Academic Calendar

Political Science - Bachelor of Arts

Overview

You are passionate about engaging with the complex and contested issues that societies and governments face, and you understand the important role politics plays in creating and resolving them. In this discipline, you will gain insight into the political process and how political systems work. You will take part in debates, discussions, and team-oriented academic activities and have the opportunity to strengthen your skills outside the classroom by participating in MacEwan University’s award-winning Model United Nations club. The program will sharpen your critical thinking, research, and communication skills to prepare you for careers in law, diplomacy, public policy, non-governmental sector management, journalism, and more. At the end of the program, you will have the knowledge and skill sets to think critically, but not cynically, about how competing interests are reconciled and collective decisions are made in Canada and around the world.

Contact Information

Department of Anthropology, Economics, and Political Science
Room 7-368, City Centre Campus
10700 - 104 Avenue
Edmonton, AB T5J 4S2
T: 780-633-3890

Arts and Science Academic Advising
Room 6-211, City Centre Campus
T: 780-497-4505
E: artsandscience@macewan.ca

The Bachelor of Arts

Faculty of Arts and Science
MacEwan.ca/BA

MacEwan University’s Bachelor of Arts (BA) provides a liberal arts education that allows students to explore a variety of academic disciplines and acquire a broad knowledge base that will prepare them for employment or future post-secondary studies. The degree provides students with breadth, depth, and diversity in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, analytical studies, and fine arts, as well as courses focused on language and literature. BA students study subjects in major and/or minor disciplines and must be familiar with the academic and Faculty regulations and procedures published herein.

General Program Information

The BA program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. The degree emphasizes breadth and depth and has been designed for exceptional flexibility and customization. Students can complete a major and a minor, a double major, or a major and two minors. Students can choose a secondary major in an Arts or Science discipline, but the primary major must be in an Arts discipline.

All newly admitted students enter the BA program as “Undeclared.”  Undeclared means a student has not yet chosen their major(s) and minor(s). Students may declare at any time after being accepted to the BA, and typically, they declare after completing a minimum of 45 credits. The declaration period for noncompetitive majors and minors is between September 1 and February 15 and between September 1 and January 15 for competitive majors and minors. The Arts and Science Academic Advising Office will send information about majors and minors via email and newsletters; please contact the Advising Office if you require further assistance with this decision.

Arts Disciplines

Discipline Major Minor Honours
Anthropology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Classics - ⦿ -
Creative Writing - ⦿ -
Economics ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
English ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Film Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
French - ⦿ -
Gender Studies - ⦿ -
History ⦿ ⦿ -
Philosophy ⦿ ⦿ -
Political Science ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Psychology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Sociology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Spanish - ⦿ -

Science Disciplines 

Discipline Major Minor
Applied Statistics ⦿
Biological Sciences ⦿ ⦿
Chemistry ⦿ ⦿
Computer Science ⦿ ⦿
Earth and Planetary Sciences ⦿
Environmental Sciences ⦿
Mathematics ⦿ ⦿
Physics ⦿
Planetary Physics ⦿
Statistics ⦿

Out of Faculty Minors

Discipline Minor
Accounting Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Arts and Cultural Management ⦿
Business Law ⦿
Business Studies ⦿
Digital Experience Design ⦿
Finance Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Human Resources Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Marketing Minor for Arts and Science ⦿

Laddering a Diploma into the Bachelor of Arts

Students with an accredited diploma can ladder into the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and use some of their diploma coursework towards their degree requirements. If you have questions about the diploma laddering, please visit www.macewan.ca/bastudent or contact artsandscience@macewan.ca.

Preparing for Professional Studies

Students intending to enter professional programs at other universities, such as law and education, can take their pre-professional studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at MacEwan University. For example, a selection of courses facilitates the transition to an after-degree education program or, if the student prefers, transfer to a Bachelor of Education program after completing as many as 60 credits of coursework. Students are advised to consult the admissions requirements for the universities and programs of their choice and to select their MacEwan University courses accordingly. Completing pre-professional courses at MacEwan University does not guarantee admission to the subsequent professional program. Each professional program requires a separate application, and entry is competitive, not automatic.

Degree Requirements

Breadth Requirements

 All Bachelor of Arts degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), Honours, or options. 

Breadth Element Description Credits
Literacy ENGL 102 and 3 credits in university English (not including ENGL 111, ENGL 108, or ENGL 211), and 6 credits in a single language other than English or 6 credits in world literature (COMP 102 and COMP 103) 12
Humanities CLAS, HIST, HUMN, or PHIL 6
Sciences ASTR, BICM, BIOL, BOTN, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, GENE, PHYS, PSYC, SCIE, or ZOOL 6
Social Sciences ANTH, ECON, GEND, POLS, PSYC, or SOCI 6
Analytical Studies LING 101, MATH, PHIL 125, or STAT 3
Fine Arts AGAD, ARTE, CRWR, DESN, DRMA, MUSC, THAR, THPR, CLAS 252, CLAS 352, CLAS 353, or CLAS 356 3

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Program Element Description Credits
Primary Major The Arts major will range from 42 to 60 credits with a minimum 36 credits taken at the senior-level. 42-60
Secondary Major or Minor(s) Students have the option of completing a second major in an Arts or Science discipline, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level. 18-60
Options Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses. Up to 60
Total Degree Credits Including Breadth 120
 
 
 

Bachelor of Arts Honours 

Program Element Description Credits
Minimum Honour Requirements Honours requirements are determined by each discipline. 63
Option Courses, Non-Compulsory Honours Courses, and/or a Minor Students have the option of completing a minor from outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor. 57
Total Degree Credits 120

The minimum passing grade for a course at MacEwan University is a D unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. In the Faculty of Arts and Science, students typically require a minimum grade of C- to use a course as a prerequisite. Please check course descriptions for more information.

Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions 

Cross-Faculty course recognition represents an agreement between programs within MacEwan University and consists of a number of approved courses that have the potential to be recognized within another degree. These courses are not considered transfers or equivalents as the original course will show within a student's transcript and their Academic Planning and Progress Report (APPR). How the courses listed below might be used within a student’s degree are determined by the student’s program of study. They are dependent on a number of factors including year of declaration, year of completion, and individual program requirements.

Out-of-Faculty Course Course Recognition Course Used For
ACUP 117 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ACUP 209 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
ACUP 220, ACUP 303, and ACUP 304 (must complete all three) COSL 200 (6 credits) Options
ACUP 320 SCIOP 3XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
AGAD 300 COSL 300 Options
AGAD 435 WINL 300 Options
ARTE 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
ARTE 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 224 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 234 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 304 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 314 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 324 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
CORR 102 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 104 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 110 SOCI 225 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 120 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 214 COSL 200 Options
CORR 218 SOCI 321 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 224 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 100 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 108 and CYCW 112 SOCI 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 114 ARTOP 1XX Options
CYCW 115 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 201 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 204 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 205 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 206 ARTOP 2XX Options
CYCW 208 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 211 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 302 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 303 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 339 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 340 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 350 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 361 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 466 ARTOP 4XX Options
DESN 270 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
DESN 271 ARTOP2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ECCS 110 PSYC 1XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECCS 160 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 180 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 220 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECCS 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 270 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 310 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 355 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 425 SOCI 4XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 160 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECDV 220 COSL 200 Options
ECDV 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECDV 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 270 COSL 270 Options
ECDV 280 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
FNCE 301 ECON 3XX Options or Economics program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breath
HAPR 101 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HAPR 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
HAPR 114 WINL 200 Options
HAPR 201 ARTOP 2XX Options
HAPR 212 WINL 200 Options
HEED 110 ARTOP 1XX Options
HEED 120 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 104 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 105 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 124 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 128 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 150 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
HLST 290 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
INFM 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
INFM 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 209 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 260 COSL 200 Options
INTA 210 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
INTA 362 ARTOP 3XX Options
MTST 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 122 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 125 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 151, MTST 162, MTST 260, MTST 261, and MTST 262 COSL 200 Options
MUSC 104 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
MUSC 123 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
MUSC 124 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PEDS 100 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 101 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 103 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 109 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 200 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 203 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 206 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 207 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 209 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
PEDS 240 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PERL 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
PERL 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PERL 207 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 102 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 121 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PSSC 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 212 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 252 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 253 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 272 COSL 200 Options
PSSC 273 COSL 200 Options
SOWK 101 ARTOP 1XX Options, fulfills Humanities Breadth
SOWK 111 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
SOWK 204 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
TAST 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
TAST 129 and TAST 130 COSL 200 Options
THAR 240 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THAS 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 102 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
THAS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 203 COSL 200 Options
THAS 210 COSL 200 Options
THAS 211 COSL 200 Options
THAS 215 COSL 200 Options
THAS 222 ARTOP 2XX Options
THPR 205 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 206 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THPR 224 COSL 200 Options
 

Political Science Requirements

Political Science Major

Political Science Honours

Political Science Minor

Political Science Major

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Political Science program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. In addition to the Political Science Major, students will complete one of the following:

  • one minor,
  • two minors, or
  • a secondary Arts major

Students are required to complete option courses as well as the major(s) and minor(s). All BA degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), or options.

The Political Science Major is 42 to 60 non-duplicative political science credits with a minimum of 36 credits at the senior-level. Students must complete a minimum of 18 POLS credits at the 300-level or 400-level with a minimum of six POLS credits at the 400-level, including POLS 490Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Major Requirements.

POLS 221 and POLS 261 cannot be used to fulfill the senior-level POLS requirement.

Bachelor of Arts - Political Science Major
Specific Major Requirements
POLS 101Introduction to Politics3
POLS 200Comparative Political Systems3
POLS 214History of Political Thought I3
POLS 215History of Political Thought II3
POLS 224Canadian National Government I3
POLS 225Canadian National Government II3
POLS 244Introduction to Policy Studies3
POLS 264Introduction to Global Politics 3
POLS 389Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods3
or POLS 399 Empirical Research Methods in Political Science
POLS 490Advanced Study in Political Science3
General Major Requirements
Choose 12 to 30 credits from junior-or senior-level POLS, AEPS, or URBW with a minimum of 15 POLS credits at the 300-level or 400-level including a minimum of three POLS credits at the 400-level. Students may complete a maximum of 6 credits of AEPS or URBW.12-30
Secondary Major or Minor(s)
Students have the option of completing a second Arts major, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level.18-60
Options
Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses.0-60
Total Credits120

Political Science Honours

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) Political Science Honours degree program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. The Political Science Honours program is comprised of 36 credits designated as Specific Honours Requirements (including a 6-credit thesis course), 27 Honours Options, and 57 Options courses taken from outside POLS. Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Honours Requirements.

For consideration of admittance/acceptance into Political Science Honours, students must present the following:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 university-level credits applicable to the program of study, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher
  2. 24 of the 45 credits must have been completed in the last 12 months
  3. A minimum of six POLS credits completed at the senior-level
  4. A minimum GPA of 3.3 across all senior-level POLS courses

Students accepted and enrolled in the Political Science Honours program must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. As well, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 across all senior-level POLS courses for each 12 consecutive months following acceptance into the Honours program. Failure to do so will result in the student's program status reverting to a BA Political Science Major.

Students have the option of completing a minor within the requirements of the Political Science Honours program. Minors are comprised of 18 senior-level credits that are counted with the Options. All BA degrees, including Honours, require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for Honours, minor(s), or options.

