Academic Calendar

HIST – History

HIST 100
Introduction to History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the practice of history and the methods by which historians research and think about the past using selected topics in world history as a foundation for study. In learning about each topic, students are encouraged, through practical exercises and assessment strategies, to think historically and to acquire the essential research skills which underpin history as a discipline. As well, questions are asked about the quality and authenticity of sources, the nature of historical causation, and the role of the historian in the evaluation and interpretation of evidence. Overall, this course is designed to hone students' critical abilities, interpretive skills, writing abilities and to stimulate intellectual curiosity through analysis of selected world history topics.

HIST 101
Foundations of the Modern World before c.1500 C.E.
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to what historians call the ‘modern’ world in the period between c.500 and 1500 C.E. The underlying theme of the course is that this period has seen an increasing interconnectedness between human societies, leading to the globalised world in which we live. Students study topics such as trade patterns, intellectual exchange, religious movements, health, wellness and the environment, state and empire building, war, conquest and diplomacy, and the spread of disease, goods and ideas. They learn to understand the processes that increased global interaction, both voluntary and forced, and spawned conflicts, both economic and political.

HIST 102
Foundations of the Modern World from 1500 C.E. to the Present
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to what historians call the ‘modern’ world in the period from the sixteenth century to the present. The underlying theme of the course is that this period has seen an increasing interconnectedness between human societies, leading to the globalised world in which we live. Students study topics such as trade patterns, colonialism, imperial expansion and contraction, religious, artistic and intellectual change, the immense socio-economic transformation springing from industrialisation, and modern ideologies like liberalism, socialism, nationalism and racism. They learn to understand the processes that increased global interaction, both voluntary and forced, and spawned conflicts, both economic and political.

HIST 204
Judaism, Christianity, Islam
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the intertwined histories of three major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. These three traditions share several core assumptions about the identity of God and the relationship between divinity and humanity. At the same time, they have also developed in unique ways over the millennia, so that each tradition both differs from the others and contains rich diversity within itself. By focusing on cultural, intellectual, and political exchange across these traditions, this course prepares students to understand how such exchange continues to shape our world today.

HIST 205
Medieval Europe
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the student to the important events, developments and themes in medieval European history from Charlemagne to the Black Death. Discussion of social and political topics such as feudalism and manorialism, growth of legal systems, political theory and the rise of medieval states, the Crusades, medieval warfare, and the Holy Roman Empire are connected to cultural and intellectual themes related to Muslims in Iberia, urbanization, reform of the Catholic Church, and the rise of universities.

HIST 206
Britain Before the Black Death
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the student to the important events, developments and themes in medieval British history from the end of the Roman period in the fifth century to the crises of the fourteenth century. Focusing on a period rich in mythology surrounding larger than life characters such as King Arthur, Alfred the Great, Strongbow, Saint Margaret, William Wallace and Robert the Bruce, this course explores the historical context behind these figures by examining the political development of the British Isles and the foundation of the relationships forged between the four nations of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

HIST 209
Early Modern European History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of European history from the Renaissance to Napoleon. Often seen as one of the most dynamic periods in European history, early modern Europe experienced rapid social, cultural, political and economic change that created new opportunities and challenges for every level of European society. In this course, students consider the evolving economy and society, the basic facts of life for the majority of Europe’s peoples. They learn how the religious and intellectual unity of western culture fragmented and dissolved under the impact of new ideas and examine the nature of politics, the rise and fall of empires and the emergence of nation states.

HIST 210
Modern European History: 1789 - Present
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of European history from the French Revolution to the present. As such it is also, however, a history of the wider world affected by the "European ascendancy" of the nineteenth century, and whose cataclysmic destruction has shaped much of the twentieth. The course starts with the twin upheavals of the French and Industrial Revolutions, charts the political and socio-economic fallout from these in the shape of new ideologies, new nation-states and new social classes, and shows how European imperialism transformed the globe down to 1914. The course then analyses the self-destruction of the old European order in two world wars, the emergence of a continent physically but also psychologically divided by the Cold War, and the revolutionary developments which, since 1989, have permitted these two halves of Europe to re-converge, a process complicated to this day by the bitter legacies of the past.

