Academic Calendar

History - Bachelor of Arts

Overview

Historians record history, craft history, and make history. The past is an exciting place! Our discipline ranges across time and space, from the daily life of peasants to the history of ideas and institutions, from Aztec art to war in Afghanistan. History has few thematic borders and is eclectic in its choice of research methods. Specialized history courses cover such diverse topics as crime in early modern Europe, diplomacy and conflict in the modern world, policy related to Indigenous people in Canada, and many others.

History students learn to make sense of the present by investigating the past. They chart continuities and change across time by observing how individuals and societies respond to different pressures and opportunities. They establish facts and develop and apply concepts. In the process, these master detectives become skilled communicators who know how to gather and organize information, analyze complex issues, and explain their findings clearly and persuasively.

Contact Information

Department of Humanities
Room 7-352, City Centre Campus
10700 - 104 Avenue
Edmonton, AB T5J 4S2
T:780-497-5608

Arts and Science Academic Advising
Room 6-211, City Centre Campus
T: 780-497-4505
E: artsandscience@macewan.ca

The Bachelor of Arts

Faculty of Arts and Science
MacEwan.ca/BA

MacEwan University’s Bachelor of Arts (BA) provides a liberal arts education that allows students to explore a variety of academic disciplines and acquire a broad knowledge base that will prepare them for employment or future post-secondary studies. The degree provides students with breadth, depth, and diversity in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, analytical studies, and fine arts, as well as courses focused on language and literature. BA students study subjects in major and/or minor disciplines and must be familiar with the academic and Faculty regulations and procedures published herein.

General Program Information

The BA program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. The degree emphasizes breadth and depth and has been designed for exceptional flexibility and customization. Students can complete a major and a minor, a double major, or a major and two minors. Students can choose a secondary major in an Arts or Science discipline, but the primary major must be in an Arts discipline.

All newly admitted students enter the BA program as “Undeclared.”  Undeclared means a student has not yet chosen their major(s) and minor(s). Students may declare at any time after being accepted to the BA, and typically, they declare after completing a minimum of 45 credits. The declaration period for noncompetitive majors and minors is between September 1 and February 15 and between September 1 and January 15 for competitive majors and minors. The Arts and Science Academic Advising Office will send information about majors and minors via email and newsletters; please contact the Advising Office if you require further assistance with this decision.

Arts Disciplines

Discipline Major Minor Honours
Anthropology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Classics - ⦿ -
Creative Writing - ⦿ -
Economics ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
English ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Film Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
French - ⦿ -
Gender Studies - ⦿ -
History ⦿ ⦿ -
Philosophy ⦿ ⦿ -
Political Science ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Psychology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Sociology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Spanish - ⦿ -

Science Disciplines 

Discipline Major Minor
Applied Statistics ⦿
Biological Sciences ⦿ ⦿
Chemistry ⦿ ⦿
Computer Science ⦿ ⦿
Earth and Planetary Sciences ⦿
Environmental Sciences ⦿
Mathematics ⦿ ⦿
Physics ⦿
Planetary Physics ⦿
Statistics ⦿

Out of Faculty Minors

Discipline Minor
Accounting Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Arts and Cultural Management ⦿
Business Law ⦿
Business Studies ⦿
Digital Experience Design ⦿
Finance Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Human Resources Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Marketing Minor for Arts and Science ⦿

Laddering a Diploma into the Bachelor of Arts

Students with an accredited diploma can ladder into the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and use some of their diploma coursework towards their degree requirements. If you have questions about the diploma laddering, please visit www.macewan.ca/bastudent or contact artsandscience@macewan.ca.

Preparing for Professional Studies

Students intending to enter professional programs at other universities, such as law and education, can take their pre-professional studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at MacEwan University. For example, a selection of courses facilitates the transition to an after-degree education program or, if the student prefers, transfer to a Bachelor of Education program after completing as many as 60 credits of coursework. Students are advised to consult the admissions requirements for the universities and programs of their choice and to select their MacEwan University courses accordingly. Completing pre-professional courses at MacEwan University does not guarantee admission to the subsequent professional program. Each professional program requires a separate application, and entry is competitive, not automatic.

Degree Requirements

Breadth Requirements

 All Bachelor of Arts degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), Honours, or options. 

Breadth Element Description Credits
Literacy ENGL 102 and 3 credits in university English (not including ENGL 111, ENGL 108, or ENGL 211), and 6 credits in a single language other than English or 6 credits in world literature (COMP 102 and COMP 103) 12
Humanities CLAS, HIST, HUMN, or PHIL 6
Sciences ASTR, BICM, BIOL, BOTN, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, GENE, PHYS, PSYC, SCIE, or ZOOL 6
Social Sciences ANTH, ECON, GEND, POLS, PSYC, or SOCI 6
Analytical Studies LING 101, MATH, PHIL 125, or STAT 3
Fine Arts AGAD, ARTE, CRWR, DESN, DRMA, MUSC, THAR, THPR, CLAS 252, CLAS 352, CLAS 353, or CLAS 356 3

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Program Element Description Credits
Primary Major The Arts major will range from 42 to 60 credits with a minimum 36 credits taken at the senior-level. 42-60
Secondary Major or Minor(s) Students have the option of completing a second major in an Arts or Science discipline, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level. 18-60
Options Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses. Up to 60
Total Degree Credits Including Breadth 120
 
 
 

Bachelor of Arts Honours 

Program Element Description Credits
Minimum Honour Requirements Honours requirements are determined by each discipline. 63
Option Courses, Non-Compulsory Honours Courses, and/or a Minor Students have the option of completing a minor from outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor. 57
Total Degree Credits 120

The minimum passing grade for a course at MacEwan University is a D unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. In the Faculty of Arts and Science, students typically require a minimum grade of C- to use a course as a prerequisite. Please check course descriptions for more information.

 
 

Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions 

Cross-Faculty course recognition represents an agreement between programs within MacEwan University and consists of a number of approved courses that have the potential to be recognized within another degree. These courses are not considered transfers or equivalents as the original course will show within a student's transcript and their Academic Planning and Progress Report (APPR). How the courses listed below might be used within a student’s degree are determined by the student’s program of study. They are dependent on a number of factors including year of declaration, year of completion, and individual program requirements.