Bachelor of Arts - Political Science Honours
Specific Honours Requirements36
POLS 101Introduction to Politics3
POLS 200Comparative Political Systems3
POLS 214History of Political Thought I3
POLS 215History of Political Thought II3
POLS 224Canadian National Government I3
POLS 225Canadian National Government II3
POLS 244Introduction to Policy Studies3
POLS 264Introduction to Global Politics 3
POLS 399Empirical Research Methods in Political Science3
POLS 490Advanced Study in Political Science3
POLS 499AHonours Thesis I3
POLS 499BHonours Thesis II3
General Honours Requirements
Choose 27 credits from senior-level POLS, AEPS, or URBW courses with a minimum of 12 POLS credits at the 300- or 400-level and a minimum of 3 POLS credits at the 400-level. Students may complete a maximum of 6 credits of AEPS or URBW.27
Options (may include a minor (18 credits))
Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses.57
Total Credits120

Political Science Minor

The Political Science Minor requires 18 senior-level POLS, AEPS, or URBW credits. This must include a minimum of nine credits at the 200-level and a minimum of nine credits at the 300- or 400-level, with a maximum of three credits in AEPS or URBW. POLS 221 and POLS 261 cannot be used to meet the minor requirements. Junior-level POLS 101 is not part of the Political Science Minor but may be a prerequisite for required minor courses. Note that 300- or 400-level courses in POLS often require multiple 200-level prerequisites.

Minor Requirements
Choose 9 credits from 200-level POLS, and 9 credits from 300- or 400-level POLS. Students can substitute 3 credits of 300- or 400-level AEPS or URBW for POLS.18
Total Credits18

Degree Regulations

Students are strongly encouraged to seek advice from the academic advisors about academic planning for completing degree requirements at MacEwan University.

Academic Residency - Credit Requirements

In addition to the academic residency requirements of the University, upon admission to the Bachelor of Arts (BA), students also must complete at MacEwan University:

  • A minimum of 24 credits at the senior-level in the major discipline, with 12 of those senior credits completed at the 300- or 400-level. All 400-level requirements are to be completed at MacEwan University.
  • If applicable, a minimum of nine credits at the senior-level in a minor, with at least three of those credits at the 300- or 400- level.

Students with a previous MacEwan University credential are required to complete a minimum of 45 credits upon admission to the BA.

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from another post-secondary institution must complete a minimum of 60 additional MacEwan University credits applicable to the BA. Forty-five of these credits must be completed while the students is enrolled in the BA. This credit requirement applies to students who began their studies at MacEwan University and completed a credential at another institution.

Students who interrupt their program and who must apply for readmission to the program will be required to comply with any new regulations upon resumption of their studies.

Breadth Requirements

Courses taken to fulfil major, minor, or option requirements can also be used to satisfy breadth requirements.

Declaration of a Major and a Minor

Students are advised to declare a primary major and a minor, or a primary major and secondary major, or a primary major and two minors by the time they have completed 45 credits. Primary majors are selected from Arts disciplines and consist of 42 to 60 junior- and senior-level credits; secondary majors can be from an Arts or a Science discipline. Students cannot declare a multi-disciplinary science major (Mathematical or Physical Science majors). Except for those students in an Honours program, a maximum of 60 credits may be completed from any one discipline for credit towards the degree. A major and minor cannot be in the same discipline and students may not declare more than one out-of-faculty minor. Students can re-declare their major(s) and/or minor(s) if required.

For students completing multiple majors or minors, the Faculty cannot guarantee a schedule of classes that will permit the student to complete their degree in eight consecutive fall and winter semesters. Furthermore, depending on the configuration of the student's degree, meeting the requirements for the degree may require the completion of more than 120 credits for graduation. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Advising Office and a discipline advisor in their major and minor disciplines prior to declaration.

Restricted Enrolment Courses

The Faculty of Arts and Science strives to accommodate all students wishing to enrol in a given course when it is appropriate to their own program: however, classes in some courses must, for academic reasons, be restricted in size. If such a course is found to be oversubscribed, priority in registration will be given to those students whose programs may require it (e.g., majors, Honours, and/or minors) and then to other students as space permits.

Graduation Grade Point Average

As part of the Graduation Grade Point Average regulation above, Bachelor of Arts students must obtain an overall GGPA of 2.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the major(s) and a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the minor(s).

Graduation Requirements

Graduation requirements are governed by the date on which students declare their major(s) and minor(s). Students who declare their major(s) and minor(s) on or before the published deadline are bound by the requirements of the current academic year. Those students who declare after the published deadline are bound by the programs of study and degree requirements of the upcoming academic year as published in the MacEwan University Academic Calendar.

Junior- and Senior-Level Courses

Courses numbered from 100 to 199 are considered junior-level and courses numbered from 200 to 499 are considered senior-level.

Major or Minor 300- and 400-Level Requirements

The 300- and 400-level requirements in the major or minor cannot consist solely of project, field placement, and/or individual study courses.

Maximum Independent Courses

The maximum number of credits for independent work (project, field placement, and/or individual study courses), excluding the Honours Thesis, is 15 credits. Specific disciplines may have further restrictions.

Maximum Junior-Level Courses

A maximum of 48 credits at the 100-level are permitted in completion of the BA degree. Additional courses at the 100-level will be declared extra to the 120 credits required to complete the BA degree and will not be counted toward fulfilment of graduation requirements.

Minimum Arts Courses

Students are required to complete successfully a minimum of 72 credits from Arts courses.

Minimum Passing Grade

A minimum grade of D or credit (CR) is required for all Arts degree courses unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. 

Minimum Transfer Grade for Credit

A minimum grade of D is required on any transfer credit granted for the program. Unless otherwise stated, Arts and Science courses require a minimum grade of C- when the course is used as a prerequisite. Transfer credit decisions made by the university are final and cannot be appealed.

Out-of-Faculty Options Requirements

Students may take a maximum of 18 credits from courses offered by a MacEwan University Faculty or School other than Arts and Science. Students completing an out-of-Faculty minor or laddering students who have met the minor requirements with a MacEwan University diploma must complete their degree requirements from courses offered within the Faculty of Arts and Science or from the list of Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions in the Academic Calendar. Courses deemed as Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions are used to fulfill in-Faculty courses within the BA and do not count as out-of-Faculty options. Fine arts courses taken to fulfil breadth requirements count as in-Faculty credit.

