Academic Calendar

Anthropology - Bachelor of Arts

Overview

What makes us human? Whether it’s our past, present, or future, anthropology asks essential questions about human variation, adaptation, and cultural diversity. Learn to recognize and respect human diversity and use your understanding of cultural differences in a globalizing world by exploring topics such as social inequality, material culture, human evolution, language, and the application of anthropological skills to contemporary human challenges. Gain hands-on experience, conduct research projects, and go into the field. Anthropologists work in a wide variety of careers, including professional archaeology, forensic science, market research, language revitalization projects, medicine, government, intercultural education, and climate change responses.

Contact Information

Department of Anthropology, Economics, and Political Science
Room 7-368, City Centre Campus
10700 - 104 Avenue
Edmonton, AB T5J 4S2
T: 780-633-3890

Arts and Science Academic Advising
Room 6-211, City Centre Campus
T: 780-497-4505
E: artsandscience@macewan.ca

The Bachelor of Arts

Faculty of Arts and Science
MacEwan.ca/BA

MacEwan University’s Bachelor of Arts (BA) provides a liberal arts education that allows students to explore a variety of academic disciplines and acquire a broad knowledge base that will prepare them for employment or future post-secondary studies. The degree provides students with breadth, depth, and diversity in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, analytical studies, and fine arts, as well as courses focused on language and literature. BA students study subjects in major and/or minor disciplines and must be familiar with the academic and Faculty regulations and procedures published herein.

General Program Information

The BA program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. The degree emphasizes breadth and depth and has been designed for exceptional flexibility and customization. Students can complete a major and a minor, a double major, or a major and two minors. Students can choose a secondary major in an Arts or Science discipline, but the primary major must be in an Arts discipline.

All newly admitted students enter the BA program as “Undeclared.”  Undeclared means a student has not yet chosen their major(s) and minor(s). Students may declare at any time after being accepted to the BA, and typically, they declare after completing a minimum of 45 credits. The declaration period for noncompetitive majors and minors is between September 1 and February 15 and between September 1 and January 15 for competitive majors and minors. The Arts and Science Academic Advising Office will send information about majors and minors via email and newsletters; please contact the Advising Office if you require further assistance with this decision.

Arts Disciplines

Discipline Major Minor Honours
Anthropology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Classics - ⦿ -
Creative Writing - ⦿ -
Economics ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
English ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Film Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
French - ⦿ -
Gender Studies - ⦿ -
History ⦿ ⦿ -
Philosophy ⦿ ⦿ -
Political Science ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Psychology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Sociology ⦿ ⦿ ⦿
Spanish - ⦿ -

Science Disciplines 

Discipline Major Minor
Applied Statistics ⦿
Biological Sciences ⦿ ⦿
Chemistry ⦿ ⦿
Computer Science ⦿ ⦿
Earth and Planetary Sciences ⦿
Environmental Sciences ⦿
Mathematics ⦿ ⦿
Physics ⦿
Planetary Physics ⦿
Statistics ⦿

Out of Faculty Minors

Discipline Minor
Accounting Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Arts and Cultural Management ⦿
Business Law ⦿
Business Studies ⦿
Digital Experience Design ⦿
Finance Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Human Resources Minor for Arts and Science ⦿
Marketing Minor for Arts and Science ⦿

Laddering a Diploma into the Bachelor of Arts

Students with an accredited diploma can ladder into the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and use some of their diploma coursework towards their degree requirements. If you have questions about the diploma laddering, please visit www.macewan.ca/bastudent or contact artsandscience@macewan.ca.

Preparing for Professional Studies

Students intending to enter professional programs at other universities, such as law and education, can take their pre-professional studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at MacEwan University. For example, a selection of courses facilitates the transition to an after-degree education program or, if the student prefers, transfer to a Bachelor of Education program after completing as many as 60 credits of coursework. Students are advised to consult the admissions requirements for the universities and programs of their choice and to select their MacEwan University courses accordingly. Completing pre-professional courses at MacEwan University does not guarantee admission to the subsequent professional program. Each professional program requires a separate application, and entry is competitive, not automatic.

Degree Requirements

Breadth Requirements

 All Bachelor of Arts degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), Honours, or options. 

Breadth Element Description Credits
Literacy ENGL 102 and 3 credits in university English (not including ENGL 111, ENGL 108, or ENGL 211), and 6 credits in a single language other than English or 6 credits in world literature (COMP 102 and COMP 103) 12
Humanities CLAS, HIST, HUMN, or PHIL 6
Sciences ASTR, BICM, BIOL, BOTN, CHEM, CMPT, EASC, GENE, PHYS, PSYC, SCIE, or ZOOL 6
Social Sciences ANTH, ECON, GEND, POLS, PSYC, or SOCI 6
Analytical Studies LING 101, MATH, PHIL 125, or STAT 3
Fine Arts AGAD, ARTE, CRWR, DESN, DRMA, MUSC, THAR, THPR, CLAS 252, CLAS 352, CLAS 353, or CLAS 356 3

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Program Element Description Credits
Primary Major The Arts major will range from 42 to 60 credits with a minimum 36 credits taken at the senior-level. 42-60
Secondary Major or Minor(s) Students have the option of completing a second major in an Arts or Science discipline, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level. 18-60
Options Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses. Up to 60
Total Degree Credits Including Breadth 120
 
 
 

Bachelor of Arts Honours 

Program Element Description Credits
Minimum Honour Requirements Honours requirements are determined by each discipline. 63
Option Courses, Non-Compulsory Honours Courses, and/or a Minor Students have the option of completing a minor from outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor. 57
Total Degree Credits 120

The minimum passing grade for a course at MacEwan University is a D unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. In the Faculty of Arts and Science, students typically require a minimum grade of C- to use a course as a prerequisite. Please check course descriptions for more information.