Out-of-Faculty Course Course Recognition Course Used For
ACUP 117 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ACUP 209 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
ACUP 220, ACUP 303, and ACUP 304 (must complete all three) COSL 200 (6 credits) Options
ACUP 320 SCIOP 3XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
AGAD 300 COSL 300 Options
AGAD 435 WINL 300 Options
ARTE 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
ARTE 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 224 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 234 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 304 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 314 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 324 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
CORR 102 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 104 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 110 SOCI 225 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 120 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 214 COSL 200 Options
CORR 218 SOCI 321 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 224 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 100 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 108 and CYCW 112 SOCI 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 114 ARTOP 1XX Options
CYCW 115 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 201 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 204 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 205 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 206 ARTOP 2XX Options
CYCW 208 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 211 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 302 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 303 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 339 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 340 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 350 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 361 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 466 ARTOP 4XX Options
DESN 270 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
DESN 271 ARTOP2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ECCS 110 PSYC 1XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECCS 160 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 180 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 220 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECCS 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 270 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 310 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 355 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 425 SOCI 4XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 160 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECDV 220 COSL 200 Options
ECDV 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECDV 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 270 COSL 270 Options
ECDV 280 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
FNCE 301 ECON 3XX Options or Economics program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breath
HAPR 101 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HAPR 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
HAPR 114 WINL 200 Options
HAPR 201 ARTOP 2XX Options
HAPR 212 WINL 200 Options
HEED 110 ARTOP 1XX Options
HEED 120 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 104 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 105 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 124 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 128 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 150 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
HLST 290 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
INFM 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
INFM 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 209 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 260 COSL 200 Options
INTA 210 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
INTA 362 ARTOP 3XX Options
MTST 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 122 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 125 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 151, MTST 162, MTST 260, MTST 261, and MTST 262 COSL 200 Options
MUSC 104 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
MUSC 123 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
MUSC 124 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PEDS 100 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 101 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 103 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 109 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 200 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 203 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 206 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 207 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 209 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
PEDS 240 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PERL 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
PERL 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PERL 207 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 102 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 121 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PSSC 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 212 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 252 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 253 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 272 COSL 200 Options
PSSC 273 COSL 200 Options
SOWK 101 ARTOP 1XX Options, fulfills Humanities Breadth
SOWK 111 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
SOWK 204 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
TAST 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
TAST 129 and TAST 130 COSL 200 Options
THAR 240 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THAS 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 102 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
THAS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 203 COSL 200 Options
THAS 210 COSL 200 Options
THAS 211 COSL 200 Options
THAS 215 COSL 200 Options
THAS 222 ARTOP 2XX Options
THPR 205 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 206 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THPR 224 COSL 200 Options

History Requirements

History Major

History Minor

History Major 

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in History program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. In addition to the History Major, students will complete one of the following:

  • one minor,
  • two minors, or
  • a secondary Arts major

Students are required to complete option courses as well as the major(s) and minor(s). All BA degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), or options.

The History Major is 42 to 60 non-duplicative history credits with a minimum 36 credits at the senior-level. Students must complete a minimum of nine HIST credits at the 400-level.

Bachelor of Arts - History Major
Specific Major Requirements
HIST 100Introduction to History3
Choose 3 credits from each of the four areas:12
Canadian History Survey
History of Canada to 1867
History of Canada Since 1867
Pre-Modern Surveys
Survey of Greek and Roman History
Medieval Europe
Early Medieval Britain Before 1066
Early Modern European History
Early Modern Britain: The British Isles, 1400-1750
The Celtic Crescent before 1801
Modern Surveys
Modern Europe 1789 - Present
History of Modern Britain: Industry, Democracy, Empire, 1750-present
American History Since 1865
History of Modern Japan
Methodology
Making History: Theory and Methods in History
General Major Requirements
Choose 27 to 45 credits from junior-or senior-level HIST with a minimum of 9 HIST credits at the 400-level. Students can also use CLAS 210, CLAS 314, and/or CLAS 315 to fulfill the general major requirements.27-45
Secondary Major or Minor(s)
Students have the option of completing a second Arts major, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level.18-60
Options
Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses.0-60
Total Credits120

History Minor 

The History Minor requires 18 senior-level credits with a minimum of nine credits at the 300- or 400-level.

Minor Requirements
Choose 18 credits from senior-level HIST with a minimum of 9 credits at the 300- or 400-level. Students can also use CLAS 210, CLAS 314, and/or CLAS 315 to fulfill the minor requirements.18
Total Credits18

Degree Regulations

Students are strongly encouraged to seek advice from the academic advisors about academic planning for completing degree requirements at MacEwan University.

Academic Residency - Credit Requirements

In addition to the academic residency requirements of the University, upon admission to the Bachelor of Arts (BA), students also must complete at MacEwan University:

  • A minimum of 24 credits at the senior-level in the major discipline, with 12 of those senior credits completed at the 300- or 400-level. All 400-level requirements are to be completed at MacEwan University.
  • If applicable, a minimum of nine credits at the senior-level in a minor, with at least three of those credits at the 300- or 400- level.

Students with a previous MacEwan University credential are required to complete a minimum of 45 credits upon admission to the BA.

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from another post-secondary institution must complete a minimum of 60 additional MacEwan University credits applicable to the BA. Forty-five of these credits must be completed while the students is enrolled in the BA. This credit requirement applies to students who began their studies at MacEwan University and completed a credential at another institution.

Students who interrupt their program and who must apply for readmission to the program will be required to comply with any new regulations upon resumption of their studies.

Breadth Requirements

Courses taken to fulfil major, minor, or option requirements can also be used to satisfy breadth requirements.

Declaration of a Major and a Minor

Students are advised to declare a primary major and a minor, or a primary major and secondary major, or a primary major and two minors by the time they have completed 45 credits. Primary majors are selected from Arts disciplines and consist of 42 to 60 junior- and senior-level credits; secondary majors can be from an Arts or a Science discipline. Students cannot declare a multi-disciplinary science major (Mathematical or Physical Science majors). Except for those students in an Honours program, a maximum of 60 credits may be completed from any one discipline for credit towards the degree. A major and minor cannot be in the same discipline and students may not declare more than one out-of-faculty minor. Students can re-declare their major(s) and/or minor(s) if required.