Progression of Studies

Students are responsible for ensuring they meet the prerequisite and/or co-requisite requirements as noted on all courses that may fulfil Bachelor of Arts or Arts Honours program requirements.

Honours Regulations

Overall Requirements

The Honours program of study consists of 63 to 84 credits as determined by the discipline. Students in the Honours program may choose to complete a minor outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor.

Acceptance to Honours

For consideration of admittance/acceptance into Honours, students must present a minimum of 45 university-level credits applicable to the program of study, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. They must complete 24 of the 45 credits in the last 12 months; however, exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor. Individual departments may have additional requirements noted in their program of study.

Course Load

Students accepted into an Honours program must complete 24-credits in each twelve consecutive months they are in the program. Exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor.

Grade Point Average Requirement

Students accepted and enrolled in the Arts Honours program must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 across all courses in the degree. As well, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline for each twelve consecutive months following acceptance into the Honours program. Failure to do so will result in the student’s program status reverting to a BA with a major in the previous honours discipline.

Graduation Grade Point Average

In order to graduate, students must obtain an overall GGPA of 3.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline.

Program Learning Outcomes

Faculty of Arts and Science Degree-Level Learning Outcomes

Thinking about knowledge is at the core of University education and learning within the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students develop capacities to “think-through” - to practice wonder, reflection, and engage in thoughtful inquiry and dialogue. Thinking-through involves questioning beyond the confines of one's immediate personal, social, and disciplinary surroundings. First, knowledge is acquired and understood. Learning moves beyond acquiring information and data to a formally disciplined manner of thinking about knowledge. Next, knowledge is interrogated by asking and answering questions, distinguishing between opinion and knowledge, and developing tools to assess reasons and evidence. Finally, knowledge is synthesized as students develop coherent arguments, and link ideas together beyond what is immediately apparent. Learning is a lifelong creative process of discovery and action that happens beyond the classroom and the degree. Our graduates interact with and contribute to their community by integrating and applying the research and communication skills and ways of knowing developed through their education. Learning outcomes capture the observable knowledge, skills, and abilities graduates acquire that are the foundation of learning.

Graduates will demonstrate their ability to “think-through” by:

  1. Analysing puzzles, problems, concepts, and theories.
  2. Conceptualizing questions based on disciplinary knowledge.
  3. Evaluating knowledge within and across disciplines in ways that acknowledge historical, cultural, and social contexts.

Graduates will demonstrate research and scholarship skills by:

  1. Applying appropriate research skills and ethical principles.
  2. Interpreting results appreciating the value and limits of conclusions.
  3. Recognizing how research involves an ongoing process of reflection, dialogue, and reassessment.

Graduates will demonstrate diverse skills for communication by:

  1. Conveying complex ideas coherently in a variety of formats.
  2. Appraising information in ways that consider context and audience.
  3. Interpreting the ideas and arguments of others in ways that reflect their knowledge, judgement, and comprehension.

Graduates will demonstrate durable skills necessary for learning beyond their degree by:

  1. Collaborating with diverse groups.
  2. Examining different perspectives and challenging biases and preconceptions.
  3. Exploring the continuous impact and limitations of disciplinary knowledge and expertise.

Political Science Major Program Learning Outcomes

Political science students are trained to approach their understanding of the world with reflexivity and openness. Political Science in particular emphasizes the use of analytical concepts, theories, and models to make sense of complicated real-world issues – whether these issues are found in Canada or around the world. The tools used by Political Scientists help order facts and information about the world in a comprehensible and methodologically rigorous way.

Political Science itself is not monolithic and comprises a number of interrelated subfields, each focusing on a different subsection of the political world. Students who complete the degree will obtain a broad understanding of the discipline of Political Science and its related subfields, including: Political Philosophy, Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.

The foundational knowledge that is required to make sense of complex, real-world issues begins in the lower-level 100 and 200 level courses. In these early year courses, students are taught the analytical and theoretical tools needed to apply general knowledge to case and issue specific areas (300 and 400 level courses). Akin to learning a common language, graduates learn the ‘theoretical language’ that enables them to engage in meaningful discussions about the nature of politics across the discipline and various stakeholders in the political world – ranging from government, non-government, and other third parties.

PLO 1 – General and Specific Knowledge
The basis of a degree in Political Science is found in the cultivation of knowledge and understanding. Thus, a degree in political science begins with the assumption that it is insufficient to simply ‘know’ facts – one must know what to do with these facts first and foremost. As Martin Hollis notes, “without adequacy on the level of meaning, our generalisations remain mere statements of statistical probability, either not intelligible at all or only imperfectly intelligible” (Hollis, 183, 2002). Understanding is based on a foundation of knowledge as well as an appreciation for both how information is generated and how it can, and should, be contextualized. Not merely an academic exercise, uncovering the normative underpinnings of the every day yields insights into the hidden processes and legacies of policies that comprise one’s daily life. Graduates learn to identify these, often, hidden processes that help make up every day and to question things that are, at times, taken for granted.

The political science degree equips students with both a general understanding of how the world works, but also an in-depth understanding of a limited number of real-world issues and cases. Thus, while the political science degree builds general knowledge, it also encourages specialization as well, particularly through the Honours programme. Above all, students in political science learn that they are connected to a much larger world in ways that they would otherwise not be aware.

PLO 2 – Reflexivity
A key aspect of the cultivation of knowledge is not simply the learning of theories, concepts and models, but rather the cultivation of reflexivity. To this end, by expanding the scope of their knowledge and awareness of issues, students also develop an awareness of the limits of their knowledge. Broadly speaking this involves the development of tools to critically self-assess and self-evaluate one’s own knowledge. By extension, students learn to develop new and novel ways to expand their understanding of real-world issues not only by learning which questions need to be asked but how to ask questions in the first place. In learning how to ask questions, a degree in political science cultivates curiosity and appreciation of the complexity of the “every day.” Thus, the political science degree is not just about expanding their knowledge but also cultivating an appreciation for the political world, by learning what the limits of their knowledge are and how to push those limits.