 

Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions 

Cross-Faculty course recognition represents an agreement between programs within MacEwan University and consists of a number of approved courses that have the potential to be recognized within another degree. These courses are not considered transfers or equivalents as the original course will show within a student's transcript and their Academic Planning and Progress Report (APPR). How the courses listed below might be used within a student’s degree are determined by the student’s program of study. They are dependent on a number of factors including year of declaration, year of completion, and individual program requirements.

Out-of-Faculty Course Course Recognition Course Used For
ACUP 117 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ACUP 209 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
ACUP 220, ACUP 303, and ACUP 304 (must complete all three) COSL 200 (6 credits) Options
ACUP 320 SCIOP 3XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
AGAD 300 COSL 300 Options
AGAD 435 WINL 300 Options
ARTE 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
ARTE 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 224 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 234 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 304 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 314 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ARTE 324 ARTOP 3XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
CORR 102 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 104 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 110 SOCI 225 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 120 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
CORR 214 COSL 200 Options
CORR 218 SOCI 321 Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CORR 224 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 100 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 108 and CYCW 112 SOCI 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 114 ARTOP 1XX Options
CYCW 115 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 201 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 204 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 205 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 206 ARTOP 2XX Options
CYCW 208 COSL 200 Options
CYCW 211 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
CYCW 302 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 303 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 339 ARTOP 3XX Options
CYCW 340 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 350 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 361 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
CYCW 466 ARTOP 4XX Options
DESN 270 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
DESN 271 ARTOP2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
ECCS 110 PSYC 1XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECCS 160 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
ECCS 180 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 220 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECCS 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 270 COSL 200 Options
ECCS 310 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 355 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 360 SOCI 3XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECCS 425 SOCI 4XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 160 ARTOP 1XX Options
ECDV 220 COSL 200 Options
ECDV 255 ARTOP 2XX Options
ECDV 260 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
ECDV 270 COSL 270 Options
ECDV 280 PSYC 2XX Options or Psychology program requirements; fulfills Social Science or Science Breadth
FNCE 301 ECON 3XX Options or Economics program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breath
HAPR 101 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HAPR 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
HAPR 114 WINL 200 Options
HAPR 201 ARTOP 2XX Options
HAPR 212 WINL 200 Options
HEED 110 ARTOP 1XX Options
HEED 120 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 104 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 105 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 124 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLSC 128 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 150 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
HLST 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
HLST 290 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
INFM 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
INFM 202 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 208 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 209 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 210 ARTOP 2XX Options
INFM 260 COSL 200 Options
INTA 210 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
INTA 362 ARTOP 3XX Options
MTST 120 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 122 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 125 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 126 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
MTST 151, MTST 162, MTST 260, MTST 261, and MTST 262 COSL 200 Options
MUSC 104 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
MUSC 123 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
MUSC 124 ARTOP 1XX Options; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PEDS 100 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 101 BIOL 1XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 103 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 109 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 200 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 203 SCIOP 2XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 206 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 207 BIOL 2XX Options or Biological Sciences program requirements; fulfills Science Breadth
PEDS 209 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
PEDS 240 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
PERL 104 ARTOP 1XX Options
PERL 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PERL 207 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 102 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
PSSC 121 SOCI 1XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
PSSC 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 204 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 212 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 252 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 253 ARTOP 2XX Options
PSSC 272 COSL 200 Options
PSSC 273 COSL 200 Options
SOWK 101 ARTOP 1XX Options, fulfills Humanities Breadth
SOWK 111 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 112 ARTOP 1XX Options
SOWK 203 ARTOP 2XX Options
SOWK 204 SOCI 2XX Options or Sociology program requirements; fulfills Social Science Breadth
TAST 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
TAST 129 and TAST 130 COSL 200 Options
THAR 240 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THAS 101 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 102 SCIOP 1XX Options; fulfills Science Breadth
THAS 115 ARTOP 1XX Options
THAS 203 COSL 200 Options
THAS 210 COSL 200 Options
THAS 211 COSL 200 Options
THAS 215 COSL 200 Options
THAS 222 ARTOP 2XX Options
THPR 205 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 206 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Humanities Breadth
THPR 214 ARTOP 2XX Options; fulfills Analytical Studies Breadth
THPR 224 COSL 200 Options

Anthropology Requirements

Anthropology Major

Anthropology Honours

Anthropology Minor

Anthropology Major

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Anthropology program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. In addition to the Anthropology Major, students will complete one of the following:

  • one minor,
  • two minors, or
  • a secondary Arts major

Students are required to complete option courses as well as the major(s) and minor(s). All BA degrees require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for the major(s), minor(s), or options.

The Anthropology Major is 42 to 60 non-duplicative anthropology credits with a minimum 36 credits at the senior-level. Students must complete a minimum of 24 ANTH credits at the 300- or 400-level and a minimum of six credits must be at the 400-level, not including ANTH 495Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Major Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts - Anthropology Major
Specific Major Requirements
ANTH 101Introduction to Anthropology3
ANTH 206Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 207Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 208Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology3
ANTH 209Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
ANTH 399Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology3
ANTH 394Ethnographic Research Methods 3
or ANTH 395 Archaeological Method Issues
ANTH 415Anthropological Theory 3
or ANTH 481 Archaeological Theory History
General Major Requirements
Choose 18 to 36 credits from junior- or senior-level ANTH, AEPS, or URBW with a minimum of 15 ANTH credits at the 300- or 400-level and a minimum of 3 ANTH credits at the 400-level. Students may complete a maximum of 6 credits of AEPS or URBW.18-36
Secondary Major or Minor(s)
Students have the option of completing a second Arts major, or one or two minors. Minor courses must be completed at the senior-level.18-60
Options
Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses.0-60
Total Credits120

Anthropology Honours 

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) Anthropology Honours degree program requires students to complete 120 credits of non-duplicative coursework. The Anthropology Honours program is comprised of 30 credits designated as Specific Honours Requirements (including 6-credits of thesis work), 33 credits designated as General Honours Requirements, and 57 credits of non-Anthropology Options. Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Honours Requirements.