For students completing multiple majors or minors, the Faculty cannot guarantee a schedule of classes that will permit the student to complete their degree in eight consecutive fall and winter semesters. Furthermore, depending on the configuration of the student's degree, meeting the requirements for the degree may require the completion of more than 120 credits for graduation. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Advising Office and a discipline advisor in their major and minor disciplines prior to declaration.

Restricted Enrolment Courses

The Faculty of Arts and Science strives to accommodate all students wishing to enrol in a given course when it is appropriate to their own program: however, classes in some courses must, for academic reasons, be restricted in size. If such a course is found to be oversubscribed, priority in registration will be given to those students whose programs may require it (e.g., majors, Honours, and/or minors) and then to other students as space permits.

Graduation Grade Point Average

As part of the Graduation Grade Point Average regulation above, Bachelor of Arts students must obtain an overall GGPA of 2.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the major(s) and a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the minor(s).

Graduation Requirements

Graduation requirements are governed by the date on which students declare their major(s) and minor(s). Students who declare their major(s) and minor(s) on or before the published deadline are bound by the requirements of the current academic year. Those students who declare after the published deadline are bound by the programs of study and degree requirements of the upcoming academic year as published in the MacEwan University Academic Calendar.

Junior- and Senior-Level Courses

Courses numbered from 100 to 199 are considered junior-level and courses numbered from 200 to 499 are considered senior-level.

Major or Minor 300- and 400-Level Requirements

The 300- and 400-level requirements in the major or minor cannot consist solely of project, field placement, and/or individual study courses.

Maximum Independent Courses

The maximum number of credits for independent work (project, field placement, and/or individual study courses), excluding the Honours Thesis, is 15 credits. Specific disciplines may have further restrictions.

Maximum Junior-Level Courses

A maximum of 48 credits at the 100-level are permitted in completion of the BA degree. Additional courses at the 100-level will be declared extra to the 120 credits required to complete the BA degree and will not be counted toward fulfilment of graduation requirements.

Minimum Arts Courses

Students are required to complete successfully a minimum of 72 credits from Arts courses.

Minimum Passing Grade

A minimum grade of D or credit (CR) is required for all Arts degree courses unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. 

Minimum Transfer Grade for Credit

A minimum grade of D is required on any transfer credit granted for the program. Unless otherwise stated, Arts and Science courses require a minimum grade of C- when the course is used as a prerequisite. Transfer credit decisions made by the university are final and cannot be appealed.

Out-of-Faculty Options Requirements

Students may take a maximum of 18 credits from courses offered by a MacEwan University Faculty or School other than Arts and Science. Students completing an out-of-Faculty minor or laddering students who have met the minor requirements with a MacEwan University diploma must complete their degree requirements from courses offered within the Faculty of Arts and Science or from the list of Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions in the Academic Calendar. Courses deemed as Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions are used to fulfill in-Faculty courses within the BA and do not count as out-of-Faculty options. Fine arts courses taken to fulfil breadth requirements count as in-Faculty credit.

Progression of Studies

Students are responsible for ensuring they meet the prerequisite and/or co-requisite requirements as noted on all courses that may fulfil Bachelor of Arts or Arts Honours program requirements.

Honours Regulations

Overall Requirements

The Honours program of study consists of 63 to 84 credits as determined by the discipline. Students in the Honours program may choose to complete a minor outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor.

Acceptance to Honours

For consideration of admittance/acceptance into Honours, students must present a minimum of 45 university-level credits applicable to the program of study, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. They must complete 24 of the 45 credits in the last 12 months; however, exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor. Individual departments may have additional requirements noted in their program of study.

Course Load

Students accepted into an Honours program must complete 24-credits in each twelve consecutive months they are in the program. Exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor.

Grade Point Average Requirement

Students accepted and enrolled in the Arts Honours program must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 across all courses in the degree. As well, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline for each twelve consecutive months following acceptance into the Honours program. Failure to do so will result in the student’s program status reverting to a BA with a major in the previous honours discipline.

Graduation Grade Point Average

In order to graduate, students must obtain an overall GGPA of 3.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline.

Program Learning Outcomes

Faculty of Arts and Science Degree-Level Learning Outcomes

Thinking about knowledge is at the core of University education and learning within the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students develop capacities to “think-through” - to practice wonder, reflection, and engage in thoughtful inquiry and dialogue. Thinking-through involves questioning beyond the confines of one's immediate personal, social, and disciplinary surroundings. First, knowledge is acquired and understood. Learning moves beyond acquiring information and data to a formally disciplined manner of thinking about knowledge. Next, knowledge is interrogated by asking and answering questions, distinguishing between opinion and knowledge, and developing tools to assess reasons and evidence. Finally, knowledge is synthesized as students develop coherent arguments, and link ideas together beyond what is immediately apparent. Learning is a lifelong creative process of discovery and action that happens beyond the classroom and the degree. Our graduates interact with and contribute to their community by integrating and applying the research and communication skills and ways of knowing developed through their education. Learning outcomes capture the observable knowledge, skills, and abilities graduates acquire that are the foundation of learning.

Graduates will demonstrate their ability to “think-through” by:

  1. Analysing puzzles, problems, concepts, and theories.
  2. Conceptualizing questions based on disciplinary knowledge.
  3. Evaluating knowledge within and across disciplines in ways that acknowledge historical, cultural, and social contexts.

Graduates will demonstrate research and scholarship skills by:

  1. Applying appropriate research skills and ethical principles.
  2. Interpreting results appreciating the value and limits of conclusions.
  3. Recognizing how research involves an ongoing process of reflection, dialogue, and reassessment.

Graduates will demonstrate diverse skills for communication by:

  1. Conveying complex ideas coherently in a variety of formats.
  2. Appraising information in ways that consider context and audience.
  3. Interpreting the ideas and arguments of others in ways that reflect their knowledge, judgement, and comprehension.

Graduates will demonstrate durable skills necessary for learning beyond their degree by:

  1. Collaborating with diverse groups.
  2. Examining different perspectives and challenging biases and preconceptions.
  3. Exploring the continuous impact and limitations of disciplinary knowledge and expertise.