In so doing, students cultivate a curiosity that continuously aims to challenge their own worldview and understanding. The Political Science degree encourages the development of these skills not just in the subject matter taught, but in the collaborative environment in which learning takes place.

PLO 3 – Tools to Address Real World Problems
It is not sufficient to simply pose questions, one must be able to answer them as well. As such, the Political Science degree emphasizes methodological diversity. Students learn to conduct empirical research, utilizing both positivist and non-positivist approaches, in order to both explain and understand political events. Through specialized methods training, graduates learn how to approach questions from different angles and learn that there may be multiple solutions to a single problem – depending on the angle that they take. This holistic, and academically rigorous, approach to understanding is vitally important not just for making sense of political events, but for offering novel solutions as well. 

PLO 4 – Communication and Engagement
Like most degrees, Political Science emphasizes both written and oral communication skills. Political Science graduates are frequently communicating directly with policy-makers and stakeholders in the political world. The Political Science degree, therefore, trains students to be able to articulate their understanding to a wide range of audiences. In doing so, students come to recognize that people interact, understand, and relate to the world differently depending upon their own backgrounds and experiences. Students learn how to communicate their understanding of the world in a way that is appreciable to people from diverse backgrounds who are not interpreting events from the same frames of reference. In a sense, political science graduates gain the ability to express, engage, and question opinions and arguments while being able to understand the merits of competing and explanations. 

Student Plan

  • The student plan provides a suggested course sequence with the minimum number of credits required for the major
  • The suggested course sequence depends on course availability, the student's schedule, and the student's choice of minor(s) or secondary major
  • It is highly recommended that students complete their Breadth Requirements by the end of year 2
  • Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Major Requirements
Year 1Credits
POLS 1013
ENGL 1023
Breadth Requirements24
 30
Year 2Credits
POLS 2003
POLS 2143
POLS 2153
POLS 2243
POLS 2253
POLS 2443
POLS 2643
Breadth, Option, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements9
 30
Year 3Credits
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from the following:3
Choose 6 credits (2 courses) from 300- or 400-level POLS6
Options, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements21
 30
Year 4Credits
POLS 4903
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from 400-level POLS3
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from 300- or 400-level POLS3
Options, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements21
 30
Total Credits 120
 

Expected Course Offerings

Following is a list of expected course offerings for fall 2024 and winter 2025. We will update the list with expected courses scheduled for fall 2025 and winter 2026 in February 2024. In addition to the specific courses listed below, Political Science typically offers additional 300- and 400-level courses each year across a range of subfields. Specific topics will vary depending on instructor availability and current events (see the complete list of POLS courses for examples of additional courses that may be offered), but students can be assured that required courses will be available annually. 

Fall 2024
Introduction to Politics
Comparative Political Systems
History of Political Thought I
Canadian National Government I
Introduction to Policy Studies
Introduction to Global Politics
Ancient Political Philosophy
Introduction to Public Administration
Canadian Federalism
American Politics
Empirical Research Methods in Political Science
Topics in Policy Studies
Selected Topics in International Politics
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics
Advanced Study in Political Science
Winter 2025
Introduction to Politics
Comparative Political Systems
History of Political Thought II
Canadian National Government II
Introduction to Global Politics
Topics in European Politics
Environmental Policy and Politics
Fundamentals of Policy Analysis
International Political Economy
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Topics in Political Science
Topics in Political Philosophy
Advanced Topics in Canadian Politics
Advanced Study in Political Science
Political Science Field Placement
 

Admission Requirements

Applicants may be admitted to one of the following:

Regular Admission 

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must have a minimum overall average of 65 percent, with no course grade lower than 50 percent, in the following high school courses:

  1. ELA 30-1
  2. Four subjects from Group A, B, C, or D

Notes:

  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to present a broad range of subjects in order to benefit from the breadth of learning and to increase flexibility of future program and course choices.
  • A maximum of two Group B subjects may be presented; they must be from different disciplines.
  • A maximum of one Group D subject may be presented. Group D subjects used for admission must be 5-credit or any credit combination of at least 5 credits (e.g., two 3-credit subjects).
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Economics.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 31 is required for Economics Honours.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Psychology.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Mature Admission

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must be Canadian Applicants, 20 years of age or older, and have been out of full-time high school at least one year by the beginning of the intake term. Applicants must have the following:

  • ELA 30-1 with a minimum grade of 65 percent (or equivalent)

OR

  • Three credits of university-level English, including ENGL 111 from MacEwan University, with a minimum grade of C.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Previous Post-Secondary Work

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Admission in this category does not imply or guarantee the transfer of any coursework and/or credential unless a block transfer agreement (internal or external) is in effect and published in the calendar by the Office of the University Registrar. In addition, transfer of coursework does not imply or guarantee that an applicant will be admitted.

Applicants must have successfully completed the following from a recognized institution:

  • A minimum of 24 university-level credits with a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Additional Admission Criteria

All applicants must meet the following:

1. English Language Proficiency

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

All applicants must meet an acceptable level of English language proficiency. We will require official documents such as high school or post-secondary transcripts or proof of successful completion of standardized language evaluation. Full details are available in MacEwan University’s academic calendar or online at MacEwan.ca/ELP.

2. Other Admission Criteria

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

Applicants who have been assigned two unsatisfactory academic records within the past five years will not be considered for admission or re-admission to the program until a minimum three years from the date of the assignment of the last unsatisfactory academic record. For the purpose of admission or re-admission, an unsatisfactory record is defined as a transcript with the notation ‘required to withdraw’ or equivalent.

Political Science Courses

POLS 101
Introduction to Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to a systematic study of the primary institutions and processes of modern government and the discipline of political science. Students explore the significant concepts, methods, approaches, and issues of the discipline, considered necessary for the study of politics. Topics include political power, political authority, sovereignty and the state, the nation, constitutionalism, international relations, political ideology, elections, and electoral systems, democracy, and totalitarianism. Note: this course is the prerequisite for most second year Political Science courses.