For consideration of admittance/acceptance into Anthropology Honours, students must present the following:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 university-level credits applicable to the program of study, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher
  2. 24 of the 45 credits must have been completed in the last 12 months
  3. A minimum of six ANTH credits completed at the senior-level
  4. A minimum GPA of 3.3 across all senior-level ANTH courses

Students accepted and enrolled in the Anthropology Honours program must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. As well, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 across all senior-level ANTH courses for each 12 consecutive months following acceptance into the Honours program. Failure to do so will result in the student's program status reverting to a BA Anthropology Major.

Students have the option of completing a minor within the requirements of the Anthropology Honours program. Minors are comprised of 18 senior-level credits and can replace the Options credits. All BA degrees, including Honours, require Breadth Requirements. Courses can satisfy both the breadth requirements and requirements for Honours, Minor, or options.

Bachelor of Arts - Anthropology Honours
Specific Honours Requirements
ANTH 101Introduction to Anthropology3
ANTH 206Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 207Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH 208Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology3
ANTH 209Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
ANTH 394Ethnographic Research Methods 3
or ANTH 395 Archaeological Method Issues
ANTH 399Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology3
ANTH 415Anthropological Theory 3
or ANTH 481 Archaeological Theory History
ANTH 499AHonours Thesis I3
ANTH 499BHonours Thesis II3
General Honours Requirements
Choose 33 credits from junior- or senior-level ANTH, AEPS, or URBW with a minimum of 15 credits in ANTH at the 300- or 400-level and a minimum of 3 credits in ANTH at the 400-level. Students may complete a maximum of 6 credits of AEPS or URBW.33
Options
Students can complete up to 18 credits in out-of-faculty options, with no more than 3 credits in physical activity (PACT) courses.57
Total Credits120
 
 

Anthropology Minor

The Anthropology Minor requires 18 senior-level ANTH, AEPS, or URBW credits. A minimum of nine credits must be in ANTH at the 300- or 400-level, including ANTH 399. Junior-level ANTH 101 is required in addition to the 18 senior-level credits. Students may choose up to 3 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the Peoples requirement.

Specific Minor Requirements
ANTH 399Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology3
Choose 6 credits from the following:6
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Choose 3 credits from the following:3
Ethnography of Mediterranean Peoples
Circumpolar Peoples
Introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada
Peoples and Cultures of Mesoamerica
Peoples and Cultures of South America
Any URBW or AEPS course
General Minor Requirements
Choose 6 credits from 300- and 400- level ANTH6
Total Credits18

Degree Regulations

Students are strongly encouraged to seek advice from the academic advisors about academic planning for completing degree requirements at MacEwan University.

Academic Residency - Credit Requirements

In addition to the academic residency requirements of the University, upon admission to the Bachelor of Arts (BA), students also must complete at MacEwan University:

  • A minimum of 24 credits at the senior-level in the major discipline, with 12 of those senior credits completed at the 300- or 400-level. All 400-level requirements are to be completed at MacEwan University.
  • If applicable, a minimum of nine credits at the senior-level in a minor, with at least three of those credits at the 300- or 400- level.

Students with a previous MacEwan University credential are required to complete a minimum of 45 credits upon admission to the BA.

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from another post-secondary institution must complete a minimum of 60 additional MacEwan University credits applicable to the BA. Forty-five of these credits must be completed while the students is enrolled in the BA. This credit requirement applies to students who began their studies at MacEwan University and completed a credential at another institution.

Students who interrupt their program and who must apply for readmission to the program will be required to comply with any new regulations upon resumption of their studies.

Breadth Requirements

Courses taken to fulfil major, minor, or option requirements can also be used to satisfy breadth requirements.

Declaration of a Major and a Minor

Students are advised to declare a primary major and a minor, or a primary major and secondary major, or a primary major and two minors by the time they have completed 45 credits. Primary majors are selected from Arts disciplines and consist of 42 to 60 junior- and senior-level credits; secondary majors can be from an Arts or a Science discipline. Students cannot declare a multi-disciplinary science major (Mathematical or Physical Science majors). Except for those students in an Honours program, a maximum of 60 credits may be completed from any one discipline for credit towards the degree. A major and minor cannot be in the same discipline and students may not declare more than one out-of-faculty minor. Students can re-declare their major(s) and/or minor(s) if required.

For students completing multiple majors or minors, the Faculty cannot guarantee a schedule of classes that will permit the student to complete their degree in eight consecutive fall and winter semesters. Furthermore, depending on the configuration of the student's degree, meeting the requirements for the degree may require the completion of more than 120 credits for graduation. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Advising Office and a discipline advisor in their major and minor disciplines prior to declaration.

Restricted Enrolment Courses

The Faculty of Arts and Science strives to accommodate all students wishing to enrol in a given course when it is appropriate to their own program: however, classes in some courses must, for academic reasons, be restricted in size. If such a course is found to be oversubscribed, priority in registration will be given to those students whose programs may require it (e.g., majors, Honours, and/or minors) and then to other students as space permits.

Graduation Grade Point Average

As part of the Graduation Grade Point Average regulation above, Bachelor of Arts students must obtain an overall GGPA of 2.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the major(s) and a minimum GPA of 2.0 on all courses credited toward the minor(s).

Graduation Requirements

Graduation requirements are governed by the date on which students declare their major(s) and minor(s). Students who declare their major(s) and minor(s) on or before the published deadline are bound by the requirements of the current academic year. Those students who declare after the published deadline are bound by the programs of study and degree requirements of the upcoming academic year as published in the MacEwan University Academic Calendar.

Junior- and Senior-Level Courses

Courses numbered from 100 to 199 are considered junior-level and courses numbered from 200 to 499 are considered senior-level.

Major or Minor 300- and 400-Level Requirements

The 300- and 400-level requirements in the major or minor cannot consist solely of project, field placement, and/or individual study courses.