History Major Program Learning Outcomes

Students of history become critical, adaptable, and independent thinkers capable of applying their knowledge of past societies to twenty-first-century challenges. While honing students’ abilities to read, research, reason, and write, history cultivates the flexible repertoire of cross-cultural competencies and problem-solving skills demanded by Alberta’s dynamic economy. A training in history is versatile. Our majors and minors learn to collect and evaluate data, weigh competing narratives, craft persuasive arguments, and communicate their findings in oral and written form. As a result, graduates have a preferred path of entry into careers in education, law, administration, politics, business, media, archives, and museums. 

At the completion of their program of study in history, students will demonstrate an ability to
 
1. Think critically and solve problems by:

  1. identifying biases, challenging assumptions, and distinguishing fact from opinion and misinformation when examining complex issues
  2. applying historical concepts and knowledge to mediate disputes and propose creative resolutions based on verifiable evidence and clear reasoning

2. Develop historical knowledge by:

  1. assembling a broad base of information about the individuals, institutions, ideas, and social practices that have shaped human societies across time
  2. examining the interconnected development of the state; the major world religions; science and technology; military tactics and diplomacy; capitalism; imperialism, colonialism, and decolonization; and attitudes about gender, ethnicity, and family life

3. Apply historical knowledge about major developments and themes in world history by:

  1. comparing how humans have navigated shifting social, political, technological, and economic forces across time and place, and assessing the impact of a society’s successes and failures on individuals and communities
  2. considering and critiquing diverse perspectives within and between cultures
  3. weighing the interplay between individual agency, ideology, socio-economic structures, and contingency in accounting for historical causation and change
  4. developing both scholarly empathy (by evaluating decisions and consequences in their historical context) and self-awareness (by reflecting on contemporary parallels)

4. Employ disciplinary skills by:

  1. mastering the technical requirements of historical writing by using citations properly
  2. closely reading, counterposing, contextualizing and then interpreting a range of primary sources (texts, images, and/or artefacts)
  3. summarizing and critiquing the historiography of a given topic, and understanding the practice of history as an evolving conversation that responds to new questions, evidence, and methodologies
  4. defining a historically significant research question and compiling a comprehensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources using libraries, archives, interviews, and/or databases
  5. evaluating and synthesizing varied, incomplete, and sometimes contradictory evidence, and then formulating a nuanced thesis in a well-organized essay that engages with existing scholarship

5. Hone effective communication skills by:

  1. participating actively in class discussions based on extensive preparatory readings and note-taking
  2. working productively with group members to accomplish a collaborative task
  3. writing in a polished and coherent manner for a range of purposes and audiences (literature or film reviews, source analyses, digital timelines, policy memos, analytical essays, research proposals, etc.)
  4. presenting research findings in oral and/or written form, fielding follow-up questions, and incorporating feedback as part of the revision process

6. Practice responsible citizenship by acquiring historical knowledge relating to:

  1. Canada’s First Nations and their relationship with the state and Canadian society
  2. the constitutional, political, and economic development of Canada
  3. the foundations and development of Canada’s pluralist society in terms of French-English relations, sectarian conflict, immigration, race, and gender relations
  4. the formation and interplay of regional, provincial, national, and global identities

7. Demonstrate cross-cultural fluency and social awareness by:

  1. identifying the historical forces (political, cultural, social, religious, environmental, and/or economic) that have shaped contemporary public issues
  2. recognizing the historic and ongoing contributions, perspectives, or identities of diverse groups

Student Plan

  • The student plan provides a suggested course sequence with the minimum number of credits required for the major
  • The suggested course sequence depends on course availability, the student's schedule, and the student's choice of minor(s) or secondary major
  • It is highly recommended that students complete their Breadth Requirements by the end of year 2
  • Students can also use CLAS 210, CLAS 314, or CLAS 315 to fulfill general major requirements
Year 1Credits
HIST 1003
ENGL 1023
Breadth Requirements24
 30
Year 2Credits
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from each of the following three areas:9
Canadian History Survey
Pre-Modern Surveys
Modern Surveys
Breadth, Option, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements21
 30
Year 3Credits
HIST 3003
Choose 12 credits (4 courses) from senior-level HIST12
Options, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements15
 30
Year 4Credits
Choose 9 credits (3 courses) from 400-level HIST9
Choose 6 credits (2 courses) from senior-level HIST6
Options, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements15
 30
Total Credits 120

Expected Course Offerings

Following is a list of expected course offerings for fall 2024 and winter 2025. We will update the list with expected courses scheduled for fall 2025 and winter 2026 in February 2024. While some might change, students can be assured that required courses will be available.

Fall 2024
Introduction to History
Foundations of the Modern World before c.1500 C.E.
Foundations of the Modern World from 1500 C.E. to the Present
Early Modern European History
Modern Europe 1789 - Present
Early Modern Britain: The British Isles, 1400-1750
History of Modern Britain: Industry, Democracy, Empire, 1750-present
Modern France
History of Canada to 1867
History of Canada Since 1867
Making History: Theory and Methods in History
Topics in World History
History of Christianity
Scotland from MacBeth to the Union (1707)
The Canadian West
Public History
Topics in Imperialism and Colonialism
Topics in Canadian History
Topics in the History of Religion
Winter 2025
Introduction to History
Foundations of the Modern World before c.1500 C.E.
Foundations of the Modern World from 1500 C.E. to the Present
Early Modern European History
Modern Europe 1789 - Present
American History Since 1865
History of Canada to 1867
History of Canada Since 1867
History of Modern Japan
Women's History
Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation
British Society, Politics, and Culture, 1450-1750
Enlightenment and Revolution in France
Britain as a World Power
Canadian Political History
Topics in European History
Topics in Medieval and Early Modern British History
Topics in Social History
Field Placement
 

Admission Requirements

Applicants may be admitted to one of the following:

Regular Admission 

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must have a minimum overall average of 65 percent, with no course grade lower than 50 percent, in the following high school courses:

  1. ELA 30-1
  2. Four subjects from Group A, B, C, or D

Notes:

  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to present a broad range of subjects in order to benefit from the breadth of learning and to increase flexibility of future program and course choices.
  • A maximum of two Group B subjects may be presented; they must be from different disciplines.
  • A maximum of one Group D subject may be presented. Group D subjects used for admission must be 5-credit or any credit combination of at least 5 credits (e.g., two 3-credit subjects).
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Economics.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 31 is required for Economics Honours.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Psychology.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Mature Admission

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must be Canadian Applicants, 20 years of age or older, and have been out of full-time high school at least one year by the beginning of the intake term. Applicants must have the following:

  • ELA 30-1 with a minimum grade of 65 percent (or equivalent)

OR

  • Three credits of university-level English, including ENGL 111 from MacEwan University, with a minimum grade of C.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Previous Post-Secondary Work

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Admission in this category does not imply or guarantee the transfer of any coursework and/or credential unless a block transfer agreement (internal or external) is in effect and published in the calendar by the Office of the University Registrar. In addition, transfer of coursework does not imply or guarantee that an applicant will be admitted.