POLS 200
Comparative Political Systems
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces the concepts, methods and substance of the field of comparative politics, covering selected developed and developing countries. Contemporary politics of the selected countries will be studied in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Political and governmental institutions and public policies of the selected countries will be examined in relation to their responses to changing domestic and global environments. This is a core course in the field of comparative politics and a prerequisite for most 300- and 400-level courses in the field.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 101.

POLS 214
History of Political Thought I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to classical and medieval political thought through the careful reading of primary texts. Authors studied may vary from year to year and section to section, but each is considered somehow representative or thematically significant to the period in question. Names typically examined include Homer, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Note: This is a core course in the field of political philosophy.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 101.

POLS 215
History of Political Thought II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Building upon the skills and knowledge acquired in POLS 214, this course introduces students to modern political thought through the careful reading of primary texts. Authors typically include some of the following: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, and Nietzsche. Authors may vary from year to year and section to section, but each is considered somehow representative or thematically significant to the period in question. Note: This is a core course in the field of political philosophy.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 214.

POLS 221
Canadian Political Realities
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introductory course in Canadian politics designed for students who do not intend to take more senior courses in the field of Canadian politics. The course involves study of the politics of institutions and the processes of the government of Canada. Students  demonstrate understanding of the major challenges facing Canada in its political development. Note:This course does not count toward the senior level credit requirement for the major/minor or honours.

POLS 224
Canadian National Government I
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

POLS 224 and 225 are the core courses in the field of Canadian politics, introducing students to the institutions, processes, concepts and important issues of this subject area. Topics include the Constitution and federalism, region and province, French Canada and Quebec, Indigenous peoples, ethnicity, immigration and multiculturalism, gender, class, and Canada's role in the world.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 101.

POLS 225
Canadian National Government II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

POLS 224 and 225 are the core courses in the field of Canadian politics, introducing students to the institutions, processes, concepts and important issues of this subject area. Topics include the political process, political parties, elections and representation, Parliament, the executive, bureaucracy, the judiciary, and fiscal, economic and other policy issues in Canada.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 224.

POLS 244
Introduction to Policy Studies
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the process and practice of policy making in modern governments. It examines the key actors, institutions and dynamics involved in policy making. It covers different aspects of policy making, including government agenda-setting and decision making, the tools governments use to address pressing societal issues and achieve their goals, and how governments implement and evaluate those policies. Particular attention is paid to the changing context in which policy making occurs and the current challenges and opportunities policy makers face.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 101.

POLS 261
Asia Pacific Political Systems
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The purpose of this survey course is to introduce students to the political systems of ten Asia-Pacific countries: China, including Hong Kong and Taiwan, Brunei; Indonesia; Singapore; Malaysia; The Philippines; Japan; South Korea; Thailand; and Vietnam. This dynamic region of the world exhibits a range of political systems, from constitutional monarchies to one-party dominant states. This course emphasizes the linkages between the economic and political development and the cultural catalysts and obstacles to both processes. The processes of regional and global economic integration of the countries in the region are discussed. The course explores other topics such as the following: constitutional development, legislature, political executive, judiciary, political culture and socialization, political parties and pressure groups, public opinion and the mass media, public enterprises and bureaucracy; and foreign policy. Note: This course does not count toward the senior level credit requirement for the major/minor or honours.

POLS 264
Introduction to Global Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the study of global politics. Topics include the theories of international relations, the dynamics of interaction among states and non-state actors, the nature of power, globalization, foreign policy, war and peace, international political economy, international organizations and, international law.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 101, or second-year standing.

POLS 265
Introduction to Global Politics II
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines major issues in the global political economy and global governance. Topics include the theoretical approaches to international political economy, international trade, global finance, multinational corporations, international development assistance, North-South relations, migration, the UN and global governance, international law, regional integration, the environment, international terrorism, and human rights.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 304
Topics in European Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the analysis of selected issues in European Politics. It includes theoretical, empirical, institutional, and policy analysis, as well as a research component. For detailed information concerning the current course offering please consult the department. Note: This course can be taken up to two times, provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 200.

POLS 307
Continental Political Thought
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course carefully examines the major themes that develop within the tradition of 19th and 20th century Continental Political Thought beginning with German Idealism and ending with Existentialism. Authors to be studied may include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Martin Heidegger.

Prerequisites: minimum grade of C- in POLS 214 and 215, or consent of the department.

POLS 308
Political Thought of the Enlightenment
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course introduces students to the central works in political philosophy of the Enlightenment. In studying classic texts from the French, British, and American Enlightenments, the course further aims to discern, within these texts, the intellectual sources of liberal modernity. Students study the work of some of the following: Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Adam Smith, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Montesquieu, Benjamin Constant, The Federalist, Thomas Jefferson and Alexis de Tocqueville.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 214 and POLS 215.

POLS 309
Ancient Political Philosophy
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course carefully examines one or more of the classic texts of ancient political philosophy. The course is organized around a major concern of ancient political philosophy. Potential topics include the nature of political community, sources of civic virtue, rhetoric, classic natural right, and the relationship of philosophy to politics. Addressing these topics entails the careful study of major texts by some of the following: Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Cicero, Lucretius and St. Augustine.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 214 and 215, or consent of the department.

POLS 315
Contemporary Liberal Thought
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the exploration of contemporary liberal political thought. It covers selected readings from recent liberal philosophers and their critics, as well as considering debates about the values of liberalism in their application to public issues such as distributive justice, multiculturalism, and religion in society.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 214 and 215, or consent of the department.

POLS 316
Political Thought After Nietzsche
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the close reading of selected texts in 20th century thought that attempt to come to grips with Nietzsche’s fundamental criticism of enlightenment rationality as the foundation for a democratic political order. Special attention is paid to those authors, largely German, who chart an alternative course to French postmodernism. Authors to be discussed may include: Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Leo Strauss, Hans-georg Gadamer, Hannah Arendt, Reinhold Neibuhr, Emmanuel Levinas, and Alasdair MacIntyre.