Maximum Independent Courses

The maximum number of credits for independent work (project, field placement, and/or individual study courses), excluding the Honours Thesis, is 15 credits. Specific disciplines may have further restrictions.

Maximum Junior-Level Courses

A maximum of 48 credits at the 100-level are permitted in completion of the BA degree. Additional courses at the 100-level will be declared extra to the 120 credits required to complete the BA degree and will not be counted toward fulfilment of graduation requirements.

Minimum Arts Courses

Students are required to complete successfully a minimum of 72 credits from Arts courses.

Minimum Passing Grade

A minimum grade of D or credit (CR) is required for all Arts degree courses unless otherwise noted next to the appropriate course in the program of study. 

Minimum Transfer Grade for Credit

A minimum grade of D is required on any transfer credit granted for the program. Unless otherwise stated, Arts and Science courses require a minimum grade of C- when the course is used as a prerequisite. Transfer credit decisions made by the university are final and cannot be appealed.

Out-of-Faculty Options Requirements

Students may take a maximum of 18 credits from courses offered by a MacEwan University Faculty or School other than Arts and Science. Students completing an out-of-Faculty minor or laddering students who have met the minor requirements with a MacEwan University diploma must complete their degree requirements from courses offered within the Faculty of Arts and Science or from the list of Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions in the Academic Calendar. Courses deemed as Cross-Faculty Course Recognitions are used to fulfill in-Faculty courses within the BA and do not count as out-of-Faculty options. Fine arts courses taken to fulfil breadth requirements count as in-Faculty credit.

Progression of Studies

Students are responsible for ensuring they meet the prerequisite and/or co-requisite requirements as noted on all courses that may fulfil Bachelor of Arts or Arts Honours program requirements.

Honours Regulations

Overall Requirements

The Honours program of study consists of 63 to 84 credits as determined by the discipline. Students in the Honours program may choose to complete a minor outside of the Honours discipline. Some disciplines may require a minor.

Acceptance to Honours

For consideration of admittance/acceptance into Honours, students must present a minimum of 45 university-level credits applicable to the program of study, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. They must complete 24 of the 45 credits in the last 12 months; however, exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor. Individual departments may have additional requirements noted in their program of study.

Course Load

Students accepted into an Honours program must complete 24-credits in each twelve consecutive months they are in the program. Exceptions to this rule may occur with the approval of the Honours discipline advisor.

Grade Point Average Requirement

Students accepted and enrolled in the Arts Honours program must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 across all courses in the degree. As well, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline for each twelve consecutive months following acceptance into the Honours program. Failure to do so will result in the student’s program status reverting to a BA with a major in the previous honours discipline.

Graduation Grade Point Average

In order to graduate, students must obtain an overall GGPA of 3.0 or higher, with a minimum GPA of 3.3 across a set of courses designated by each discipline.

Program Learning Outcomes

Faculty of Arts and Science Degree-Level Learning Outcomes

Thinking about knowledge is at the core of University education and learning within the Faculty of Arts and Science. Students develop capacities to “think-through” - to practice wonder, reflection, and engage in thoughtful inquiry and dialogue. Thinking-through involves questioning beyond the confines of one's immediate personal, social, and disciplinary surroundings. First, knowledge is acquired and understood. Learning moves beyond acquiring information and data to a formally disciplined manner of thinking about knowledge. Next, knowledge is interrogated by asking and answering questions, distinguishing between opinion and knowledge, and developing tools to assess reasons and evidence. Finally, knowledge is synthesized as students develop coherent arguments, and link ideas together beyond what is immediately apparent. Learning is a lifelong creative process of discovery and action that happens beyond the classroom and the degree. Our graduates interact with and contribute to their community by integrating and applying the research and communication skills and ways of knowing developed through their education. Learning outcomes capture the observable knowledge, skills, and abilities graduates acquire that are the foundation of learning.

Graduates will demonstrate their ability to “think-through” by:

  1. Analysing puzzles, problems, concepts, and theories.
  2. Conceptualizing questions based on disciplinary knowledge.
  3. Evaluating knowledge within and across disciplines in ways that acknowledge historical, cultural, and social contexts.

Graduates will demonstrate research and scholarship skills by:

  1. Applying appropriate research skills and ethical principles.
  2. Interpreting results appreciating the value and limits of conclusions.
  3. Recognizing how research involves an ongoing process of reflection, dialogue, and reassessment.

Graduates will demonstrate diverse skills for communication by:

  1. Conveying complex ideas coherently in a variety of formats.
  2. Appraising information in ways that consider context and audience.
  3. Interpreting the ideas and arguments of others in ways that reflect their knowledge, judgement, and comprehension.

Graduates will demonstrate durable skills necessary for learning beyond their degree by:

  1. Collaborating with diverse groups.
  2. Examining different perspectives and challenging biases and preconceptions.
  3. Exploring the continuous impact and limitations of disciplinary knowledge and expertise.

Anthropology Major Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Anthropology, you will be able to

‘Think anthropologically’ by:

  1. Describing how the holistic, comparative, multidisciplinary, and evolutionary approach of anthropology differs from other social sciences;
  2. Describing the importance of the concept of Culture for the field of anthropology, and by demonstrating how different definitions of Culture can be applied to address different questions;
  3. Explaining human biological, cultural, and linguistic diversity across time and space
  4. Appraising how the actions of individuals and local groups both shape and are shaped by larger sociocultural and ecological systems.

Demonstrate research and scholarship skills by:

  1. Employing methods that are both uniquely anthropological (e.g., ethnographic research, archaeological excavations) and borrowed from other disciplines (e.g., geology, biology, sociology, linguistics);
  2. Evaluating research using an anthropological lens;
  3. Selecting qualitative and quantitative methods that are appropriate for a topic of study;
  4. Conducting independent and collaborative research.