Applicants must have successfully completed the following from a recognized institution:

  • A minimum of 24 university-level credits with a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Additional Admission Criteria

All applicants must meet the following:

1. English Language Proficiency

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

All applicants must meet an acceptable level of English language proficiency. We will require official documents such as high school or post-secondary transcripts or proof of successful completion of standardized language evaluation. Full details are available in MacEwan University’s academic calendar or online at MacEwan.ca/ELP.

2. Other Admission Criteria

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

Applicants who have been assigned two unsatisfactory academic records within the past five years will not be considered for admission or re-admission to the program until a minimum three years from the date of the assignment of the last unsatisfactory academic record. For the purpose of admission or re-admission, an unsatisfactory record is defined as a transcript with the notation ‘required to withdraw’ or equivalent.

History Courses

HIST 100
Introduction to History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the practice of history and the methods by which historians research and think about the past using selected topics in world history as a foundation for study. In learning about each topic, students are encouraged, through practical exercises and assessment strategies, to think historically and to acquire the essential research skills that underpin history as a discipline. Students consider the quality and authenticity of sources, the nature of historical causation, and the role of the historian in the evaluation and interpretation of evidence. Overall, this course is designed to hone students' critical faculties, interpretive skills, and writing abilities while stimulating their intellectual curiosity about the past.

HIST 101
Foundations of the Modern World before c.1500 C.E.
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to what historians call the ‘modern’ world in the period between c.500 and 1500 C.E. The underlying theme of the course is that this period has seen an increasing interconnectedness between human societies, leading to the globalised world in which we live. Students study topics such as trade patterns, intellectual exchange, religious movements, health, wellness and the environment, state and empire building, war, conquest and diplomacy, and the spread of disease, goods and ideas. They learn to understand the processes that increased global interaction, both voluntary and forced, and spawned conflicts, both economic and political.

HIST 102
Foundations of the Modern World from 1500 C.E. to the Present
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to what historians call the ‘modern’ world in the period from the sixteenth century to the present. The underlying theme of the course is that this period has seen an increasing interconnectedness between human societies, leading to the globalised world in which we live. Students study topics such as trade patterns, colonialism, imperial expansion and contraction, religious, artistic and intellectual change, the immense socio-economic transformation springing from industrialisation, and modern ideologies like liberalism, socialism, nationalism and racism. They learn to understand the processes that increased global interaction, both voluntary and forced, and spawned conflicts, both economic and political.

HIST 204
Judaism, Christianity, Islam
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the intertwined histories of three major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. These three traditions share several core assumptions about the identity of God and the relationship between divinity and humanity. At the same time, they have also developed in unique ways over the millennia, so that each tradition both differs from the others and contains rich diversity within itself. By focusing on cultural, intellectual, and political exchange across these traditions, this course prepares students to understand how such exchange continues to shape our world today.

HIST 205
Medieval Europe
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the student to the important events, developments and themes in medieval European history from Charlemagne to the Black Death. Discussion of social and political topics such as feudalism and manorialism, growth of legal systems, political theory and the rise of medieval states, the Crusades, medieval warfare, and the Holy Roman Empire are connected to cultural and intellectual themes related to Muslims in Iberia, urbanization, reform of the Catholic Church, and the rise of universities.

HIST 206
Early Medieval Britain Before 1066
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the development of the distinct regions of the British Isles and Ireland before the eleventh century. Focusing on a period rich in mythology surrounding larger than life characters such as Boudica, King Arthur, St. Patrick, Offa of Mercia, Alfred the Great, Ivar the Boneless, and MacBeth and his wife, Gruoch, this course explores the historical context behind these figures by examining the political development of the British Isles and the foundation of the relationships forged between England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

HIST 207
Medieval Britain: The British Isles, 1066-1450
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a history of the British Isles starting in the long twelfth century and culminating in the middle of the fifteenth century. This period in British history witnessed considerable social, political, cultural, and economic change punctuated by major epidemics, rebellions, and wars, as well as significant literary, artistic, and technological innovations. Students will explore these major events by examining the contexts in which they occurred and the impact they had on internal and domestic relations across the British Isles.

HIST 209
Early Modern European History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of European history from the Renaissance to Napoleon. Often seen as one of the most dynamic periods in European history, early modern Europe experienced rapid social, cultural, political and economic change that created new opportunities and challenges for every level of European society. In this course, students consider the evolving economy and society, the basic facts of life for the majority of Europe’s peoples. They learn how the religious and intellectual unity of western culture fragmented and dissolved under the impact of new ideas and examine the nature of politics, the rise and fall of empires and the emergence of nation states.

HIST 210
Modern Europe 1789 - Present
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of European history from the French Revolution to the present. It considers both how modern Europe’s dramatic ascension impacted the wider world and how colonial developments reverberated on the continent. The course starts with the twin upheavals of the French and Industrial Revolutions; charts their political and socio-economic fallout in the form of new ideologies, nation-states, social classes and technologies; and shows how nationalist rivalries and a new form of racism fueled a scramble for colonies across the globe. It then analyses Europe’s self-destruction in two world wars and the Holocaust; the decolonization process; and the emergence of a continent divided by the Cold War until the collapse of the Soviet Union. It concludes with a discussion of the European Union’s future. Instructors may incorporate a diverse selection of sources—paintings, political pamphlets, memoirs, poetry, novels, music, and/or film—to highlight how the religious, national, class, racial and gender boundaries of modern Europe have changed over time.