HIST 211
England: From Tudor to Glorious Revolution
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the student to a period in English history characterized by dynamic political, social, economic and cultural change. Between 1485 and 1688 England became a protestant nation, witnessed the birth of the nation state, expanded its economic capacity, and engaged in colonial imperial activities. Using two significant political ‘revolutions’ as a temporal framework, this course explores the birth of modern English society.

HIST 212
Britain 1689-1914
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Between 1689 and 1914, Britain achieved political stability, created a constitutional monarchy and widened the franchise to include the common people. Britain successfully faced the external challenges of the Seven Years War, the American Revolution and the Napoleonic wars and entered into a new phase of imperialist activity in Africa and Asia. It struggled with the challenges posed by urbanization, the industrial revolution, and the social problems these engendered. The middle class came to prominence and family and gender roles were transformed. This survey course examines the major events and developments in the history of Britain in this exciting period with the specific topics in any year selected by the instructor.

HIST 214
The Celtic Crescent before 1801
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the development of the Celtic regions of the British Isles and Ireland prior to the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. Some historians have argued that it is in this period that the modern sense of Celtic identity has its roots. Important to this development is the fact that Ireland, Wales, and Scotland are often subsumed under the title “Celtic” and shared a common experience through their interactions with the English. Yet, most scholarship and popular culture portray the Celtic regions of Britain in an undifferentiated manner. This course explores the unique histories of the Celtic regions of the British Isles as well as their shared cultural links and experiences within the region. Topics may include: Roman Britain, King Arthur, the Celtic Church, Picts and Dalriada, the Vikings, Strong Bow in Ireland, Manx Kingship, Owain Glyndwr, Kin Networks, Celtic Identity, Art and Language, Plantation and Colonialism, Resistance, and Incorporation.

HIST 215
Modern France
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course situates developments in French literature, philosophy and art in the context of the nation’s tumultuous political history from the eighteenth century to the present day. It traces changing conceptions of class, nationality, gender, selfhood and aesthetics through the momentous cultural and political ruptures that have characterized life in France and its colonies since the great revolution of 1789.

HIST 250
American History to 1865
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of American history to the Civil War. Beginning with the early colonial ventures in Virginia and New England, the course traces the development and expansion of the American federation through the War of Independence, the Mexican-American war, and the Civil War. The American political experiment with constitutional democracy and the development of the party system are examined. The course also identifies and examines important social issues including the treatment of Aboriginal people, slavery and the rights of women.

HIST 251
American History Since 1865
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of American history since the Civil War.  Beginning with Reconstruction, this course traces the social, political, and economic transformation of America as it developed into a global superpower.  The industrial and consumer-based society forms the backdrop for the political, social, and geo-political changes: from populism and progressivism to the Reagan revolution, xenophobia to civil rights, isolationism to the Iraq War.

HIST 260
History of Canada to 1867
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys Canadian history before 1867. Attention is given to both the French and English empires, the conflicts that occurred, and the social and political development of the colonies. Special consideration is given to the interactions between these imperial and colonial societies and Aboriginal people. The expansion of the European empires to the Pacific coast is also covered. The course concludes with the Confederation process in British North America.

HIST 261
History of Canada Since 1867
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys Canadian history since 1867. It examines the people, forces and events that have shaped the history of this country, its society, its institutions and its identity. This course provides not only a foundation for further study in Canadian history but also the knowledge necessary for effective citizenship.

HIST 281
Asia Since A.D. 1500
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of Asian history since 1500. The focus is on East Asia, including China and Japan, with complementary sections on Southeastern and Southern Asia. The emphasis is on the socio-cultural, economic, and political history of the region as well as relations with other countries and empires in the global community.

HIST 282
History of Modern Japan
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course presents a survey of modern Japanese history beginning with the Meiji Restoration in 1868. Focusing on the major political, social, economic, military, and diplomatic themes, Japan's evolution as a modern state will be examined. Major topics may include the birth of liberal democracy, imperialism and empire, militarism, the Pacific War, and Japan's postwar rise as an economic superpower.