Effectively communicate anthropological knowledge by:

  1. Employing a variety of modes and media appropriate for different audiences.

Demonstrate ethical practice by:

  1. Acknowledging professional standards in the discipline and the responsibilities involved;
  2. Describing how anthropological research takes place in reciprocal and collaborative relationships with partners and communities.

Student Plan

  • The student plan provides a suggested course sequence with the minimum number of credits required for the major
  • The suggested course sequence depends on course availability, the student's schedule, and the student's choice of minor(s) or secondary major
  • It is highly recommended that students complete their Breadth Requirements by the end of year 2
  • Students can complete up to 6 credits of AEPS or URBW to fulfill the General Major Requirements
Year 1Credits
ANTH 1013
ENGL 1023
Breadth Requirements24
 30
Year 2Credits
ANTH 2063
ANTH 2073
ANTH 2083
ANTH 2093
Breadth, Option, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements18
 30
Year 3Credits
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from the following:3
ANTH 3993
Choose 9 credits (3 courses) from 300- or 400-level ANTH9
Option, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements15
 30
Year 4Credits
Choose 3 credits (1 course) from the following:3
Choose 3 credits (1 courses) from 400-level ANTH3
Choose 3 credits (1 courses) from 300- or 400-level ANTH3
Options, Minor(s), or Primary or Secondary Major Requirements21
 30
Total Credits 120
 

Expected Course Offerings

Following is a list of expected course offerings for fall 2024 and winter 2025. We will update the list with expected courses scheduled for fall 2025 and winter 2026 in February 2024. In addition to the specific courses listed below, Anthropology typically offers additional 300- and 400-level courses each year across a range of subfields. Specific topics will vary depending on instructor availability and current events (see the complete list of ANTH courses for examples of additional courses that may be offered), but students can be assured that required courses will be available annually. 

Fall 2024
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Gender, Age and Culture
World Prehistory
Ethnography of Mediterranean Peoples
Introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada
Race and Racism in The Modern World
Human Variation and Adaptation
Zooarchaeology
Archaeology of the Americas
Topics in Anthropology
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Health and Healing
Ethnographic Research Methods
Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology
Humans, Climate and Culture
Culture and Globalization
Topics in Anthropology
Winter 2025
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Gender, Age and Culture
World Prehistory
Circumpolar Peoples
Introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada
Race and Racism in The Modern World
Language, Gender, and Sexuality
Political Anthropology
Language Endangerment and Revitalization
Anthropology of Science
Canadian Indigenous Issues
Topics in Anthropology
Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology
Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Colonial Encounters
Archaeological Theory History
Topics in Anthropology
 

Admission Requirements

Applicants may be admitted to one of the following:

Regular Admission 

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must have a minimum overall average of 65 percent, with no course grade lower than 50 percent, in the following high school courses:

  1. ELA 30-1
  2. Four subjects from Group A, B, C, or D

Notes:

  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to present a broad range of subjects in order to benefit from the breadth of learning and to increase flexibility of future program and course choices.
  • A maximum of two Group B subjects may be presented; they must be from different disciplines.
  • A maximum of one Group D subject may be presented. Group D subjects used for admission must be 5-credit or any credit combination of at least 5 credits (e.g., two 3-credit subjects).
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Economics.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 31 is required for Economics Honours.
  • Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2 is required for a major in Psychology.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Mature Admission

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicants must be Canadian Applicants, 20 years of age or older, and have been out of full-time high school at least one year by the beginning of the intake term. Applicants must have the following:

  • ELA 30-1 with a minimum grade of 65 percent (or equivalent)

OR

  • Three credits of university-level English, including ENGL 111 from MacEwan University, with a minimum grade of C.

Applicants with nine to 23 university-level credits must also present a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Applicants with 24 or more university-level credits will be considered under Previous Post-Secondary Work.

Previous Post-Secondary Work

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Admission in this category does not imply or guarantee the transfer of any coursework and/or credential unless a block transfer agreement (internal or external) is in effect and published in the calendar by the Office of the University Registrar. In addition, transfer of coursework does not imply or guarantee that an applicant will be admitted.

Applicants must have successfully completed the following from a recognized institution:

  • A minimum of 24 university-level credits with a minimum Admission Grade Point Average (AGPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Additional Admission Criteria

All applicants must meet the following:

1. English Language Proficiency

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

All applicants must meet an acceptable level of English language proficiency. We will require official documents such as high school or post-secondary transcripts or proof of successful completion of standardized language evaluation. Full details are available in MacEwan University’s academic calendar or online at MacEwan.ca/ELP.

2. Other Admission Criteria

To be evaluated through the Office of the University Registrar

Applicable to all admission categories

Applicants who have been assigned two unsatisfactory academic records within the past five years will not be considered for admission or re-admission to the program until a minimum three years from the date of the assignment of the last unsatisfactory academic record. For the purpose of admission or re-admission, an unsatisfactory record is defined as a transcript with the notation ‘required to withdraw’ or equivalent.

 

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 101
Introduction to Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is a general introduction to anthropology through the study of central concepts and key issues. Topics include human evolution, the appearance of culture, social organization, cultural theory, symbolic systems, and culture change.

ANTH 108
Elements of Human Linguistics
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to the principle ideas about language and communication, including laboratory exercises. Course content includes the evolution of language, anatomy of language, principles and main categories of linguistic analysis (phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics), linguistic diversity, and cross-linguistic variation.

ANTH 206
Introduction to Archaeology
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course provides a general introduction to the methods, practice and theory of prehistoric archaeology. Topics include the goals and objectives of the discipline, data collection and analysis as well as methods of interpretation. Emphasis is on methods used to reconstruct prehistoric life-ways and explain cultural development rather than a general survey of prehistory. Note:This course can be used to fulfil the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in a 100-level course in ANTH or EASC 101.

ANTH 207
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an overview of socio-cultural anthropology, which introduces the students to the diversity of human cultures and the concepts and theoretical orientation of the cultural anthropologist. Unity and diversity in human social life are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in a 100-level ANTH course.