HIST 211
Early Modern Britain: The British Isles, 1400-1750
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the student to a period in the history of the British Isles characterized by dynamic political, social, economic and cultural change. Between 1400 and 1750, England, Scotland, and to a lesser extent Wales and Ireland, underwent religious reform, witnessed the birth of the nation-state, saw their economic capacities expanded, and began to engage in colonial imperial activities. This course explores one of the most transformative periods in 'British' history.

HIST 212
History of Modern Britain: Industry, Democracy, Empire, 1750-present
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Britain was a central actor in the social, economic, political, military, and cultural transformations of the modern world. By the nineteenth century, it projected unparalleled economic and political might. Following a brief review of the social, political and cultural inheritance of previous centuries, this course examines the path to democratic politics and liberal modernity; the social and economic transformations of the industrial revolution; the politics of class consciousness; and the electoral and social reforms of the Victorian era. With a global lens, the course traces the emergence of Britain as an Atlantic and global power; considers the impact of British imperial might on the rest of the world; and assesses the extent to which colonial encounters impacted British domestic society. Moving to the twentieth century, the course examines the impact of the world wars; the transition from a warfare to welfare state; the politics of decolonization and decline; European integration; and the causes and consequences of Brexit.

HIST 214
The Celtic Crescent before 1801
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the development of the Celtic regions of the British Isles and Ireland prior to the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. Some historians have argued that it is in this period that the modern sense of Celtic identity has its roots. Important to this development is the fact that Ireland, Wales, and Scotland are often subsumed under the title “Celtic” and shared a common experience through their interactions with the English. Yet, most scholarship and popular culture portray the Celtic regions of Britain in an undifferentiated manner. This course explores the unique histories of the Celtic regions of the British Isles as well as their shared cultural links and experiences within the region. Topics may include: Roman Britain, King Arthur, the Celtic Church, Picts and Dalriada, the Vikings, Strong Bow in Ireland, Manx Kingship, Owain Glyndwr, Kin Networks, Celtic Identity, Art and Language, Plantation and Colonialism, Resistance, and Incorporation.

HIST 215
Modern France
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course situates developments in French literature, philosophy and art in the context of the nation’s tumultuous political history from the eighteenth century to the present day. It traces changing conceptions of class, nationality, gender, selfhood and aesthetics through the momentous cultural and political ruptures that have characterized life in France and its colonies since the great revolution of 1789.

HIST 250
American History to 1865
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of American history to the Civil War. Beginning with the early colonial ventures in Virginia and New England, the course traces the development and expansion of the American federation through the War of Independence, the Mexican-American war, and the Civil War. The American political experiment with constitutional democracy and the development of the party system are examined. The course also identifies and examines important social issues including the treatment of Aboriginal people, slavery and the rights of women.

HIST 251
American History Since 1865
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of American history since the Civil War.  Beginning with Reconstruction, this course traces the social, political, and economic transformation of America as it developed into a global superpower.  The industrial and consumer-based society forms the backdrop for the political, social, and geo-political changes: from populism and progressivism to the Reagan revolution, xenophobia to civil rights, isolationism to the Iraq War.

HIST 260
History of Canada to 1867
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys Canadian history before 1867. Attention is given to both the French and English empires, the conflicts that occurred, and the social and political development of the colonies. Special consideration is given to the interactions between these imperial and colonial societies and Aboriginal people. The expansion of the European empires to the Pacific coast is also covered. The course concludes with the Confederation process in British North America.

HIST 261
History of Canada Since 1867
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys Canadian history since 1867. It examines the people, forces and events that have shaped the history of this country, its society, its institutions and its identity. This course provides not only a foundation for further study in Canadian history but also the knowledge necessary for effective citizenship.

HIST 281
Asia Since A.D. 1500
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a survey of Asian history since 1500. The focus is on East Asia, including China and Japan, with complementary sections on Southeastern and Southern Asia. The emphasis is on the socio-cultural, economic, and political history of the region as well as relations with other countries and empires in the global community.

HIST 282
History of Modern Japan
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course presents a survey of modern Japanese history beginning with the Meiji Restoration in 1868. Focusing on the major political, social, economic, military, and diplomatic themes, Japan's evolution as a modern state will be examined. Major topics may include the birth of liberal democracy, imperialism and empire, militarism, the Pacific War, and Japan's postwar rise as an economic superpower.

HIST 291
Topics in Political and International History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course surveys political and international world history with a focus on a particular conceptual topic. The topics are broad-based themes which have political or international consequences; the time period of study may vary from the late middle ages to the present. Examples of topics that might be covered are warfare, state formation and nation-building, the exercise of imperialism both formal and informal, global trade, or the development of political ideologies like liberalism, nationalism and socialism.

HIST 292
Women's History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the diverse experiences of women in the past, using an array of sources to contextualize their aspirations, struggles, and accomplishments. Lectures, readings, and discussions are designed to introduce the field’s key concepts and debates while focusing on a particular period and region selected by the instructor. The course highlights female agency in the face of various structural obstacles and cultural forces, while exploring how sex and gender intersect with other categories such as age, class, race, nationality, sexuality, and religion to shape women’s identities and day-to-day lives.

HIST 294
History of Science and Technology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys important themes, traditions, people and institutions of Western science, technology and medicine. It familiarizes students with an important aspect of European/Western culture and serves as an introduction to the history of science and technology. This course emphasizes how individuals and societies have understood and explained the natural world and their place in it, and how they have approached and justified the investigation of that world.

HIST 300
Making History: Theory and Methods in History
3 Credits          Weekly (2-0-1)

History is an academic discipline whose practitioners make a systematic study of the complexity, variety, and change of human ideas, behaviours, and actions across time. Historians gather, assess, analyze, and organize information to create knowledge about the past. This course examines the process of making history. It includes discussions about both the nature of historical evidence and the methods historians use. It also introduces students to basic questions and issues concerning the nature of our knowledge of the past.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 100 or 6 credits of senior HIST.

HIST 301
Topics in World History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course examines world history through the in-depth study of a particular topic selected by the instructor. Examples of topics include, but are not limited to, the environment, international conflicts, the status of women, slavery, childhood, revolution, or pandemics. Students can take this course up to three times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 304
History of Christianity
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

In this course, students explore the rich diversity of Christian perspectives that predominated from antiquity through the early modern period. Students work through seminal texts in the history of Christian thought and practice. By exploring more than just the works that were later declared orthodox, students learn about the many alternative Christianities that flourished in the past, ranging from the Gnostics of ancient Egypt to radical reformers leading peasant revolts in early modern Europe. Listening to these alternative voices, while also placing Christian history into intimate conversation with Judaism and Islam, allows students to engage with Christianity not as a closed book, but as an open conversation across the centuries.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in 3 credits of 200-level HIST courses.