HIST 291
Topics in Political and International History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course surveys political and international world history with a focus on a particular conceptual topic. The topics are broad-based themes which have political or international consequences; the time period of study may vary from the late middle ages to the present. Examples of topics that might be covered are warfare, state formation and nation-building, the exercise of imperialism both formal and informal, global trade, or the development of political ideologies like liberalism, nationalism and socialism.

HIST 292
History of Women in Europe and North America
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Women's history focuses on the experiences of women in the past but it is more than that. It addresses questions of roles and expectations, issues and challenges, ambitions and contributions. Starting from an evaluation of how scholars have conceptualized women and gender, this course examines the history of women in a particular period and geographic area selected by the instructor. Using contemporary feminist theories that construct gender, this course seeks to enhance the student's understanding of how prescriptions and customs of womanhood, socially bounded and culturally constructed, shaped the day to day lives of both elite and labouring women in historical periods since the middle ages.

HIST 294
History of Science and Technology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys important themes, traditions, people and institutions of Western science, technology and medicine. It familiarizes students with an important aspect of European/Western culture and serves as an introduction to the history of science and technology. This course emphasizes how individuals and societies have understood and explained the natural world and their place in it, and how they have approached and justified the investigation of that world.

HIST 300
Making History: Theory and Methods in History
3 Credits          Weekly (2-0-1)

History is an academic discipline whose practitioners make a systematic study of the complexity, variety, and change of human ideas, behaviours, and actions across time. Historians gather, assess, analyze, and organize information to create knowledge about the past. This course examines the process of making history. It includes discussions about both the nature of historical evidence and the methods historians use. It also introduces students to basic questions and issues concerning the nature of our knowledge of the past.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 100 or 6 credits of senior HIST.

HIST 301
Topics in World History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an intermediate level course that examines world history through detailed study of a particular topic. The topic in any given year is determined by the instructor. Examples of topics include, but are not limited to, broad-based themes such as environmental issues or the status of women, or specialized topics such as the impact of conflict, disease or slavery.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level HIST course.

HIST 304
History of Christianity
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students explore the rich diversity of Christian perspectives that predominated from antiquity through the early modern period. Students work through seminal texts in the history of Christian thought and practice. By exploring more than just the works that were later declared orthodox, students learn about the many alternative Christianities that flourished in the past, ranging from the Gnostics of ancient Egypt to radical reformers leading peasant revolts in early modern Europe. Listening to these alternative voices, while also placing Christian history into intimate conversation with Judaism and Islam, allows students to engage with Christianity not as a closed book, but as an open conversation across the centuries.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 3 credits of 200-level HIST courses.

HIST 306
Urban Europe: City and Society, 1450-1850
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course explores the European “City” as a major site for social, cultural, economic and political exchange and a site wherein urban actors identified with the multiple communities that formed within city limits. Central to the discussion of the European City is the impact that the national and international flow of ideas, culture, people, goods and capital had on urban centres across Europe over time. Topics include urban sights, sounds, and smells; street-corners and squares; community; built environments; gender and agency; occupation and social status; marginalization; demographic change; and urbanization.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 308
Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course explores some of the major themes in the history of Europe from the late fourteenth to the early seventeenth century. Its focus is on cultural, intellectual, and religious history, including the rise of humanism, developments in education, arts and literature, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and philosophical and scientific innovations. This exploration of key moments in European history is set within the appropriate political and social contexts of these developments, including the emergence of the nation state, the rise of printing, significant demographic change, and the beginnings of European overseas empires.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of HIST 100, 101, 205, 209.

HIST 309
Crime and Society in Early Modern Europe
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course investigates some of the major themes in the social history of Early Modern Europe from the onset of the Black Death to the Enlightenment. Students focus on the shifts in social, political, economic, and cultural attitudes that ushered in new ideas on crime and regulation, poverty and social discipline. Lecture topics and assigned reading materials describe how these ideas affected the peoples of Western Europe and contributed to a variety of ways individuals and groups experienced inclusion and exclusion in their communities.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C-in any 200-level HIST course.