ANTH 208
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the anthropological study of language and communication. It examines the analytical methods and theory used in linguistic anthropology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in a 100-level course in ANTH.

ANTH 209
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course introduces students to the sub-discipline of biological anthropology. Students examine the emergence of the human species and the theoretical and methodological frameworks used to understand present-day human biological variation. Topics include basic principles of evolutionary theory, human skeletal biology, comparative primate anatomy and behaviour, and hominid evolution. Note: This course can be used to fulfill the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in a 100-level course in ANTH.

ANTH 210
Gender, Age and Culture
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines sex, gender, and age from an anthropological perspective. It examines how societies construct sex and gender and what it means to be an engendered person cross-culturally. The course considers the impact of sex, gender, and age differences as crucial aspects of social organization and structure, as well as how they relate to broader economic and political processes, such as colonialism and globalization, that shape the daily lives of humans.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ANTH 101, or second-year standing.

ANTH 219
World Prehistory
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course surveys the development of societies around the world over the last 3 million years. It begins by introducing the discipline of archaeology and the methods and techniques used to learn about the human past. Cultural sequences from various regions of the Old and New World (eg. Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, Europe, Mesoamerica, and the Andes) are examined. Finally, comparisons are made between these cultural sequences to explore such topics as the origins of agriculture, the development of complex societies, human dispersals and colonization, and the long-term effects of climate change and demographic growth.

ANTH 245
Ethnography of Mediterranean Peoples
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course investigates anthropologists' contributions to understanding Mediterranean societies and cultures. The concept of a "Mediterranean culture" is critiqued. Through cross-cultural comparison, students investigate the diversity occurring in "Mediterranean" cultures, but also shared and parallel institutions and practices. Relevant historical, geographic, and environmental factors are explored and considered in light of anthropological explanation of circum-Mediterranean cultural institutions, social organization and practices.

ANTH 246
Circumpolar Peoples
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the Inuit culture of Canada and other cultures of the circumpolar region. The course includes an introduction to anthropological perspectives, research methods and cross cultural analyses as well as to the geographical and cultural boundaries that exist in the north. Various topics are covered including the impacts of climate change, re-settlement, economic growth, and health issues.

ANTH 250
Introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada from an anthropological perspective. Topics covered may include oral traditions, culture areas, politics, economics, family, kinship, religion, and conflict between cultural groups.

ANTH 251
Race and Racism in The Modern World
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course offers an anthropological perspective on how the concept of race has been used to examine biological and cultural variation among humans. Issues and topics may include theoretical and methodological perspectives of race and racism, multiculturalism and interculturalism, migration, ethnic identity, prejudice and ethnocentrism, racism, caste system, eugenics, and the persistence of ethnic identity in the face of globalization. Case studies dealing with race issues in Canada and other countries are used to illustrate these concepts.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ANTH 101, or second-year standing.

ANTH 261
Peoples and Cultures of Mesoamerica
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the culture area of Mesoamerica. It examines the cultural history of the native peoples of Mesoamerica from the pre-Columbian past to the present and includes studies of contemporary native communities.

ANTH 262
Peoples and Cultures of South America
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the cultural history of the native peoples of South America. It examines the social and culture history of indigenous peoples, surveying local and regional cultural variations.

ANTH 305
Human Variation and Adaptation
3 Credits          Weekly (2-1-0)

This course examines, from a biocultural perspective, the extraordinary range of human biological variation and explores the evolutionary, adaptive, behavioural, cultural and environmental influences that produce this diversity. The first half of the course examines historical perspectives on human differences and outlines our current understanding of the basic principles of evolutionary biology.  The second half of the course examines how these principles have been used to explain such aspects of human variation as body size and shape, skin colour, blood chemistry, and disease. Throughout the course, the interaction of biology and culture are discussed, as well as the veracity of such contentious topics as 'race', intelligence, sex differences and genetic disorders. Note: This course can be used to fulfill the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 209.

ANTH 308
Language, Gender, and Sexuality
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course addresses major themes and approaches to the study of language and gender and of language and sexuality. Students engage in critical examination of how cultural paradigms of gender and sexuality are constructed, expressed, challenged, and transformed through linguistic practice and performance, as well as how language is involved in the construction of social identities and communities. This course considers gender and sexuality in a cross-linguistic and cross-cultural perspective. Students learn to apply sociolinguistic and linguistic anthropological theories to the study of gender, sexuality, and social power.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ANTH 208.

ANTH 318
Political Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

The course examines some of the major theoretical approaches to politics and power which have emerged within Anthropology, or which have influenced anthropological writings. Employing a cross-cultural, comparative perspective, this course shows that, in western society, 'politics' describes activities and institutions focused around political parties, government, and the state; within anthropology, however, the term 'politics' is linked to the idea of 'power', where power is an aspect of a broad range of relationships from the most local to the global. The course addresses issues as diverse as uncentralized politics, state formation, and the impact of global power relations on the micro-level of everyday interaction.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 320
Archaeology of Gender
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines approaches to gender in archaeological research from methodological, theoretical, and historical perspectives. The course focuses on the impact of a ‘gendered’ archaeology against a backdrop of a more general examination of anthropological theories, gender roles, gender ideology and gender politics.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206.

ANTH 321
Language Endangerment and Revitalization
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course focuses on the social, political, and economic causes and impacts of language loss from a global perspective. Emphasis is placed on Indigenous languages, but minority languages of Europe and Asia are also discussed. Practical strategies for sustaining and revitalizing Indigenous languages are analyzed. Students take an anthropological perspective on the challenges facing endangered language communities and the global and local meanings of linguistic diversity.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 208.

ANTH 322
Plagues, Pandemics, and People
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course uses a biocultural approach to examine the evolutionary, ecological and epidemiological context of selected historic and emerging infectious disease epidemics and pandemics. Complex biological, social and economic repercussions for human populations are considered.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or ANTH 209.