Prerequisites: C- in POLS 214 and POLS 215 or consent of the department.

POLS 321
Introduction to Public Administration
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course explores the theoretical foundations and contemporary practice of public management and governance in Canada. This includes identifying institutions and processes through which public administration is conducted and assessing how public servants contribute to democratic governance. Major themes and debates within the field are discussed as well as the practical issues public servants face and the changing environment within which they work. The course primarily focuses on the federal government, but includes discussion of public administration in provincial, municipal and Indigenous governments.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 244 or consent of the department.

POLS 324
Topics in Canadian Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the detailed study of a single topic area in Canadian politics. Examples of topic areas include democracy and democratic reform, electoral politics and political parties, Canadian political thought, the Charter of Rights and judicial review, public policy, political cleavages in Canada, the politics of environmentalism, local government, and media and politics. Students may take this course up to two times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 224 and 225, or consent of the department.

POLS 327
Politics of Identity in Canada
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the exploration of the role of identities in Canadian politics. Among the core areas of interest in this area are questions about the relationship of indigenous peoples to the state, the role and cultural influence of the country's earliest settlement groups, regional and provincial sources of identity, ethnicity, immigration and multiculturalism, gender, socio-economic class and emergent forms of politically salient identity, and Canadian national identity.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 224 and POLS 225.

POLS 329
Canadian Federalism
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the systematic study of the evolution, institutions, challenges, and theoretical underpinnings of the Canadian Federal system.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 224 and POLS 225.

POLS 330
The Canadian Constitution I: The Constitution Act, 1867 and Indigenous Constitutional Issues
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the exploration of the foundation of Canada's legal and constitutional system, the Constitution Act, 1867, Indigenous-state constitutional issues, and the role and impact of these aspects of Canada's constitution in the country’s politics and culture. Note POLS 330 and POLS 331 may be taken in any order. Students cannot receive credit for both POLS 326 and POLS 330.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in POLS 224 and 225 or consent of the department.

POLS 331
Canadian Constitution II: The Constitution Act, 1982, Charter of Rights, & Constitutional Change
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is devoted to the exploration of the Constitution Act, 1982 (which includes the Charter of Rights and Freedoms), issues, processes, and debate around major constitutional change in Canada, and the role and impact of these aspects of the country's constitution in its politics and culture. Note POLS 330 and POLS 331 may be taken in any order. Students cannot receive credit for both POLS 326 and POLS 331.

Prerequisite: Minimum grades of C- in POLS 224 and 225 or consent of the department.

POLS 343
Environmental Policy and Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers an examination of environmental issues in Canada, one of the most rapidly-developing policy fields in the last half century. The course focuses on a range of issues related to the natural environment by exploring the salient actors in environmental politics, the institutions and processes used to develop environmental policies, and how environmental issues are defined and understood by different political ideologies.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 244 or consent of the department.

POLS 344
Fundamentals of Policy Analysis
3 Credits          (3-0-0)

This course applies economic concepts and techniques to practical policy problems that governments face, including the provision of public goods and the regulation of private individuals and businesses. Students will learn how to conduct different types of economic analyses that assist governments in deciding when and where to address a problem and how to choose between different solutions. This course provides students with an entry point to the profession of policy analysis. Note: Students can only receive credit for one of ECON 344 or POLS 344.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 244 or consent of the department.

POLS 345
Issues in Globalization and Governance
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers a comprehensive study of some of the major issues in the areas of Globalization and Global Governance. Topics include: Global Governance theory, the Global Political Economy, Global Security Challenges, the Global Financial System, the Global Civic Ethic, Poverty and Globalization, UN Reform, and the Global Environmental Challenge.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 349
Topics in Global Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course covers current controversial issues in global politics. Selected topics include the international political economy, the international strategic system, global challenges, and international relations theory.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 357
The Third World in Global Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course assesses challenges facing the Third World in the global economy. Students focus on the specific constraints faced by the developing countries in the era of globalization, while assessing opportunities and options for overcoming the structural constraints. The institutional underpinnings of the Third World movement - the non-aligned movement and the group of 77 - as well as the specific regional and interregional responses to globalization are analyzed.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or POLS 264.

POLS 361
Conflicts and Civil Wars in International Relations
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Large-scale violence associated with interstate and intrastate conflict and war continues to have undeniable relevance for all of humanity. Given the rise of ethnic conflicts in Europe and proliferation of advanced weapons technology worldwide, providing answers to pressing questions about the onset and escalation of war is imperative in the aftermath of the Cold War. This course examines the theoretical and empirical knowledge on the causes of interstate wars and civil wars.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 362
Pursuit of Peace in Global Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

A dominant feature of the post-World War II international system is the willingness of states and international organizations to intervene, often forcefully, to manage conflicts. This course examines the theoretical and empirical foundations of the study of conflict management since the end of the Second World War.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 364
International Political Economy
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This is a critical examination of the conjunction of a series of market and political issues in international affairs, including the major facets of globalization. The course uses major theoretical perspectives to explain the intersection of states and markets in the global economy. Topics include: the global trading system, foreign direct investment, foreign portfolio investment, international debt problems, the impact of the international financial institutions, North-South relations, and balancing development with environmental protection.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 365
Canadian Foreign Policy
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This is an overview of the significant post-Second World War developments in Canadian foreign policy. This course assesses Canada's foreign policy priorities, orientations and sources. Topics addressed include the following: Canadian security, development assistance, role in international organizations, Canada and the global economy, the human security agenda, and the role of non-governmental organizations in shaping Canadian foreign policy.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 368
International Organization
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the theoretical and empirical evolution of International Organizations. The course includes an active learning component, using simulation of the United Nations and/or other intergovernmental organizations. It deals with global governance as well as specific issue-areas such as human rights, peace, disarmament, development, and the environment. Students cannot receive credit for both POLS 368 and POLS 468.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 264 or consent of the department.