HIST 311
British Society, Politics, and Culture, 1450-1750
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course examines the social history of Britain: the lives of its people, both grand and humble. We explore families, courtship and marriage, work and play, gender roles, religion and superstition, crime and punishment, class relations, local and regional identities, poverty and poor relief. Specific topics vary depending on the individual instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 315
Enlightenment and Revolution in France
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the intersection of ideas, institutions and events in France during the revolutionary era. Students are introduced to the art, literature, and philosophy of the French Enlightenment in the context of its key institutions, cultural venues, and figures. After identifying and analyzing the movement’s main currents and critics, students link Enlightenment critiques of absolutism and Old Regime society to both the outbreak of France’s great revolution in 1789 and its descent into Terror. The course concludes by analyzing the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte and the birth of modern nationalism and total war.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in 3 credits of 200-level HIST courses.

HIST 338
Britain as a World Power
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Britain held a position of world dominance from the eighteenth century until the world wars of the twentieth century. It acquired a worldwide empire, sometimes deliberately, but often haphazardly. Britain administered its empire in a variety of ways, sometimes indirectly through local rulers, sometimes quite directly. In this course, students examine Britain's rise as an imperial nation and its relations with other European nations, as well as the process of its decline both as an imperial and a European power.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 340
Diplomacy, War, and Conflict in the 20th Century
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course investigates the origins and consequences of the major military conflicts of the twentieth century. It covers the Great War, the Second World War and the Cold War, as well as the national wars of independence in Asia and Africa, the war for Jammu and Kashmir, the Arab-Israeli conflicts of the Middle East, the Vietnam War and the Gulf War.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 341
Fascism in Europe 1918-1945
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course investigates the phenomenon of fascism in inter-war Europe. The course starts from the premise that a generic fascism did exist, and can be defined, and that its origins and ideological components are traceable, not only to the general crisis following the First World War, but to social and political trends going back into the nineteenth century. The course also explicitly compares fascist movements, and the two fascist dictatorships of Italy and Germany, with the authoritarian regimes which become so prevalent in this period, highlighting both the essential differences between the two phenomena, and also the way in which authoritarianism occasionally borrowed fascist language and imagery. Specific attention is paid to Italian Fascism and German National Socialism, and to the native fascist movements of Eastern Europe.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 102 or HIST 112 or HIST 210 or HIST 340.

HIST 342
The Atlantic World
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Contact among Africans, Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the Americas created an Atlantic World.  The Atlantic Ocean linked the nations and peoples living around its edges, beginning in the 15th century and continuing until the wars of independence and the end of the slave trade in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.  Slaves and slave-traders, soldiers, merchants, sailors, pirates, indentured servants, convicts, settlers, governors and administrators crossed the ocean to encounter a diverse array of New World peoples.  This course examines the lives of these people and the encounters, relationships, exchanges and clashes among these people in their Atlantic context.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 345
Nationalism
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course examines nationalism as a theme in world history. It starts with an exploration of nationalism as a concept: its history, its terminology and some of the theories cited for its emergence. This course examines the scholarly debate as to how far back we can go in identifying nations, the connection between nationalism and literacy, and that between nationalism and socio-economic development. Relying largely on a consideration of nationalism in a European context, the course nevertheless considers extra-European manifestations, including Canadian, American, Indian and Japanese nationalism; it also considers the peculiar phenomenon of "state nationalism", as attempted in the Russian and Ottoman Empires, and what might be called "confessional nationalism", as typified by modern Islamism.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level HIST course.

HIST 352
The U.S. in World Affairs
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the history of American foreign policy during the 20th century providing insight into the process of foreign policy decision making, as well as the ramifications U.S. foreign policy has on nations around the world. Major topics include expansionism, "Big Stick" diplomacy, Wilsonianism, entry into wars, relations with Latin America and the Middle East, as well as the origins, culture, and effect of the events of the Cold War.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 361
Canadian Political History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the political history of Canada since Confederation. Although the federal political system is the central focus of the course, provincial political developments of national importance are not ignored. Among the topics discussed in this course are the Pacific scandal, the Manitoba school question, women's suffrage, the Progressive party and Maritime Rights movement, the politics of unemployment, the rise of Social Credit in Alberta, the formation of the CCF and NDP, Medicare, the Quiet Revolution, the Constitution Debates, and the Meech Lake accord.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 362
History of Alberta
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Alberta occupies a distinct space in the Canadian federation. Created by an act of the federal government in 1905, the province was originally settled by immigrants from Europe who sought opportunities in agriculture and mining. The rural province was transformed by the depression and the discovery of oil and gas. Today it is an urban province that attracts immigrants from around the globe. It also has a distinct political culture. The province has been governed by a series of political dynasties from the Liberals to UFA to Social Credit to the Conservatives. Each of these political dynasties had a tendentious relationship with the federal government and the province's electors have consistently supported political parties that emphasized a decentralized federal regime. This course examines these changes in economic, social, and political conditions to help us better understand Alberta today.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200- level HIST course.

