: implicit and inverse functions theorems, Fubini’s theorem, differential forms, and the generalized Stokes’ theorem.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 225 and MATH 310.

MATH 420
Groups and Galois Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a treatment of symmetry, beginning with groups, then developing the ideas of Galois theory, and finishing with the quintic equation.  Topics include groups, normal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's Theorem, the Class equation, permutations, group actions, the Sylow theorems, splitting fields, Galois extensions, the Main Theorem of Galois theory, Kummer extensions, cubic, quartic and quintic equations.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 321.

MATH 430
Applied Dynamical Systems
3 Credits          Weekly (3-1-0)

This course presents an introduction to dynamical systems related to ordinary differential equations in the continuous case, or to difference equations in the discrete case. Elementary existence and uniqueness theorems and stability are considered for linear and non-linear systems of ordinary differential equations. Periodic solutions, chaotic attractors, an introduction to bifurcation theory, basic notions of discrete dynamical systems, and deterministic chaos are discussed. Applications are chosen from biology, physics and other areas.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 310 and MATH 330.

MATH 436
Introduction to Partial Differential Equations
3 Credits          Weekly (3-2-0)

The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the mathematical modeling of classical physical systems such as vibrating systems, diffusive processes and steady state phenomena. The course starts with a rigorous introduction of the first-order and linear second-order partial differential equations (PDEs) followed by elements of Fourier analysis. The method of characteristics is used to find and interpret classes of solutions for the above models. The lab component will familiarize the student with formal and numerical manipulations of PDE’s. The main scope of the lab is to enable the student to visualize and discuss solutions for classical models for PDE’s.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in MATH 310 and MATH 330.

MATH 495
Special Topics in Mathematics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course students examine an advanced topic of specialization in mathematics. Topics covered vary from year to year. Consult with faculty members in Mathematics for details regarding current offerings. Note: This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of B- in a 300-level Math course and permission of the department.

MATH 498
Advanced Independent Study in Mathematics
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits a senior-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic from mathematics in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.