POLS 370
American Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the American political system through the study of the institutional framework of the three separate federal branches, the motivation behind its organization, and the way political actors’ and political institutions’ interaction are shaped by this organizational structure. This course is appropriate for political science majors who wish to gain a foundation and a better understanding of American politics.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or consent of the department.

POLS 371
Politics in China
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines Chinese politics in its historical, cultural, social, and global settings. The focus of this course is on the responses of China's political system to its domestic and international challenges in the modern time.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or POLS 261 or POLS 263.

POLS 373
Politics in India
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines the Indian political system in its historical, cultural, social, and global settings. The responses of India's contemporary political system to its domestic and international challenges are studied in combination with the impact of India's colonial experience.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or POLS 261 or POLS 263.

POLS 375
Politics of East Asia
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides comparative studies and analyses of politics of East Asia. Focused topics include politics of China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. Comparisons and analyses cover a variety of subjects such as political institutions and processes, ideologies, and public policies.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or consent of the department.

POLS 376
Issues in Development Studies
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an understanding of the core theoretical and practical development-related issues confronting countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. It presents the contending development theories, while focusing on the significant development challenges facing the developing countries - both domestic and global.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 200 or POLS 264.

POLS 389
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
3 Credits          weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to qualitative research methods in political science. Students will learn to undertake both positivist and interpretivist research in political science. In addition to learning formal methods, students apply these methods by learning to conduct primary data collection, including: designing surveys, conducting semi-structured elite interviews, and undertaking ethnographic research to address questions related to Political Science.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 101 and 6 credits of 200-level POLS courses.

POLS 390
Topics in Political Science
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines a substantive topic or topics of relevance to Political Science. The topic for the course varies and is announced prior to registration. This course may be taken up to two times provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in a 200 level course in Political Science.

POLS 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the student’s project.

POLS 399
Empirical Research Methods in Political Science
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course is a general introduction to empirical research methods in Political Science.  Students learn the logic and working assumptions behind empirical research in Political Science, and gain practice with those methods to ask and answer specific research questions in Political Science using a statistical software.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 101 and 6 credits of 200-level POLS courses.

POLS 410
Topics in Political Philosophy
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This is a seminar course for students interested in advanced study of specialized areas of political philosophy. This course is devoted to the detailed study of a single topic. Examples of topics include the following: virtue and politics, theories of the State, the limits of reason, and problems of political community. Students may take this course up to two times provided the topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 214 and POLS 215, or consent of the department.

POLS 424
Advanced Topics in Canadian Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This is a seminar course for students interested in advanced study of specialized areas of Canadian politics. This course is devoted to the detailed study of a single topic area. Examples of topic areas include democracy and democratic reform, electoral politics and political parties, Canadian political thought, the Charter of Rights and judicial review, political cleavages in Canada, the politics of environmentalism, and the media and politics in Canada.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 225.

POLS 426
Canadian Law and Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course is devoted to the systematic study of the issues, history, and scholarly commentary associated with law, politics, and the judicial process in Canada. The course includes consideration of topics such as legal theory, judicial politics and issues of judicial selection and appointment, the implications of rights review for democracy, and core cases in constitutional litigation. The course concludes with student participation in a simulated legal case on a constitutional issue.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of POLS 326, POLS 330, POLS 331, or POLS 329 or consent of the department.

POLS 444
Topics in Policy Studies
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This is a seminar course for students interested in specialized topics within policy studies. The course provides an in-depth and detailed examination of a single topic. Students will develop expertise in a specific area that can build a foundation for graduate studies or employment. Potential topics include public governance, theories of the policy process, specific policy dynamics such as networks, learning or agenda-setting and policy areas like climate change, health, social or economic policy. The instructor chooses the topic in any given semester. Students can take this course up to two times, provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 244.

POLS 461
Selected Topics in International Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course focuses on selected contemporary topics in the sub-fields of international relations. Students undertake a detailed analysis of a specific topic. The instructor chooses the topic in any given semester. Students can take this course up to two times, provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in POLS 264.

POLS 470
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course focuses on the analysis of advanced topics in Comparative Politics. It includes theoretical, empirical, institutional, and policy analysis, as well as a research component. For detailed information concerning the current course offering please consult the department. Note: This course can be taken up to two times, provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in POLS 200.

POLS 471
Comparative Development
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This seminar compares politics of two developing countries: China and India. The course addresses the distinctive developmental issues and common political challenges facing both countries and distinctive developmental issues in each of these countries. Theoretical perspectives on political development are examined.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in any of POLS 371,373, 375 and 376.

POLS 490
Advanced Study in Political Science
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course focuses on the analysis of selected issues in the fields of Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Policy Studies, or Political Philosophy. It includes a detailed research component. This is a required course in the Political Science major. Note: This course may be taken up to two times provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in POLS 200, POLS 214, POLS 215, POLS 224, POLS 225, POLS 264, and either POLS 244 or POLS 265, or consent of the department.

POLS 495
Political Science Field Placement
3 Credits          Total (45-0-125)

This course allows students to bridge the gap between the theory and practice of politics. Students are assigned to a public, private, or non-profit organization where they apply their knowledge of political science and use their skills, including research, analysis and communication, to work on projects or tasks within their partner organization. Note: This course does not fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major and minor.

Prerequisites: A minimum of C- in 6 credits of 300-level political science and consent of the department.

POLS 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits a senior-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrollment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the student’s project.

Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

POLS 499A
Honours Thesis I
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty supervisor registered students  conduct a research project culminating in a written Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings.  This course is restricted to, and required of, students in the Honours Political Science Program. Students complete both POLS 499A and POLS 499B in consecutive terms to attain credit for this course.

Prerequisite: Registration in the Honours Program and consent of the department.

POLS 499B
Honours Thesis II
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty member, students conduct a research project culminating in the Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings. Note: This course is restricted to, and required of, students in the Honours Political Science program. Students complete both POLS 499A and 499B in consecutive terms to attain credit for this course.

Prerequisite: Registration in the Honours Program and consent of the department.