HIST 366
The Canadian West
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the history of the Canadian West. Social, political and economic developments in this region continue to play a central role in Canada's development. Topics include the experiences of Aboriginal people, the region's leadership in social policy related to immigration, women's suffrage and Medicare; the resource-based economy of furs, wheat, timber, mining and oil; and the distinctive political culture and alternative political parties that have emerged in the Canadian West including the Progressives, CCF, Social Credit, and Reform.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level history course.

HIST 367
Canada in World Affairs
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines Canada's diplomatic, military, economic and political role in world affairs. Canada's relationship with the British Empire and the United States receives special emphasis. Attention is also given to the affect of international affairs on domestic social and political issues.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 369
First Nations and Canada
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course examines Canada’s relationship with First Nations from the 1830s to the present. The focus is on the interplay between the aspirations of First Nations, Aboriginal rights, constitutional law, economic and social changes, and the development of government policy. Special attention is paid to the consequences of the policy development for Aboriginal societies and culture.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 260 or HIST 261.

HIST 397
Public History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Public history is a branch of historical work that involves presenting history to the public or working with the public to conduct research and interpret the past. This course introduces students to some of the theories about public history and some of the issues in the field, including ideas about memory and representation, heritage and history, and preservation and interpretation. It examines common sources for public history, including material culture, archives, and oral interviews. It also explores some of the opportunities available in the field of public history.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100 or 200 level HIST course.

HIST 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

HIST 400
Senior Thesis
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this individual study course, students write a major essay and make a conference-style presentation on a specific topic of their choice. This course is open only to History Majors. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 400 and HIST 401. Students desiring HIST 400 must consult with the History Coordinator to select a primary and secondary supervisor.

Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

HIST 401
Senior Research Project
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar course, students conduct research, write a major essay, and make a conference-style presentation on a topic chosen by the instructor. This course is open only to History Majors. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 400 and HIST 401.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 30 credits of senior HIST courses including HIST 300.

HIST 410
Topics in European History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticise and analyse readings on a selected topic in European history. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to one or more of the seminar topics. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200 or 300-level HIST including one of HIST 205, HIST 209 or HIST 210.

HIST 411
Topics in British History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticise and analyse readings on a selected topic in British history. They also prepare a major research paper on a subject related to the course topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200 or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 442
Topics in Imperialism and Colonialism
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticise and analyse readings on a selected topic related to imperialism and/or colonialism. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to one or more of the seminar topics. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 460
Topics in Canadian History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss critique and analyse readings on a selected topic in Canadian history. They also prepare a major research paper related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200 or 300-level HIST courses including either HIST 260 or HIST 261.

HIST 476
Topics in Ancient and Medieval History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique, and analyse readings on a selected topic in ancient or medieval history. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 6 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses, and a minimum grade of C- in ancient HIST courses (CLAS 210, CLAS 314, CLAS 315) or courses as determined by the department.

HIST 490
Topics in Social History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique, and analyse readings on a selected topic in Social History. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 497
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course will permit a senior-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific historical topic in depth through directed reading and research in primary and secondary sources. Note: Enrolment is by consent of the department.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 300 and in 15 credits in 200- or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits senior-level students to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

HIST 499
Field Placement
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-9)

In this course, students are assigned to public history, community, and/or heritage organizations where they apply their knowledge and skills in supervised projects. Note: This course does not fulfill the 400-level course requirement for the history major.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in either HIST 300 or HIST 397 and consent of the department.