ANTH 324
Economic Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the key theoretical approaches and research in economic anthropology. Employing a cross-cultural, comparative perspective, this course investigates anthropologists' studies of exchange behaviour as social, political and economic phenomena. The course is designed not only to broaden understanding of exchange in other societies, but to provide the comparative data necessary to evaluate our own forms of exchange and measures of economic well-being. Particular emphasis is placed upon a critical examination of the typologies created and employed by economic anthropologists.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207.

ANTH 332
Anthropology of Science
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course investigates science as a cultural and historical product. Employing the anthropological perspective across the four sub-fields, this course investigates anthropologists' studies of science and seeks to understand how science is created within ideological, social, economic, and political environments. The course is designed not only to broaden understanding of science in other societies, but also to provide the comparative data necessary to evaluate western understanding.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or ANTH 209.

ANTH 340
Canadian Indigenous Issues
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course employs an anthropological approach to analyze issues facing Canadian Indigenous Peoples today. Cultural theories for the analysis of patterns, processes and trends are examined. Specific topics include Indigenous Peoples and Canadian politics, economics, education, religion, health, law and the arts.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207 or ANTH 250.

ANTH 370
The Anthropology of Space and Place
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

Much of anthropological data is based on notions of space and place. Archaeologists invest much of their time in detailing location and arrangement of built form and material culture. This course examines the theoretical and methodological approaches to landscape, space, and place in anthropology and archaeology. Topics may include the conceptualization of space, place, and landscape in anthropological and archaeological research and writing, the changing nature of concepts of landscape, and space and place as analytical frameworks for understanding past, present, and future societies and cultures. We consider three related dimensions of human spatial practice over time and space/place: experience, perception, and imagination.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206 or ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 375
Zooarchaeology
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

This course is an introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological contexts. Topics discussed include the reconstruction of environment and season of site occupation, the economic uses of animals and evidence of animal domestication, and the procedures for analyzing faunal remains and challenges in their interpretation. Note: This course can be used to fulfill the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206 and ANTH 209.

ANTH 385
Archaeology of the Americas
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides a survey of select prehistoric cultures of North, Central and South America. Topics to be discussed include the peopling of the Americas, rise of pre-Columbian civilizations and the variety of cultural adaptations in the Americas.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206.

ANTH 388
Artifact Analysis
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

This course covers a variety of methods for analysing and interpreting items of material culture commonly recovered from archaeological contexts.  Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding the technologies used to manufacture prehistoric and historic artifacts and the methods used to analyse their functions and stylistic attributes.  Lab work includes exercises in qualitative and quantitative description and classification, and experiments in tool use and manufacture. Note: This course can be used to fulfill the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206.

ANTH 389
Topics in Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course examines a substantive topic or topics of relevance to Anthropology. The topic for the course varies and is announced prior to registration. This course may be taken up to two times provided the course topic is different.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or ANTH 209; depending on the topic, instructors may specify one of ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or ANTH 209 as recommended background.

ANTH 390
Human Osteology
3 Credits          Weekly (1-2-0)

A hands-on laboratory course that offers a comprehensive study of the human skeleton, both as a dynamic, living system and as a source of information for reconstructing past human lives. During the first part of the course we cover basic skeletal biology and students learn to identify and side every human bone, a large number of fragmentary bones, and all of the major morphological features on each bone. During the second part of the course, we explore the methods used to recover human skeletal remains from archaeological and forensic contexts, and students learn to apply techniques for reconstructing past lives from skeletal remains including health and disease, biological relatedness, physical activity patterns, and estimates of age, sex and stature. Throughout the course we discuss the ethics of dealing with human remains. Note:This course can be used to fulfill the arts credit requirements of the Bachelor of Arts and the science credit requirement of the Bachelor of Science.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 209.

ANTH 393
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Health and Healing
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction to the sub-field of Medical Anthropology. Beginning with an overview of central concepts and theoretical perspectives of medical anthropology, this course addresses the different ways in which health and illness are constructed cross-culturally, the roles of healers in different societies, and the political economy and social determinants of health and illness.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in a 100-level ANTH course.

ANTH 394
Ethnographic Research Methods
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course concentrates on the perspectives, qualitative methods, and research strategies employed by ethnographers. Special emphasis is placed on techniques of major ethnographic research traditions, methods of data collection, analysis of narrative or textual data, ethical issues in research and presentation of research results. Grant writing and the use of such tools as computer software, film and other recording devices in ethnographic research are also explored. Note: The consent of the Department is required for Non-Anthropology majors.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of the following: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 395
Archaeological Method Issues
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

As a survey of theory and practices currently used in archaeology, students study the concepts and models used for interpreting archaeological data as well as the evaluation of ethical issues regarding archaeological investigations and remains.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206.

ANTH 396
Archaeological Field Training
6 Credits          Total (0-0-90)

This course provides students with an introduction to archaeological field work. Students experience all practical archaeological field techniques, including survey, excavation, laboratory analysis, cataloguing artifacts and conservation.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206 and consent of the department.

ANTH 397
Ethnographic Field School
6 Credits          Total (0-0-90)

Anthropology is a broadly-based approach to understanding the human experience. Ethnographic methods approach this experience primarily, but not exclusively, through observation and participation in daily activities of communities. This course combines seminars with ethnographic research. Over the course of the field school, students learn the steps involved in designing and executing an ethnographic research project. They are trained in the central methods of ethnographic research and analysis. Where appropriate, allied field methods may be introduced. Note: ANTH 394 is recommended. Please note that acceptance into the field school is competitive and subject to an application process which includes a panel interview. Upon preliminary selection, all students have to attend a mandatory 15-hour pre-departure seminar and write a report. The seminar is graded as a component of the final grade.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207 or ANTH 208 and consent of the department.

ANTH 398
Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits an intermediate-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrolment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the student’s project.