HIST 306
Urban Europe: City and Society, 1450-1850
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course explores the European “City” as a major site for social, cultural, economic and political exchange and a site wherein urban actors identified with the multiple communities that formed within city limits. Central to the discussion of the European City is the impact that the national and international flow of ideas, culture, people, goods and capital had on urban centres across Europe over time. Topics include urban sights, sounds, and smells; street-corners and squares; community; built environments; gender and agency; occupation and social status; marginalization; demographic change; and urbanization.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 308
Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course explores some of the major themes in the history of Europe from the late fourteenth to the early seventeenth century. Its focus is on cultural, intellectual, and religious history, including the rise of humanism, developments in education, arts and literature, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and philosophical and scientific innovations. This exploration of key moments in European history is set within the appropriate political and social contexts of these developments, including the emergence of the nation state, the rise of printing, significant demographic change, and the beginnings of European overseas empires.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of HIST 100, 101, 205, 209.

HIST 309
Crime and Society in Early Modern Europe
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course investigates some of the major themes in the social history of Early Modern Europe from the onset of the Black Death to the Enlightenment. Students focus on the shifts in social, political, economic, and cultural attitudes that ushered in new ideas on crime and regulation, poverty and social discipline. Lecture topics and assigned reading materials describe how these ideas affected the peoples of Western Europe and contributed to a variety of ways individuals and groups experienced inclusion and exclusion in their communities.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C-in any 200-level HIST course.

HIST 311
British Society, Politics, and Culture, 1450-1750
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course examines the social history of Britain: the lives of its people, both grand and humble. We explore families, courtship and marriage, work and play, gender roles, religion and superstition, crime and punishment, class relations, local and regional identities, poverty and poor relief. Specific topics vary depending on the individual instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 312
Scotland from MacBeth to the Union (1707)
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course investigates the important events, developments, and themes in Scottish history before Scotland united with England in 1707 to form Great Britain. The course explores Scotland's unique blend of Gaelic, English, and Norman traditions in the Middle Ages, its 'pure and trew' Reformation in the sixteenth century, and its attempt to stand independent in the face of English imperialism. The course emphasizes Scotland's political and social developments in the period while providing significant coverage to intellectual, religious, economic, and cultural themes.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of HIST 100, HIST 205, HIST 209, HIST 211, or HIST 214.

HIST 315
Enlightenment and Revolution in France
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the intersection of ideas, institutions and events in France during the revolutionary era. Students are introduced to the art, literature, and philosophy of the French Enlightenment in the context of its key institutions, cultural venues, and figures. After identifying and analyzing the movement’s main currents and critics, students link Enlightenment critiques of absolutism and Old Regime society to both the outbreak of France’s great revolution in 1789 and its descent into Terror. The course concludes by analyzing the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte and the birth of modern nationalism and total war.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in 3 credits of 200-level HIST courses.

HIST 338
Britain as a World Power
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Britain held a position of world dominance from the eighteenth century until the world wars of the twentieth century. It acquired a worldwide empire, sometimes deliberately, but often haphazardly. Britain administered its empire in a variety of ways, sometimes indirectly through local rulers, sometimes quite directly. In this course, students examine Britain's rise as an imperial nation and its relations with other European nations, as well as the process of its decline both as an imperial and a European power.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 340
Diplomacy, War, and Conflict in the 20th Century
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course investigates the origins and consequences of the major military conflicts of the twentieth century. It covers the Great War, the Second World War and the Cold War, as well as the national wars of independence in Asia and Africa, the war for Jammu and Kashmir, the Arab-Israeli conflicts of the Middle East, the Vietnam War and the Gulf War.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 341
Fascism in Europe 1918-1945
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course investigates the phenomenon of fascism in inter-war Europe. The course starts from the premise that a generic fascism did exist, and can be defined, and that its origins and ideological components are traceable, not only to the general crisis following the First World War, but to social and political trends going back into the nineteenth century. The course also explicitly compares fascist movements, and the two fascist dictatorships of Italy and Germany, with the authoritarian regimes which become so prevalent in this period, highlighting both the essential differences between the two phenomena, and also the way in which authoritarianism occasionally borrowed fascist language and imagery. Specific attention is paid to Italian Fascism and German National Socialism, and to the native fascist movements of Eastern Europe.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in HIST 102 or HIST 112 or HIST 210 or HIST 340.

HIST 342
The Atlantic World
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Contact among Africans, Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the Americas created an Atlantic World.  The Atlantic Ocean linked the nations and peoples living around its edges, beginning in the 15th century and continuing until the wars of independence and the end of the slave trade in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.  Slaves and slave-traders, soldiers, merchants, sailors, pirates, indentured servants, convicts, settlers, governors and administrators crossed the ocean to encounter a diverse array of New World peoples.  This course examines the lives of these people and the encounters, relationships, exchanges and clashes among these people in their Atlantic context.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 343
Genocide in the Modern World
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course evaluates the motives and circumstances of genocide in world history and uncovers the experiences of its victims. Students examine competing definitions of genocide and explanations for why it has occurred and how it has changed over the course of the past century. Further, they consider what genocide reveals about the logic of modern politics, racism and warfare. The course challenges students to pursue a comparative analysis of a range of case studies, and exposes them to a variety of sources, from memoirs and film to theoretical work, academic articles, and monographs.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 345
Nationalism
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course examines nationalism as a theme in world history. It starts with an exploration of nationalism as a concept: its history, its terminology and some of the theories cited for its emergence. This course examines the scholarly debate as to how far back we can go in identifying nations, the connection between nationalism and literacy, and that between nationalism and socio-economic development. Relying largely on a consideration of nationalism in a European context, the course nevertheless considers extra-European manifestations, including Canadian, American, Indian and Japanese nationalism; it also considers the peculiar phenomenon of "state nationalism", as attempted in the Russian and Ottoman Empires, and what might be called "confessional nationalism", as typified by modern Islamism.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100-level HIST course.

