Academic Calendar

ZOOL – Zoology

ZOOL 224
Vertebrate Adaptations and Evolution
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the diversity of vertebrates using an evolutionary approach. Morphological, physiological, and behavioural adaptations are related to the life of vertebrates in aquatic and terrestrial habitats are emphasized. Note: ZOOL 224 in combination with ZOOL 324 (Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy) provides a strong understanding of vertebrate biology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIOL 108.

ZOOL 241
Animal Physiology I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-1)

This course is a survey of physiological systems in animals with an emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms that regulate internal water and ions, gases, metabolic rate, and temperature in relation to the external environment. Physiological systems from both invertebrates and vertebrates are studied.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIOL 107.

ZOOL 242
Animal Physiology II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-1)

This course deals with the physiological systems of animals that involve intercellular communication. Focus is on the endocrine, neural, sensory, motor, and immune systems. Examples from both invertebrate and vertebrate animals are used.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIOL 107.

ZOOL 250
Survey of the Invertebrates
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course explores the evolution and ecological roles of major invertebrate phyla. The diversity of body forms and life histories of invertebrates and protozoans are discussed. Various ecological niches of invertebrates are related to functional anatomy. The laboratory displays the diversity and functional anatomy of invertebrates using live and preserved specimens and includes an optional field trip to a coastal area.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in BIOL 108.

ZOOL 324
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course provides a comparative survey of the anatomy of vertebrates emphasizing evolutionary trends and anatomical adaptations for life in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Special emphasis will be placed on fish and mammals. The laboratory involves detailed dissection of vertebrate specimens. Note: credit can only be obtained in one of ZOOL 225 or ZOOL 324.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ZOOL 224.

ZOOL 400
Aquatic Vertebrates
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course examines the evolution and natural history of fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, and mammals in aquatic environments. Topics include behavioural, morphological, and physiological adaptations. Students summarize, interpret, and present scientific literature on ecological and environmental issues of aquatic vertebrates. The laboratory focuses on native species of Alberta.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ZOOL 224 and in one of BIOL 310, BIOL 361, BIOL 367, or ZOOL 324.

ZOOL 401
Terrestrial Vertebrates
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

This course examines the evolution and natural history of amphibians, birds, reptiles, and mammals in terrestrial environments. Topics include behavioural, morphological, and physiological adaptations. Students summarize, interpret, and present scientific literature on ecological and environmental issues of terrestrial vertebrates. The laboratory focuses on native species of Alberta.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ZOOL 224 and in one of BIOL 312, BIOL 367, or ZOOL 324.

ZOOL 425
Entomology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

Insects are the most successful animals on Earth. This course examines their evolutionary history and adaptations that have led to their success. Insect behaviour is examined as it relates to morphology, lifecycle, and ecology to explain how insects can be dominant in diverse ecological situations. The economic, medical, scientific and cultural impact of insects is surveyed. The laboratory emphasizes methods of collecting, preserving, and identifying insect groups.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ZOOL 250.

ZOOL 452
Principles of Parasitism
3 Credits          Weekly (3-3-0)

Using an ecological approach, this course examines the relationships between protozoan, helminth, nematode, acanthocephalan, and arthropod parasites and their animal hosts. The structural and physiological adaptations used by parasites to successfully complete their lifecycles as well as host defensive strategies used to control parasite infections are discussed. Examples of human parasitic infections are used to illustrate these ideas. The laboratory emphasizes morphology, life cycles, behaviour, systematics and evolution of parasites.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ZOOL 250.