Academic Calendar

Department of Humanities

Chair

Edvard Lorkovic, PhD (Alberta)
Philosophy

Classics

Classics is the study of ancient Greek and Latin art, culture, history, literature and religion and their effects on subsequent and contemporary civilizations. The study of Classics helps provide a solid background and better understanding of many of the disciplines in the Arts and Social Sciences. It is a particularly valuable component of a liberal education. Training in Classics helps students develop skills in oral and written expression; it gives students a greater understanding of western artistic, literary and philosophical traditions. Classics develops well-rounded students capable of critical thought, articulate argumentation and considered reasoning.

Faculty

Colin Bailey, PhD (British Columbia)
Classics

Benjamin Garstad, PhD (St. Andrews)
Classics

Maria Kozakiewicz, PhD (Alberta)
Classics

History

Historians craft history, make history, do history, and record history. It deals with anything and everything; from the daily life of a peasant to the history of ideas to diplomacy and conflict, from the ancient Aztecs to conflict in Afghanistan. History has few thematic borders and is eclectic in its choice of research methods. Specialized history courses cover such diverse topics as crime in early modern Europe, diplomacy and conflict in the modern world, policy related to Aboriginal people in Canada and many others.

Faculty

Michael Carroll, PhD (Toronto)
History

Robert Falconer, PhD (Guelph)
History

Sean Hannan, PhD (Chicago)
Social Science

Robert Irwin, PhD (Alberta)
History

Carolee Pollock. PhD (Alberta)
History

Kelly Summers, PhD (Stanford)
History

Languages

Studying languages at MacEwan University will enhance all aspects of a student’s educational experience. As our world continues to become culturally and economically more interconnected, being able to communicate in another world language is becoming increasingly necessary and important. Studying a language includes the study of a distinctive philosophical, literary, and artistic tradition. As students develop their language skills, they will foster improved critical thinking and problem solving skills and you will broaden your appreciation of the world and its people.

Faculty

Erin Cowling, PhD (Johns Hopkins)
Spanish

Marla Epp, MA (Pennsylvania)
French Literature

Suzanne Hayman, PhD (Dalhousie)
French

Kyeongmi Kim-Bernard, PhD (Paris-Sorbonne)
French

Maritza Mark, MA (Calgary)
Spanish

Cristina Ruiz Serrano, PhD (Alberta)
Spanish

Philosophy

Philosophy is one of the most abstract and yet practical and concrete disciplines of the Arts. It teaches analytical thinking, logical presentation, and competence with abstract concepts. More importantly, philosophy encourages students to consider more deeply and critically their own world-views and belief systems. It provides the opportunity to reflect, in a systematic and organized fashion, on basic issues that bear on our individual lives. The study of philosophy, especially ethics, can relate directly to business, medicine, public policy, education and law. Similarly, theoretical philosophy can complement and elaborate on concepts dealt with in psychology, sociology, religious studies and political science.

Faculty

Alain Beauclair, PhD (Oregon)
Philosophy

Celia Byrne, MA (Toronto)
Philosophy

Susan Mills, PhD (Pennsylvania)
Philosophy

Cyrus Panjvani, PhD (St. Andrews)
Philosophy

Randy Wojtowicz, PhD (UC San Diego)
Philosophy