HIST 352
The U.S. in World Affairs
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the history of American foreign policy during the 20th century providing insight into the process of foreign policy decision making, as well as the ramifications U.S. foreign policy has on nations around the world. Major topics include expansionism, "Big Stick" diplomacy, Wilsonianism, entry into wars, relations with Latin America and the Middle East, as well as the origins, culture, and effect of the events of the Cold War.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100 or 200 level HIST course.

HIST 361
Canadian Political History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the political history of Canada since Confederation. Although the federal political system is the central focus of the course, provincial political developments of national importance are not ignored. Among the topics discussed in this course are the Pacific scandal, the Manitoba school question, women’s suffrage, the Progressive party and the Maritime Rights movement, the politics of unemployment the rise of Social Credit in Alberta, the formation of the CCF and NDP, Medicare, the Quiet Revolution, the Constitution Debates, and the Meech Lake Accord.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100 level or 200 level HIST course.

HIST 362
History of Alberta
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Alberta occupies a distinct space in the Canadian federation. Created by an act of the federal government in 1905, the province was originally settled by immigrants from Europe who sought opportunities in agriculture and mining. The rural province was transformed by the depression and the discovery of oil and gas. Today it is an urban province that attracts immigrants from around the globe. It also has a distinct political culture. The province has been governed by a series of political dynasties from the Liberals to UFA to Social Credit to the Conservatives. Each of these political dynasties had a tendentious relationship with the federal government and the province's electors have consistently supported political parties that emphasized a decentralized federal regime. This course examines these changes in economic, social, and political conditions to help us better understand Alberta today.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200- level HIST course.

HIST 364
Topics in Western Canadian History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate-level course examines a selected topic in western Canadian history in depth. The topic in any given year is determined by the instructor. Examples of topics include, but are not limited to, broad-based themes like fur trade colonialism, prairie populism, gender and settlement, nativism and racism, and western Canadian alienation or more focused topics such as the making of treaties with the Indigenous people, the colonization of Vancouver Island, the Métis and the Red River settlement, or the history of the oil and gas industry. Students can complete this course up to two times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200- level HIST.

HIST 366
The Canadian West
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the history of the Canadian West. Social, political and economic developments in this region continue to play a central role in Canada's development. Topics include the experiences of Indigenous people, the region's leadership in social policy related to immigration, women's suffrage and Medicare; the resource-based economy of furs, wheat, timber, mining and oil; and the distinctive political culture and alternative political parties that have emerged in the Canadian West including the Progressives, CCF, Social Credit, and Reform.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level history course.

HIST 367
Canada in World Affairs
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines Canada's diplomatic, military, economic and political role in world affairs. Canada's relationship with the British Empire and the United States receives special emphasis. Attention is also given to the affect of international affairs on domestic social and political issues.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course.

HIST 369
First Nations and Canada
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This intermediate level course examines Canada’s relationship with First Nations from the 1830s to the present. The focus is on the interplay between the aspirations of First Nations, Aboriginal rights, constitutional law, economic and social changes, and the development of government policy. Special attention is paid to the consequences of the policy development for Aboriginal societies and culture.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in HIST 260 or HIST 261.

HIST 395
Oral History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Predating the written word, oral history is among the oldest forms of historical inquiry, and the ability to gather, preserve, and interpret the voices and memories of the past is currently undergoing a renaissance thanks to digital technology. This course introduces students to the best practices of oral history, provides a foundational understanding of the theory about memory, narrative, and researcher-narrator relationships, and allows students to actively participate in recording stories of the past. Students from other disciplines are welcome to enroll in this course, but will need to get permission of the department.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in any 100- or 200-level HIST course, or permission of the department.

HIST 397
Public History
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Public history is a branch of historical work that involves presenting history to the public or working with the public to conduct research and interpret the past. This course introduces students to some of the theories about public history and some of the issues in the field, including ideas about memory and representation, heritage and history, and preservation and interpretation. It examines common sources for public history, including material culture, archives, and oral interviews. It also explores some of the opportunities available in the field of public history.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any 100 or 200 level HIST course.

HIST 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

HIST 400
Senior Thesis
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

In this individual study course, students write a major essay and make a conference-style presentation on a specific topic of their choice. This course is open only to History Majors. Students desiring HIST 400 must consult with the History Coordinator to select a primary and secondary supervisor. Note: Students may receive credit for only one of HIST 400 and HIST 401.

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

HIST 410
Topics in European History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticise and analyse readings on a selected topic in European history. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to one or more of the seminar topics. Students can take this course up to three times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST, including one of HIST 205, HIST 209, or HIST 210.

HIST 411
Topics in Medieval and Early Modern British History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticize and analyze readings on a selected topic in medieval and early modern British history. They also prepare a major research paper on a subject related to the course topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST, including at least 3 credits from HIST 206, HIST 211, or HIST 311.

HIST 442
Topics in Imperialism and Colonialism
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar-based course, students discuss, criticise and analyse readings on a selected topic related to imperialism and/or colonialism. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to one or more of the seminar topics. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 460
Topics in Canadian History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique and analyse readings on a selected topic in Canadian history. They also prepare a major research paper related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses including either HIST 260 or HIST 261.

HIST 476
Topics in the History of Religion
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique, and analyse readings on a selected topic in the history of premodern religion. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor, but is typically drawn from the traditions of Judaism, Christianity, or Islam.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST, including at least 3 credits from HIST 204, HIST 205, HIST 304, or HIST 308.

HIST 490
Topics in Social History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique, and analyse readings on a selected topic in Social History. They also prepare a major research paper on an issue related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given year is selected by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300-level HIST courses.

HIST 491
Topics in International History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

In this seminar, students discuss, critique and analyse readings on a selected topic related to international history. They also prepare a major research paper related to the seminar topic. The topic in any given section is selected by the instructor. Students can take this course up to three times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 9 credits of 200- or 300 level HIST courses.

HIST 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits senior-level students to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise his or her project. This course can be taken twice for credit.

HIST 499
Field Placement
3 Credits          Total (45-0-90)

In this course, students are assigned to public history, community, and/or heritage organizations where they apply their knowledge and skills in supervised projects.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in either HIST 300 or HIST 397 and consent of the department.