ANTH 399
Ecological Perspectives in Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (3-0-0)

This course considers the question of human relationships to the environment as mediated through culture. To what extent and in what ways can we consider "nature" or "the environment" as sociocultural constructions? Alternatively, to what extent and in what ways are cultures shaped by natural environments? Interdisciplinary in nature, this course brings together concerns about the production and use of knowledge regarding human social and cultural behavior in specific environmental contexts.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of the following: ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208 or ANTH 209.

ANTH 410
Humans, Climate and Culture
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course examines the role of climate in our species' evolutionary history and conversely, human influence upon climate. Theories about the role of climate in shaping social organization and social "complexity" are addressed in light of evidence from the prehistoric record. The prehistoric and historic record of human responses to and influences upon climate will further be examined through regional and local case studies. The course concludes with a review of sociocultural institutions and practices as they relate to climate; cultural perceptions of weather and climate; cultural responses to climate change; and finally, the consequences to cultures of climate change.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of the following: ANTH 206 or ANTH 207, or ANTH 209 or EASC 208.

ANTH 411
Environmental Archaeology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course provides an overview of the techniques used in the analysis of past environments and the human interactions in these environments. Theories and methods are presented for reconstructing ancient ecosystems and assessing human transformation of these ecosystems. Case studies are used as examples.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206.

ANTH 415
Anthropological Theory
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course is an overview of key trends and paradigms in anthropological theory, from classical to contemporary approaches. Using a topical or thematic approach we consider the contributions of a number of anthropological theorists. Through the application of theoretical perspectives to case studies and ethnographies, the distinctive and mutual relationship between theory, method, and ethnographic data in anthropology is emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207 or ANTH 208 and any 300-level ANTH course.

ANTH 420
Culture and Globalization
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

Transnational movement of money, media images, information, and people have spawned intense debates about the global impact of commodities, ideas, and capital on cultural and biological diversity. This course provides an anthropological consideration of globalization and its relationship to culture, modernity, tradition, diaspora, nationalism, race, class, and gender. In particular, we track the movements and reconfigurations of capital(ism), commodities, communication, and people by focusing on ethnographic analyses of such circuits.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 207 or ANTH 208 and a 300-level ANTH course.

ANTH 421
Language and Power
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

While language indexes the power relationships within a society and naturalizes them, it is also critical in the formation of social groups and struggle for power and prestige. In analyzing uses of language in a wide range of social and political contexts, the course addresses issues which include the ways language, power, hegemony and political struggle are related; the effects of nationalism on language; the role of language as a means of creating social organization and hierarchy; the relationship between minority and majority languages and cultures; and the role of the media, popular culture and literacy in contemporary linguistic and social relations.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 208 and in one 300-level ANTH course.

ANTH 440
The Anthropology of Colonial Encounters
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course examines the process of European colonization and expansion in the Americas and its long-term consequences from an anthropological perspective. Topics considered include the complex historical motives of peoples entangled in colonial relations, the political and ecological effects upon cultures, and the role of colonialism in shaping the discipline of anthropology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 206 or ANTH 207 and one of ANTH 246, ANTH 250, ANTH 261 or ANTH 262.

ANTH 444
Applied Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This seminar course explores applied anthropology as a fifth sub-field of anthropology and as a practice that is both an aspiration and a vocation for many contemporary anthropologists. Students in this class will explore and apply methods used by contemporary anthropologists to unpack and find solutions to current social problems. The course investigates the relevance of anthropology to practical concerns such as cultural heritage, development work, sustainability, and immigration. Students will also learn about anthropology's versatility and its application in numerous related fields like policy, business, and law. This course will pay particular attention to ethical dilemmas in applied fieldwork and the relationship between anthropology and advocacy.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 394 or ANTH 395.

ANTH 481
Archaeological Theory History
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course provides in-depth analysis of the evolution of archaeological theory from early antiquarianism to current ideas and practices.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in either ANTH 206 or ANTH 209 and a 300 level ANTH course.

ANTH 486
Archaeology of Death
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This course considers the role of mortuary evidence in facilitating understanding of past cultures. By examining numerous case studies, the course draws on a variety of anthropological and archaeological frameworks to explore how people treat their dead and what this can tell us about both the dead and the living.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in ANTH 206 or ANTH 209 and a 300-level ANTH course.

ANTH 495
Anthropology Field Placement
3 Credits          Total (0-0-100)

In this course, the students are assigned to a public, private, or non-profit organization where they apply their knowledge and skills in research or other practical aspects of a project. Note: This course does not fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major and minor. Acceptance into the field placement is competitive and subject to an application process which includes an interview.

Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C- in 6 credits of 300-level ANTH and consent of the department.

ANTH 497
Topics in Anthropology
3 Credits          Weekly (0-0-3)

This is a seminar course for students interested in advanced study of specialized areas of anthropology. This course is devoted to the detailed study of a single theme - particularly themes of contemporary relevance or debate - and it rotates among the subfields in Anthropology.

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in one of ANTH 206, ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or ANTH 209 and a minimum grade of C- in any 300-level ANTH course.

ANTH 498
Advanced Independent Study
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

This course permits a senior-level student to work with an instructor to explore a specific topic in depth through research or directed reading in primary and secondary sources. The student plans, executes and reports the results of their independent research or study project under the direction of a faculty supervisor. To be granted enrolment in the course, the student must have made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the student’s project.

ANTH 499A
Honours Thesis I
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty member, students conduct an research project culminating in the Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings. Note: This course is restricted to and required of students in the Honours Anthropology program. Students complete both ANTH 499A and 499B in consecutive terms to attain credit for this course.

Prerequisites: Registration in the Honours Program and consent of the department.

ANTH 499B
Honours Thesis II
3 Credits          Total (0-0-45)

Under the direction of a faculty member, students conduct a research project culminating in the Honours Thesis and formal presentation of research findings. Note: This course is restricted to and required of students in the Honours Anthropology program. Students complete both ANTH 499A and 499B in consecutive terms to attain credit for this course.

Prerequisites: Registration in the Honours Program and consent of the department.